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Mesmerizing Dussehra art exhibition in Mysore

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By Nithin Sridhar

Mysuru: A mesmerizing exhibition of arts and crafts was organized in the city’s Suchitra Gallery, located at Kalamandir as part of the ongoing Dasara (also known as Dussehra) celebrations. The Dasara art exhibition was attended and praised by the locals who visited the gallery.

9The exhibition, which has been organized by the ‘Lalita Kale Mattu Karakushala Upasamiti’- The Dasara sub-committee for Arts and Crafts, is showcasing more than 150 exhibits prepared by both amateurs as well as senior artists from across Karnataka.

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Speaking to NewsGram, Mr. V. A. Deshpande, Former Dean of CAVA (Chamarajendra Academy of Visual Arts) and Former Secretary of Lalita Kale sub-committee, said that this is the fourth edition of the exhibition and exhibits from eight categories have been included.

7The eight categories include: Traditional paintings like Mysore style and Tanjore Style paintings, Contemporary paintings, Traditional sculptures, Contemporary sculptures, Posters, Graphic prints, Crafts, and Photographs. The exhibition, which was inaugurated on October 14 is attracting an average of 150 visitors per day.

6Traditional category paintings included beautiful paintings of Narasimha, Lakshmi-Narayana, and Goddess Lalita. Posters on the themes of female foeticide, drunken driving, etc. were also exhibited.

10Other beautiful exhibits under painting categories included a beautiful painting of Buddha, a painting of a sculpture of a dancing goddess, a painting of a woman covered in scarf sitting in front of the mirror, and a painting titled ‘Aase’ (desire) that depicted a Ugra goddess at the front and a small girl at the background.

2In the category of Sculptures, a sculpture that depicted a water pot with a tap won the prize for combing elements of old and the new. A sculpture titled ‘Kutumba’ (family), and another depicting a couple in a romantic kiss were beautifully made.

4Among the crafts that were exhibited, dolls of Krishna and Gopis performing Raas Lila were eye-catching. Another well-made craft was the icon of Lord Ganapati.

5Apart from the exhibition, a 2-day camp of senior artists on October 16-17 has been organized in the gallery by the Dasara sub-committee. Deshpande said that the artists in the camp are painting on the theme of farmer suicides.

11Siddharame Gowda, an artist from Salgundi, near Mysore, who is participating in the camp, told NewsGram that through his painting, he will be portraying how farmers are the very basis of our society and how if farmers continue to die, the whole society itself will be uprooted.

3When asked about what other activities the sub-committee has planned this year, Deshpande shared that the funds allotted to the committee this year are only around 7 lakhs, which is much less than previous years. Dasara celebration as a whole has been scaled down this year following the drought and farmer suicides across the state.

8He added that the committee has organized two other activities on October 18, Sunday: A spot painting competition for children and felicitation of five senior artists. The exhibition will end on October 21.

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10 Indian Author’s Books Selected for JCB Prize for Literature

Of the 10 novels, the jury will shortlist five, which will be announced on October 3. The five shortlisted writers receive Rs 1 lakh each.

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10 novels of 'enormous diversity' vying for India's richest book prize.

Ten outstanding Indian novels in English along with translations from Indian languages by veterans as well as debut authors were longlisted on Wednesday for the Rs 25 lakh JCB Prize for Literature, with its literary director highlighting “enormous diversity” in the submissions.

The longlist features two novels in translation: “Poonachi or The Story of a Black Goat”, originally written in Tamil by Perumal Murugan and Malayalam novel “Jasmine Days” by Benny Daniel; two novels by debut women writers: “Latitudes of Longing” by Shubhangi Swarup and “Empire” by Devi Yesodharan; and two novels by authors previously nominated for the Man Booker Prize: “All The Lives We Never Lived” by Anuradha Roy and “The Book of Chocolate Saints” by Jeet Thayil.

They are joined by veteran writers Nayantara Sahgal and Kiran Nagarkar, whose “When The Moon Shines by Day” and “Jasoda” released to prominence and reflected the burden of society in 2017.

While the entry of Amitabha Bagchi’s “Half the Night is Gone” that explores the inner and outer lives of the men in two families, was almost expected, Chandrahas Choudhury’s “Clouds” was the surprise novel in the longlist.

Literature
Excerpt from Amitabha Bagchi’s “Above Average”

Entries for the inaugural edition of the prize, an initiative of the earthmoving and construction equipment company JCB India Ltd, came from writers in 19 states and 22 per cent of them were translations.

