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Men Have Different Idea of Women’s Beauty

There were only two things they could agree on: green eyes and a small chin, reports femalefirst.co.uk

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Men Have Different Idea of Women's Beauty
Men Have Different Idea of Women's Beauty. Pixabay

Men have an entirely different take on what makes a woman beautiful, according to a latest survey.

Men prefer blonde hair, full lips, and strong cheekbones, but also a petite nose, less prominent forehead and finer eyebrows. Women on the other hand, find raven hair, a stronger nose and forehead profile, strong brows and narrower bone structure as the epitome of beauty.

There were only two things they could agree on: green eyes and a small chin, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

In the survey, conducted by beauty retailer escentual.com, men and women were asked to build up their perfect face from the features of some of the most beautiful women in the world.

Green eyes
Green Eyes were one of those two things on which everybody agreed regarding a woman’s beauty. Pixabay

The most popular features that men picked were Shakira’s cascading blonde hair, Miranda Kerr’s button nose, the forehead of Jennifer Aniston, Kate Middleton’s pronounced eyebrows and Angelina Jolie’s cheekbones as well as her full lips.

In a stark contrast, women’s selections for the perfect female face comprise Freida Pinto’s glossy black mane, Keira Knightley’s refined cheekbones, Cara Delevingne’s bushy bold brows, Natalie Portman’s imposing forehead, Blake Lively’s strong nose and Scarlett Johansson’s voluptuous pout.

Both genders agreed on the appeal of actresses Mila Kunis and Megan Fox. However, Kunis’ alluring green eyes were voted as the most beautiful by 52 percent of men and 51 percent of the women respondents. They also concurred that Megan Fox’s small, defined chin was the most attractive. (Bollywood Country)

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Here’s Why Women Should Not Dine After 6 PM

Women who dine late in the evening are likely to develop heart diseases

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Women should not consume higher proportionate of calories late in the evening. Pixabay

Women who consume a higher proportion of their daily calories late in the evening are more likely to be at risk of cardiovascular disease than women who do not, researchers have warned.

For the study, the research team assessed the cardiovascular health of 112 women using the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 measures at the beginning of the study and one year later.

Life’s Simple 7 represents the risk factors that people can improve through lifestyle changes to help achieve ideal cardiovascular health and include not smoking, being physically active, eating healthy foods and controlling body weight, along with measuring cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar levels.

A heart health score based on meeting the Life’s Simple 7 was computed.

“The preliminary results indicate that intentional eating that is mindful of the timing and proportion of calories in evening meals may represent a simple, modifiable behaviour that can help lower heart disease risk,” said study lead author Nour Makarem from Columbia University in the US.

During the study, participants of the study kept electronic food diaries by computer or cell phone to report what, how much and when they ate for one week at the beginning of the study and for one week 12 months later.

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Women should consume less calories in the evening for a healthy heart. Pixabay

Data from the food diary completed by each woman was used to determine the relationship between heart health and the timing of when they ate.

Researchers found that, after 6 p.m. with every one per cent calories consumed heart health declined, especially for women.

These women were found more likely to have higher blood pressure, higher body mass index and poorer long-term control of blood sugar.

Similar findings occurred with every one per cent increase in calories consumed after 8 p.m.

Also Read- Study Associates Air Pollution With Heart Attack

“It is never too early to start thinking about your heart health whether you’re 20 or 30 or 40 or moving into the 60s and 70s. If you’re healthy now or if you have heart disease, you can always do more. That goes along with being heart smart and heart healthy,” said study researcher Kristin Newby, Professor at Duke University.

The study is scheduled to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019 from November 16-18 in Philadelphia, US. (IANS)