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Massive Movement: Waste Segregation to be launched in 4,000 Cities in India: PM Narendra Modi

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New Delhi, May 28, 2017: Harping on the importance of waste management, Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Sunday announced launch a “massive movement” for waste collection across 4,000 cities of the country from June 5.

“We must not treat garbage as waste, it is wealth, a resource. Once we start looking it as wealth, we will come up with new means of waste management,” Modi said in his monthly radio address ‘Mann Ki Baat’.

“On June 5, on the occasion of World Environment Day, the government, in association with the state governments, will launch a massive movement of waste collection in 4,000 cities across the country.”

He said under the movement, separate dustbins — green for liquid waste and blue for dry waste — will be installed in these cities to develop a culture of segregating the two types of wastes.

“In the green basket put liquid waste like kitchen waste, things which decompose, and in the blue bin put waste like metals, broken boxes, plastic etc. The liquid waste can be used as manure for agricultural waste while the dry waste will be recycled.”

“I am confident that we can develop a culture of segregating waste and contributing towards waste effective waste managements,” the Prime Minister added. (IANS)

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Testosterone Level Determined by Environment During Childhood, Says Study

Bangladeshis in Britain also reached puberty at a younger age and were taller than men who lived in Bangladesh throughout their childhood

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Testosterone Level Determined by Environment During Childhood, Says Study
Testosterone Level Determined by Environment During Childhood, Says Study. (IANS)

Men who grew up in challenging conditions like prevalence of infectious diseases or poor nutrition may have lower levels of testosterone — male sex hormone — in later life, says a study.

The findings suggest that the differences may be linked to energy investment. For instance, in environments where people are more exposed to disease or poor nutrition, developing males direct their energy towards survival at the cost of testosterone.

While high testosterone levels may up the risk of ageing, muscle mass, prostate enlargement and cancer, lower levels may cause lack of energy, erectile dysfunction etc. Thus, the researchers suggest that any screening for risk profiles may need to take a man’s childhood environment into account.

“Very high and very low testosterone levels can have implications for men’s health and it could be important to know more about men’s childhood circumstances to build a fuller picture of their risk factors for certain conditions or diseases,” said Gillian Bentley from Britain’s Durham University.

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Representational image.

For the study, published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, the team collected data from 359 men born and still resident in Bangladesh; Bangladeshi men who moved to London as children; Bangladeshi men who moved to London as adults; second-generation, Britain born men whose parents were Bangladeshi migrants; and Britain born ethnic Europeans.

The results showed that Bangladeshi men who grew up and lived as adults in Britain had significantly higher levels of testosterone compared to relatively well-off men who grew up and lived in Bangladesh as adults.

Also Read: Attractiveness in Males is Not Associated With Female’s Hormone Levels, says Study

Bangladeshis in Britain also reached puberty at a younger age and were taller than men who lived in Bangladesh throughout their childhood.

Further, it was also found that the aspects of male reproductive function remain changeable up to the age of 19 and are more flexible in early rather than late childhood, but no longer heavily influenced by their surroundings. (IANS)

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