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Modern Slavery: India accounts for almost 40 percent of the worldwide labourers

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Modern Slavery
Modern slavery. Image source: Wikipedia
  • Global Slavery Index states, about 45.8 million victims of modern slavery are present in the world and India contributes to 18.3 million of them
  • Modern Slavery generates about $150 billion in illegal businesses
  • The Indian Government is coming up with a new comprehensive bill to address the issue of modern slavery

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According to the Global Slavery Index, India has a staggering number of 18 million people trapped in modern forms of enslavement. Modern slavery, as defined by the Walk Free Foundation, is “when one person possesses or controls another person in such a way as to significantly deprive that person of their individual liberty, with the intention of exploiting that person through their use, profit, transfer or disposal.” 45.8 million people are boggled down under the curse of Modern Slavery, a hike of 28 percent as compared to two years ago.

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Walk Free Foundation, famous for coining the Global Slavery Index, was initiated by Australian philanthropists Andrew and Nicola Forrest, and now has partners to enhance the impact of its campaigns in many parts of the world, like Rainforest Action Network, Global March Against Child Labor and Human Rights Watch.

Mining in Africa. Image source: Wikipedia
Mining in Africa. Image source: Wikipedia

Walk Free Foundation claims that modern slavery occurs in almost every country, under the misleading blankets of normalcy. Forced and bonded labor, sexual slavery and human trafficking, which come under the umbrella of human trafficking, have generated $150 worldwide.

“It’s where a person cannot leave their place of existence. Either their passports are taken, or there is a threat of violence against them or a member of their families, so they are stuck there. And, what’s worse, is they’re treated akin to a farm animal,” says Andrew Forrest, chairman of the Walk Free Foundation.

The most common form of bondage is financial debts. These modern day slaves owe massive sums of money to their masters, and due to the growing inflation, they are indebted for their entire lives. “I will be free only when I die,” says one laborer. The revenue that they create through their hard work is all pocketed by the slavers, and they’re only provided meager portions of meals. The fact that majority of these laborers are forced into bonded work by someone they already know or trust is truly heartbreaking.

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Child labour in India. Image source: Wikipedia
Child labour in India. Image source: Wikipedia

Child labor is often abound in these areas, and some are forced to beg on the streets with their limbs cut or eyes blinded to invite pity from pedestrians. They almost always never receive any of the money they earn, and are brainwashed with the most vivid forms of fear to prevent them to report to anyone. According to the Walk Free Foundation, “one in three detected victims” of modern slavery is a child.

Traces of modern slavery are ubiquitous in today’s world, and more importantly, in all sorts of industries. From the fishing industries in Thailand, where victims are forced to fish in small, uncomfortable boats for 20 hours a day, and receive next to nothing in return, all the way to human trafficked victims trapped in Cannabis factories underground and often don’t see the light of day.

The BBC reports that Shandra Woworuntu, an activist against human trafficking was forced into sexual slavery when she traveled to the USA from Indonesia in 2001. She eventually managed to flee her oppressors and helped the FBI locate the brothel where she was forced to work.

India’s figure of 18.3 million dwarfs China’s 3.39 million and Pakistan’s 2.13 million. Even though this news appears discouraging, Walk Free Foundation reports it has made tremendous progress in addressing the issue of modern slavery. “Its (India’s) Prime Minister, its cabinet ministers, its various states and its major Faith Leaders are making their intolerance for its continuance of this practice clear,” says Andrew Forrest. India’s Minister for Women & Children unveiled a draft of the country’s first-ever comprehensive anti-human trafficking law, which would treat survivors as victims in need of assistance and protection, rather than criminals, Thomson Reuters Foundation reported.

