Monday September 24, 2018
Home India Modern Slaver...

Modern Slavery: India accounts for almost 40 percent of the worldwide labourers

2
//
854
Modern Slavery
Modern slavery. Image source: Wikipedia
Republish
Reprint
  • Global Slavery Index states, about 45.8 million victims of modern slavery are present in the world and India contributes to 18.3 million of them
  • Modern Slavery generates about $150 billion in illegal businesses
  • The Indian Government is coming up with a new comprehensive bill to address the issue of modern slavery

Watch this 2 minute video:

https://youtu.be/0K2WiUImm80

According to the Global Slavery Index, India has a staggering number of 18 million people trapped in modern forms of enslavement. Modern slavery, as defined by the Walk Free Foundation, is “when one person possesses or controls another person in such a way as to significantly deprive that person of their individual liberty, with the intention of exploiting that person through their use, profit, transfer or disposal.” 45.8 million people are boggled down under the curse of Modern Slavery, a hike of 28 percent as compared to two years ago.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook: NewsGram

Walk Free Foundation, famous for coining the Global Slavery Index, was initiated by Australian philanthropists Andrew and Nicola Forrest, and now has partners to enhance the impact of its campaigns in many parts of the world, like Rainforest Action Network, Global March Against Child Labor and Human Rights Watch.

Mining in Africa. Image source: Wikipedia
Mining in Africa. Image source: Wikipedia

Walk Free Foundation claims that modern slavery occurs in almost every country, under the misleading blankets of normalcy. Forced and bonded labor, sexual slavery and human trafficking, which come under the umbrella of human trafficking, have generated $150 worldwide.

“It’s where a person cannot leave their place of existence. Either their passports are taken, or there is a threat of violence against them or a member of their families, so they are stuck there. And, what’s worse, is they’re treated akin to a farm animal,” says Andrew Forrest, chairman of the Walk Free Foundation.

The most common form of bondage is financial debts. These modern day slaves owe massive sums of money to their masters, and due to the growing inflation, they are indebted for their entire lives. “I will be free only when I die,” says one laborer. The revenue that they create through their hard work is all pocketed by the slavers, and they’re only provided meager portions of meals. The fact that majority of these laborers are forced into bonded work by someone they already know or trust is truly heartbreaking.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter: @newsgram1

Child labour in India. Image source: Wikipedia
Child labour in India. Image source: Wikipedia

Child labor is often abound in these areas, and some are forced to beg on the streets with their limbs cut or eyes blinded to invite pity from pedestrians. They almost always never receive any of the money they earn, and are brainwashed with the most vivid forms of fear to prevent them to report to anyone. According to the Walk Free Foundation, “one in three detected victims” of modern slavery is a child.

Traces of modern slavery are ubiquitous in today’s world, and more importantly, in all sorts of industries. From the fishing industries in Thailand, where victims are forced to fish in small, uncomfortable boats for 20 hours a day, and receive next to nothing in return, all the way to human trafficked victims trapped in Cannabis factories underground and often don’t see the light of day.

The BBC reports that Shandra Woworuntu, an activist against human trafficking was forced into sexual slavery when she traveled to the USA from Indonesia in 2001. She eventually managed to flee her oppressors and helped the FBI locate the brothel where she was forced to work.

India’s figure of 18.3 million dwarfs China’s 3.39 million and Pakistan’s 2.13 million. Even though this news appears discouraging, Walk Free Foundation reports it has made tremendous progress in addressing the issue of modern slavery. “Its (India’s) Prime Minister, its cabinet ministers, its various states and its major Faith Leaders are making their intolerance for its continuance of this practice clear,” says Andrew Forrest. India’s Minister for Women & Children unveiled a draft of the country’s first-ever comprehensive anti-human trafficking law, which would treat survivors as victims in need of assistance and protection, rather than criminals, Thomson Reuters Foundation reported.

-by Saurabh Bodas

Saurabh is pursuing engineering and is an intern at NewsGram. Twitter handle: @saurabhbodas96

ALSO READ:

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • Shivang Goel

    people here are more concerned with the issues like Malya’s bankruptcy and actually the rural issues are often or I say most of the times neglected, no wonder why India tops pollution and population graph,when children here arent expected to learn but to work ,unwillingly but forcefully

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    There should be more organisations like the Walk Free to ensure that the labors are well managed or not. Also sexual slavery is a very serious issue to be taken care of

Next Story

The Nuns In Kerala Finally Get Their Justice

Dozens of nuns, activists and advocates have protested outside a court, demanding his prosecution.

0
Church, Nun
Franco Mulakkal, bishop of the Indian city of Jalandhar, center, whom a nun has accused of rape, leaves after appearing for questioning by police in Kochi, India, Sept. 19, 2018. The bishop has denied the accusation. VOA

Indian police on Friday arrested a Catholic bishop accused by a nun of repeatedly raping her over a period of two years.

The arrest of Franco Mulakkal came after police questioned him for three days in southern Indian city of Kochi.

The nun with the Missionaries of Jesus order filed a police complaint in June accusing the bishop of raping her from 2014 to 2016.

Church, Nun
Nuns hold placards during a protest demanding justice after an alleged sexual assault of a nun by a bishop in Kochi, in the southern state of Kerala, India. VOA

Mulakkal is the bishop of the northern Indian city of Jalandhar. He denied the accusations, saying the nun was angry because he had ordered her disciplined.

Police Officer Hari Sankar told The Press Trust of India news agency that Mulakkal would appear in court.

Also Read: Indian Catholic Nuns Call Out For Justice in Kerala

Dozens of nuns, activists and advocates have protested outside a court, demanding his prosecution. (VOA)