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McAfee Official Says, India Needs A More Secured Cybersecurity Ecosystem

India now has the National Cyber Coordination Centre

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Microsoft Cybersecurity
Cybersecurity, Pixabay

Although India has become more active when it comes to cybersecurity, the country needs to put all the pieces together to protect businesses via a foolproof ecosystem, a top executive from cybersecurity firm McAfee has stressed.

“India is interacting a lot with neighbours, coordinating with them via strategic MoUs on cybersecurity but there are few things that need to be patched to be able to respond faster and better to cyber attacks,” Ian Yip, Chief Technology Officer, Asia Pacific at McAfee, told IANS.

In a recent report released by the Australian Security Policy Institute, India ranked 10th on cyber security globally.

“The 10th rank globally is not that bad and there is room for improvement. India is in a good place to make those improvements by collaborating with all the stakeholders including cyber security firms,” Yip added.

India now has the National Cyber Coordination Centre, apart from a general computer emergency response team (CERT) and a separate CERT to protect the Banking, Financial services and Insurance (BFSI) sector.

According to Yip, there is now a full-fledged secondary market with cybercrime-as-a-service, helping cybercriminals leverage capabilities from fellow attackers and use advanced malware techniques to target enterprises.

Logo of McAfee
Logo of McAfee, flickr

“Cyber attackers have the capability to use some of the more advanced techniques. There is a secondary market with cybercrime-as-a-service, where they can leverage the capability of other criminals into the attack mechanisms,” Yip noted.

Apart from rising ransomware attacks, cryptojacking is now a big threat to companies.

Cryptocurrency mining is rising, said the executive, owing to the increase in the cryptocurrency value.

“Cryptojacking is more harmful for businesses and individuals than ransomware because it increases the cost of ransom,” Yip added.

The fourth quarter of 2017 saw a spike in the Bitcoin value, driving cybercriminals to focus on cryptocurrency hijacking through a variety of methods and was defined by rapid cybercriminal adoption of newer tools and schemes, a new McAfee report said recently.

According to Yip, the next big wave of innovation in cybersecurity solution is Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) solutions.

Cyber security
Cyber security, Pixabay

Also read: Google won’t develop deadly AI weapons but help military

“There is urgent need to automate, orchestrate and integrate as much of security infrastructure as possible amid skill shortage. Cyber attackers are now also trying to leverage the potential of New-Age technologies,” he noted. (IANS)

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Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

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Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

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Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

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Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

Also Read: Beware! Sipping Hot Tea Raises Risk of Esophageal Cancer

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)