-by Saurabh Bodas

Saurabh is pursuing engineering and is an intern at NewsGram. Twitter handle: @saurabhbodas96

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  • Shivang Goel

    people here are more concerned with the issues like Malya’s bankruptcy and actually the rural issues are often or I say most of the times neglected, no wonder why India tops pollution and population graph,when children here arent expected to learn but to work ,unwillingly but forcefully

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    There should be more organisations like the Walk Free to ensure that the labors are well managed or not. Also sexual slavery is a very serious issue to be taken care of

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India: Sugar Mills, Distilleries under The Scanner of Special Task Force of UP Police for Links with Hooch Syndicates

Industrial alcohol allegedly used in hooch is distilled ethanol

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India, Sugar Mills, Distilleries
A few sugar mills and distilleries have come under the scanner of the Special Task Force of the UP police. Pixabay

As more than a hundred people died in ‘poisonous hooch’ tragedies in Uttar Pradesh during the past one year, a few sugar mills and distilleries have come under the scanner of the Special Task Force of the UP police. Working round the clock to bust ‘killer syndicates’ supplying cheap industrial alcohol to bootleggers and gangs involved in manufacturing of illicit liquor, STF has seized more than 10,000 litres of rectified spirit in raids across the state in the past one month.

Industrial alcohol allegedly used in hooch is distilled ethanol and is usually used in manufacturing of paints, fragrance, printing ink and coating. As it is cheaper, the liquor syndicates get it smuggled from distilled ethanol manufacturing units. On June 16, STF seized 5,750 litres of rectified spirit (high concentration alcohol) from the possession of a big time crime syndicate active in Lucknow and Kanpur.

The STF rounded up the kingpin, Suraj Lal Yadav, along with six other members of the gang. During interrogation it was discovered that Yadav was well-connected with some distilleries in Haryana. Large quantities of industrial alcohol was smuggled out of Haryana and pushed into hooch manufacturing dens in UP.

Concerned about frequents deaths in UP due to consumption of poisonous hooch, Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath launched a statewide crackdown on illicit liquor manufacturing gangs after 21 people died in a hooch tragedy in Barabanki two months ago. The STF, considered the state’s premiere crime busting agency, subsequently geared up to intercept scores of tankers and private vehicles being pushed into UP from Delhi and Haryana.

India, Sugar Mills, Distilleries
A few sugar mills and distilleries have come under the scanner of the Special Task Force of the UP police. Pixabay

“The syndicate involved in smuggling of rectified spirit has spread its tentacles in the state. Even murders have taken place in disputes relating to the smuggling. But our raiding parties are determined to bust the gangs. Innumerable cases have been registered by us in the past one-and-a-half years,” said Amitabh Yash, Inspector General(IG) of STF.

Even though the STF, after rounding up the accused handed over the investigation of the case to the district police, the agency is said to have the most precise data on organised crime in North India.

“We seldom investigate the cases as it involves prolonged court work, so our main aim is focused on cracking heinous crimes, particularly organised by crime syndicates. At the moment, gangs involved in illicit trade of hooch are our target,” said Amitabh Yash, known for his skills in dealing with underworld operations and syndicate crimes. When asked whether a few officials of the excise department and a couple of distilleries could be linked with smugglers of rectified spirit, the IG said a report was given in this connection to the government.

While high excise duty makes liquor expensive, hooch, on the other hand, is available for less than Rs 20 per bottle. At places the rates are less than even Rs 10 per liter. A report, in connection with the Saharanpur hooch tragedy in February 2019 which took the lives of over 50 people, reveals that the quantity of rectified spirit mixed in the drink was so high that it had the effect of poison.

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The report says that rectified spirit was smuggled by criminal gangs which were hand-in-glove with local authorities.

“The gangs have links in distilleries and chemical factories from where industrial alcohol is smuggled out at a very cheap price. It is later re-packed in drums and transported to hideouts of manufacturers (of illicit liquor),” said a source in the police.

With widespread sale of hooch across UP, CM Yogi Adityanath has instructed DGP O.P. Singh to take stringent measures against the culprits and ensure that police secures conviction of those accused who are put on trial in cases of hooch smuggling or hooch-related deaths. (IANS)