“The most striking thing about the entries we received is their enormous diversity. We had entries from 17 states and eight languages. The oldest author was nearly seven decades older than the youngest. There were books about ancient Indian history and mythology, books about ecological disasters, books about religious strife and the situation of women. All in all, it was a very exciting set of books, which represents the full set of possibilities of the novel,” Rana Dasgupta, Literary Director of the prize told IANS.

The British Indian novelist and essayist further noted that many of the translations were from Malayalam and Kannada. He said that it is no longer possible to “generalise” as novels in Indian languages are “as cosmopolitan as any other”.

“Writers in these languages set their novels in locations all across the world, and they have a great contemporaneity of form, character and language. In future years, translated fiction will make up a much greater share of entries to the Prize,” Dasgupta maintained.

Scholar Rohan Murthy, writers Priyamvada Natarajan and Vivek Shanbhag, and author-translator Arshia Sattar comprise the jury with film director Deepa Mehta chairing the panel.

Literature
Rana Dasgupta, is himself a celebrated author. Flickr

Of the 10 novels, the jury will shortlist five, which will be announced on October 3. The five shortlisted writers receive Rs 1 lakh each.

The final award will be presented to the writer of the winning novel on October 27. If the winning work is a translation, the translator will be awarded an additional Rs 5 lakh.

The winning novelist will be awarded Rs 25 lakh, the highest for a prize of its kind in India.

Ten outstanding Indian novels in English along with translations from Indian languages by veterans as well as debut authors were longlisted on Wednesday for the Rs 25 lakh JCB Prize for Literature, with its literary director highlighting “enormous diversity” in the submissions.

The longlist features two novels in translation: “Poonachi or The Story of a Black Goat”, originally written in Tamil by Perumal Murugan and Malayalam novel “Jasmine Days” by Benny Daniel; two novels by debut women writers: “Latitudes of Longing” by Shubhangi Swarup and “Empire” by Devi Yesodharan; and two novels by authors previously nominated for the Man Booker Prize: “All The Lives We Never Lived” by Anuradha Roy and “The Book of Chocolate Saints” by Jeet Thayil.

They are joined by veteran writers Nayantara Sahgal and Kiran Nagarkar, whose “When The Moon Shines by Day” and “Jasoda” released to prominence and reflected the burden of society in 2017.

Literature
Anuradha Roys’s ‘All The Lives We Never Lived’. Goodreads

While the entry of Amitabha Bagchi’s “Half the Night is Gone” that explores the inner and outer lives of the men in two families, was almost expected, Chandrahas Choudhury’s “Clouds” was the surprise novel in the longlist.

Entries for the inaugural edition of the prize, an initiative of the earthmoving and construction equipment company JCB India Ltd, came from writers in 19 states and 22 per cent of them were translations.

“The most striking thing about the entries we received is their enormous diversity. We had entries from 17 states and eight languages. The oldest author was nearly seven decades older than the youngest. There were books about ancient Indian history and mythology, books about ecological disasters, books about religious strife and the situation of women. All in all, it was a very exciting set of books, which represents the full set of possibilities of the novel,” Rana Dasgupta, Literary Director of the prize told IANS.

The British Indian novelist and essayist further noted that many of the translations were from Malayalam and Kannada. He said that it is no longer possible to “generalise” as novels in Indian languages are “as cosmopolitan as any other”.

“Writers in these languages set their novels in locations all across the world, and they have a great contemporaneity of form, character and language. In future years, translated fiction will make up a much greater share of entries to the Prize,” Dasgupta maintained.

literature
The final award will be presented to the writer of the winning novel on October 27. If the winning work is a translation, the translator will be awarded an additional Rs 5 lakh. Pixabay

Scholar Rohan Murthy, writers Priyamvada Natarajan and Vivek Shanbhag, and author-translator Arshia Sattar comprise the jury with film director Deepa Mehta chairing the panel.

Also Read: India Provides Good Future for Books Than Other Parts of The World

Of the 10 novels, the jury will shortlist five, which will be announced on October 3. The five shortlisted writers receive Rs 1 lakh each.

The final award will be presented to the writer of the winning novel on October 27. If the winning work is a translation, the translator will be awarded an additional Rs 5 lakh.

The winning novelist will be awarded Rs 25 lakh, the highest for a prize of its kind in India. (IANS)