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Mob violence in Manipur kills three, injures many

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Imphal: A mob violence erupted in Manipur. The uproar was over three bills which the state assembly had passed lately. Officials stated on Tuesday that, while three people lost their lives, many sustained serious injuries.

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credits: facenfacts

The violence took place on Monday night in Churchandpur, where an indefinite curfew has been imposed to control the law and order situation.

The officials said the mob comprised of members of tribal students organisations protesting against the Manipur government’s adoption of three landmark bills — Protection of Manipur People Bill 2015, Manipur Land Revenue and Land Reforms (seventh amendment) Bill 2015, and Manipur Shops and Establishment (second amendment) Bill 2015.

The three bills were unanimously passed in the assembly on Monday after the ruling Congress signed an agreement with the Joint Committee on Inner Line Permit System (JCILPS) on August 25 to enact three laws to protect the interest of the indigenous people.

The mob attacked the residence of five Congress lawmakers, including that of Health and Family Welfare Minister Phungzathang Tonsing and outer Manipur Lok Sabha member Thangsoi Baite.

The mob also set the vehicle of Churachandpur Deputy Commissioner Lunminthang Haokip afire and prevented fire engines from dousing the flames, even as police were forced to resort to a baton charge.

However, none of the lawmakers were at their residences. They were all in state capital Imphal attending the special legislative assembly session.

Tribal civil society groups opposed the introduction of the bills, saying they overlapped with some points in the Manipur Hill People Administration Regulation Act, 1947, meant to safeguard the interest of tribesmen in the hill areas of Manipur.

 

(With inputs from IANS)

 

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Know How Teenagers Who Feel Empowered are Less Likely to Commit Violence

Teens who feel empowered less likely to bully, harrass or commit sexual violence

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teengers bully
Researchers have found that teenagers who feel personally empowered are less likely to bully, harass or commit acts of sexual violence. Pixabay

Dear parents, please take note. Researchers have found that teenagers who feel personally empowered are less likely to bully, harass or commit acts of sexual violence.

The study, published in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence, also found that teens who think their friends support violence prevention and healthy relationships are less likely to mistreat their peers.

“Coping mechanisms that help adolescents thrive and do well, even in the face of stress and adversity, are important to preventing interpersonal violence,” said study lead author Victoria Banyard from Rutgers University in the US.

“This is an important finding, as studies of bullying typically examine risk factors rather than protective factors,” Banyard added.

teengers bully
Teengers may face online bullying, harassment, racial bullying, and unwanted sexual contact. Pixabay

For the findings, the researchers surveyed a set of 2,232 middle and high school students online during the school year by seeking their level of agreement or disagreement with statements including “If I am feeling sad, I can cheer myself up,” “My opinion is important because it could someday make a difference in my community,” “I work hard now to make a good future for myself,” “I am comfortable being with people who are of a different race than I am,” and others.

They were asked about bullying and harassment, alcohol use, positive social norms related to violence prevention, and a combination of interpersonal strengths.

According to the researchers, the teens were surveyed again six months later.

The findings suggest that bullying, harassment and sexual violence can be reduced when adolescents learn to cope with stress, build community connections, engage with individuals from diverse backgrounds and feel empowered and able to build a positive future.

Also Read- Diarrhea: A Prominent Symptom of COVID-19

According to the researchers, adults can help young people develop these strengths. Positive conversations with teens about healthy relationships support the positive social norms we know are important.

Adolescence is a high-risk age for perpetration of different forms of peer-based violence including in-person and online bullying, harassment, racial bullying, and unwanted sexual contact, the researchers explained. (IANS)