Friday April 19, 2019

Media Multitasking Can Be Associated With Risk of Obesity

The team measured proactive behaviours of compulsive or inappropriate phone use (like feeling the urge to check phone for messages, while talking to someone) as well as passive behaviours like media-related distractions that interfere with your work.

0
//
The participants underwent an fMRI scan during which researchers measured brain activity, while people were shown a series of appetising but fattening foods' images. Pixabay

Do you keep switching between digital devices like smartphone, tablet and PC? Beware. A study has linked media multitasking to obesity.

The study showed that mindless switching between digital devices could be associated with increased susceptibility to food temptations and lack of self-control, which may cause weight gain.

“Increased exposure to phones, tablets and other portable devices has been one of the most significant changes to our environments in the past few decades, and this occurred during a period in which obesity rates also climbed in many places,” said lead author Richard Lopez, postdoctoral candidate from Rice University in the US.

food
When media multitaskers saw pictures of food, the part of the brain dealing with food temptation became more active, said researchers. Pixabay

The research, published in the journal Brain Imaging and Behaviour, included 132 participants aged 18-23 years.

The team measured proactive behaviours of compulsive or inappropriate phone use (like feeling the urge to check phone for messages, while talking to someone) as well as passive behaviours like media-related distractions that interfere with your work.

The findings showed those with higher scores were associated with higher body mass index (BMI) and greater body fat percentage.

social media
The study showed that mindless switching between digital devices could be associated with increased susceptibility to food temptations and lack of self-control, which may cause weight gain. Pixabay

The participants underwent an fMRI scan during which researchers measured brain activity, while people were shown a series of appetising but fattening foods’ images.

Also Read: Congress To Come Up With “National Clean Air Programme” To Combat The Menace of Air Pollution in India

When media multitaskers saw pictures of food, the part of the brain dealing with food temptation became more active, said researchers.

Lopez said it was important to establish such links given the rising obesity and prevalence of multimedia use. (IANS)

 

Next Story

 Study Claims, Men With A Diet Rich in Meat At Greater Risk of Death

The findings highlight the need to investigate the health effects of protein intake, especially in people who have a pre-existing chronic medical condition. 

0
food
"These findings should not be generalised to older people who are at a greater risk of malnutrition and whose intake of protein often remains below the recommended amount," said Heli Virtanen, a postdoctoral candidate from the University of Eastern Finland. Pixabay

Men with a diet rich in animal protein and meat such as sausages and cold cuts could be at a greater risk of death, finds a study.

The study found men who favoured animal protein over plant-based protein in their diet had a 23 per cent greater risk of death than men whose diet was more balanced in terms of their sources of protein.

diabetes
The findings highlight the need to investigate the health effects of protein intake, especially in people who have a pre-existing chronic medical condition. Pixabay

In addition, a high overall intake of dietary protein was associated with a greater risk of death in men who had been diagnosed with Type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease or cancer.

However, a similar association was not found in men without these diseases, said the study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

beef
The study found men who favoured animal protein over plant-based protein in their diet had a 23 per cent greater risk of death than men whose diet was more balanced in terms of their sources of protein. Pixabay

“These findings should not be generalised to older people who are at a greater risk of malnutrition and whose intake of protein often remains below the recommended amount,” said Heli Virtanen, a postdoctoral candidate from the University of Eastern Finland.

Also Read: Chinese Video Sharing App TikTok Continues Its Dramatic Rise in India

The findings highlight the need to investigate the health effects of protein intake, especially in people who have a pre-existing chronic medical condition.

For the study, the researchers included approximately 2,600 Finnish men aged between 42 and 60. (IANS)