Tuesday March 19, 2019

Menstrual Age of Mother Directly Linked with Son’s Puberty

Puberty at a younger age has also been linked to increased risk in later adult life of diseases such as breast and testicular cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease

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Puberty
Mother's menstrual age linked to son's puberty: Study, Pixabay

The age at which a young woman experiences her first menstruation is associated with the age at which her son experiences puberty, according to a latest research.

While it has been known for some time that mothers’ age at puberty is associated with their daughters’, much less was known about the link with their sons’ age at puberty.

The findings, published in the journal Human Reproduction, suggested that mothers who reported having their first menstrual bleed earlier than their peers had sons with signs of puberty starting earlier than their peers.

“The relationship between first menstrual bleeding in mothers and the first menstrual bleeding in their daughters has been reported in several studies,” said Nis Brix, researcher at the Aarhus University in Denmark.

“The novelty of our study was to include other markers of pubertal development in daughters, such as different stages of breast and pubic hair development. The relationship in sons has only been sparsely investigated,” Brix added.

Puberty
Representational image, Pixabay

For the study, the researchers examined 15,822 children and interviewed the mothers twice during pregnancy and asked them to fill in a questionnaire when their children were seven.

“The largest difference was when hair started growing in the armpits, which started, on average, approximately two-and-a-half months earlier; their voices broke nearly two months earlier, acne started to develop nearly two months earlier and their first ejaculation of semen was nearly one and a half months earlier,” Brix said.

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However, in girls, the largest difference was seen in breast development, which started up to six months earlier in those whose mothers had experienced earlier periods than their peers, or up to four months later in girls whose mothers had started puberty later than their peers.

Puberty at a younger age has also been linked to increased risk in later adult life of diseases such as breast and testicular cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. (IANS)

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Conflicts with Your Mother in Childhood May Reduce Purpose in Life Later

Only the child's perspective seemed to matter

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Mother-daughter conflict ups suicide risk in abused teen girls: Study. Pixabay

Children who have more conflict with their mothers during early years of elementary school may be at difficulty finding a sense of purpose in life during adulthood, suggests a new research.

A sense of purpose involves having the belief that one has a stable, far-reaching aim that organises and stimulates behaviour and goals to progress towards that objective.

The study showed children who clash with their mothers may struggle to find purpose as adults.

“One of the biggest takeaway messages from these findings is the path to a purposeful life starts early, well before we start to consider different goals for life,” said Patrick Hill, Associate Professor at Washington University in St. Louis.

“The research shows that it’s the child’s perspective of conflict that has the greatest effect on later sense of purpose and what matters most in this equation is the child’s relationship with his or her mother,” Hill said.

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Clashing with your mother can reduce purpose in life later: Study. Pixabay

For the study, researchers included 1,074 students (50 per cent female) and their parents, all of whom self-reported on levels of parent-child conflict in their families during grades 1-5.

The findings, published in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence, showed children who reported conflicted relations early in life with fathers predicted less life satisfaction in emerging adulthood.

But the negative impact on sense of purpose was not nearly as strong as it was found to be among children who reported early conflicts with mothers.

Also Read- E-cigarettes Found More Effective in Helping Smokers Quit: Study

Only the child’s perspective seemed to matter.

Understanding the content of conversations, including how are parents demonstrating the value of a purposeful life, or how are they helping children to define and pursue their own purposeful paths can help us all understand how conversations matter to children in our lives, said Leah Schultz, doctoral student at the varsity. (IANS)