Friday December 13, 2019

Mobile phones can actually cause cancer: Study

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A man talks on his mobile phone in the village of Devmali in the desert state of Rajasthan, India June 14, 2016. REUTERS/Himanshu Sharma

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London, July 25,2015:  Your fears are not completely unfounded. Mobile phones can actually cause cancer, says a study.

A metabolic imbalance caused by radiation from your wireless devices could be the link to a number of health risks, such as various neuro-degenerative diseases and cancer, the study suggested.

This imbalance, also known as oxidative stress, is defined as “an imbalance between the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and antioxidant defense” by the authors.

The hazardous effects of radiation from wireless devices could be realized through the “classical mechanisms” of oxidative impairments in living cells, the researchers said.

The study, published in the journal Electromagnetic Biology & Medicine, explored experimental data on the metabolic effects of low-intensity Radio Frequency Radiation (RFR) in living cells.

Study co-author Igor Yakymenko from the National University for Food Technologies said the oxidative stress due to RFR exposure could explain not only cancer, but also other minor disorders such as headache, fatigue, and skin irritation, which could develop after long-term exposure.

“These data are a clear sign of the real risks this kind of radiation poses for human health,” Yakymenko said.

“ROS are often produced in cells due to aggressive environments, and can also be provoked by ordinary wireless radiation,” he added.

In 2011, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified RFR as a possible carcinogen for humans. But clear molecular mechanisms of such effects of RFR were a bottleneck in acceptance of a reality of risk.

Yakymenko and his colleagues call for a precautionary approach in using wireless technologies, such as cell phones and wireless internet. (IANS)

 

Next Story

Light Alcohol Consumption Might Also Increase Cancer Risk: Study

The researchers found an almost linear association between cancer risk and alcohol consumption

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A light level of Alcohol Consumption at 10-drink-year point, for example, one drink per day for 10 years or two drinks per day for five years would increase cancer risk by five per cent, the findings showed. Pixabay

If you thought one-two drinks a day would not do any harm, think again. Researchers in Japan have found that even light Alcohol consumption might increase the cancer risk.

In the study published in the journal Cancer, the overall cancer risk appeared to be the lowest at zero alcohol consumption. The elevated risk appeared to be explained by alcohol-related cancer risk across relatively common sites, including the colorectum, stomach, breast, prostate and esophagus.

“In Japan, the primary cause of death is cancer,” said one of the researchers Masayoshi Zaitsu from The University of Tokyo. “Given the current burden of overall cancer incidence, we should further encourage promoting public education about alcohol-related cancer risk,” Zaitsu said.

The team examined clinical data on 63,232 patients with cancer and 63,232 controls matched for sex, age, hospital admission date, and admitting hospital. The data was gathered from 33 general hospitals in Japan.

All participants reported their average daily amount of standardised alcohol units and the duration of drinking.

One standardised drink containing 23 grams of ethanol was equivalent to one 180-ml cup of Japanese sake, one 500-ml bottle of beer, one 180-ml glass of wine, or one 60-ml cup of whiskey.

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If you thought one-two drinks a day would not do any harm, think again. Researchers in Japan have found that even light Alcohol consumption might increase the cancer risk. Pixabay

The researchers found an almost linear association between cancer risk and alcohol consumption.

A light level of drinking at 10-drink-year point, for example, one drink per day for 10 years or two drinks per day for five years would increase cancer risk by five per cent, the findings showed.

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Those who drank two or fewer drinks a day had an elevated cancer risk regardless of how long they had consumed alcohol. Also, analyses classified by sex, drinking/smoking behaviours and occupational class mostly showed the same patterns. (IANS)