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Meet 4 startups from India at Start-Up Chile

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Malavika Velayanikal

Start-Up Chile has gained a reputation over the years as one of the go-to accelerators in the world.

In the current 15th batch of startups in the state-backed Chilean accelerator program, India is the only Asian country represented.

The startups involved get visas and equity-free financing to relocate to Santiago for a minimum period of six months, which is the duration of the program. This year, the startups graduating in August will also be eligible to apply for a new follow-on fund called Start-Up Chile Scale if they choose to register the business in Chile.

startup-chile-country-wise-startups

Source: Start-Up Chile.

Now, let’s take a look at the startups from India which are discovering new vistas in the Chilean ecosystem. Education, health, and office productivity are their domains.

CareBuddy

carebuddy

Delhi-based CareBuddy helps people to manage their family’s healthcare – from doctor appointments, lab reports, and medicine delivery to keeping records and providing support.

The three co-founders – Ishan Jha, Ajay Pal Singh, and Kamal Aggarwal – began with the idea of providing an elderly care service for the Indian diaspora when they noticed several of their friends in the US struggling to cope with the care of their parents back home in India. CareBuddy is now an app that acts as a personal digital assistant for a variety of healthcare needs.

Rightaway

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Photo credit: Glassdoor.

Rightaway aims to provide a better alternative to Slack for businesses. Most collaboration apps are built as silos for teams within an organization. Rightaway recognizes businesses require such tools to work with customers, partners, and others outside the organization as well.

Founder Rishikesh Gorantala was a consulting manager for Deloitte in San Francisco, which gave him the opportunity to work with organizations across the US, Europe, and India. Rightaway is currently recruiting developers for its center in Bangalore.

Rymm Education

teacher student

Photo credit: Ilmicrofono Oggiono.

Rymm is a tool for teachers, students, and parents to collaborate in real time. Its premise is that the teacher-parent link needs to become far more dynamic than the traditional methods of report cards and PTA meetings. It’s currently working with over 40 schools in India.

Like many other Indian startups, Rymm is headquartered in Singapore, where it was incubated at JFDI Asia. Rymm founders Shaik Naushad and Charan Ikkurthi are entrepreneurs from Hyderabad.

MindHour

mindhour

MindHour is a bootstrapped startup from Kolkata in the east, which is beginning to make a mark on India’s startup scene. It uses a gamified approach to make the study of math and science more engaging for students aged 10 to 15. The site has a modest annual charge of US$45 (after a two-day free trial) to “make your school curriculum exciting.” It also has a three-month exam prep module.

It uses freelancers from Indian Institute Of Technology (IIT) campuses to create the learning content.

Two couples are the four founders. One of them, Varun Choudhary, an IIT Roorkee alumnus, is attending the accelerator program in Chile.

This article was first published at techniasia.com

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India Needs to Improve its Educational Outcomes to Catch up with China

To catch up with China, India needs to lay emphasis on improving its educational outcomes

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The Article 30 of the Constitution gives religious and linguistic minorities “the right to establish and administer educational institutions of their choice.”
India needs to improve its educational outcomes to catch up with China. Pixabay

By Amit Kapoor

Both China and India started building their national education systems under comparable conditions in the late 1940s. Different policies and historical circumstances have, however, led them to different educational outcomes, with China outperforming India not just in terms of its percentage of literate population and enrollment rates at all levels of education, but also in terms of number of world-class institutions in higher education, and greater research output.

The roots of China’s successful education system date back to the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), which unintentionally expanded access to the primary education through democratising the schooling system, which was previously elitist in character, thus addressing the problem of mass illiteracy.

In contrast, India continued to focus on its higher education system since independence and only realised the importance of basic education in 1986, keeping it behind China and many other countries in Asia in educational development. In terms of enrollment, China reached a 100 percent gross enrollment rate (GER) in its primary education in 1985, whereas, India attained that level only in 2000.

In terms of secondary school enrollment, India and China both started at the similar rates in 1985, with about 40 percent of their population enrolled in secondary schools. However, due to a wider base of primary school students, the rate of increase in China has been much faster than in India, with 99 percent secondary enrollment rate in China and 79 percent in India in 2017.

India is closing in on the Chinese rate in terms of access to education, but on the literacy level front, there is a huge gap in the percentage of literate populations in the two countries. In the age group of 15-24 years, India scores 104th rank on literacy and numeracy indicator, compared to China’s 40th rank.

The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), which assesses after every three years the domain knowledge of 15-year-old students in reading, mathematics, science and finance, revealed that students in China performed above the OECD average in 2015. Moreover, one in four students in China are top performers in mathematics, having an ability to formulate complex situations mathematically. Further, China outperforms all the other participating countries in financial literacy, by having a high ability to analyse complex finance products. For India, the comparable data is not available as it was not a participating country in PISA 2015.

abroad, study
Representational image.

However, in India, the Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) 2017 provides data for rural youth, aged 14-18, with respect to their abilities to lead productive lives as adults. According to this survey, only about half of the 14-year-old children in the sample could read English sentences, and more than half of the students surveyed could not do basic arithmetic operations, like division. For basic financial calculations, such as managing a budget or making a purchase decision, less than two-thirds could do the correct calculations.

With regard to the higher education system, both India and China dominate the number of tertiary degree holders because of their large population size, but when it comes to the percentage of the population holding tertiary degrees, only about 10 per cent and 8 per cent of the population possess university degrees in China and India, respectively. By contrast, in Japan, almost 50 per cent of the population holds a tertiary degree, and in the United States, 31 per cent of the population hold a tertiary degree.

In terms of the international recognition of universities, the Times Higher Education (THE) World University Ranking for 2019 places seven of the China’s universities in the top 200, compared to none for India. The global university rankings, which are based on various performance metrices, pertaining to teaching, research, citations, international outlook and industrial income, shows progress for several of China’s low-ranked universities, largely driven by improvements in its citations.

In fact, the Tsinghua University has overtaken the National University of Singapore (NUS) to become the best university in Asia due to improvements in its citations, institutional income and increased share of international staff, students and co-authored publications.

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While India has progressed in terms of massification of education, there is still a lot which needs to be done when it comes to catching up with the China’s educational outcomes. China’s early start in strengthening its primary and secondary education systems has given it an edge over India in terms of higher education. Moreover, Chinese government strategies are designed in line with the criterion used in major world university rankings, especially emphasis is on the two factors which weigh heavily in the rankings — publications and international students.

The relentless publications drive, which is very evident in China, is weak in India and has led to a growing gap in the number of publications contributed by the two countries. Further, China enrolled about 292,611 foreign students in 2011 from 194 countries, while India currently only has 46,144 foreign students enrolled in its higher education institutions, coming from 166 countries. The large number of international enrollments in China is a reflection of its state policies granting high scholarships to foreign students.

To catch up with China, India needs to lay emphasis on improving its educational outcomes. Massification drive for education has helped India raise its student enrollments, but a lot needs to be done when it comes to global recognition for its universities. Further, it needs to focus on building the foundation skills which are acquired by students at the school age, poor fundamental skills flow through the student life, affecting adversely the quality of education system. (IANS)