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Monkey survives fall but triggers Nationwide Blackout in Kenya

The vervet monkey survived the fall and was turned over to Kenyan Wildlife Service, the KenGen company said

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A Vervet Monkey. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
  • A nationwide blackout was triggered in Kenya by the fall of a monkey on the transformer
  • The nationwide blackout that lasted for nearly three hours
  • The company is looking for different measures to enhance the security of the power plants

In an ill-fated incident that took place on Tuesday, June 7, a nationwide blackout was triggered in Kenya by the fall of a monkey.

The company, Kenya Electricity Generating Company  or KenGen, claims that a monkey of the Vervet species climbed onto the roof of the Gitaru Power Station. The monkey in question jumped off the roof of the power station, landing on the transformer.  The fall tripped the transformer, causing the other machines to trip on overload as well. It leaded to a loss of over 180MW.

The nationwide blackout that lasted for nearly three hours, proved detrimental for the businesses. There were some houses in Nairobi that complained of power loss even on Wednesday.

The company has posted the image in their Facebook page, KenGen Kenya about the incident with the image of the monkey.

kenGen building in Kenya. Image source: www.esi-africa.com
kenGen building in Kenya. Image source: www.esi-africa.com

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In a statement that KenGen issued, the company stated that this accident was an “isolated incident” that they deeply regretted. It also said that the power installations in the hydropower station are “ secured by electric fencing which keeps away marauding wild animals”.

The company stated that it is looking for different measures to enhance the security of the power plants.

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The vervet monkey survived the fall and was turned over to Kenyan Wildlife Service, the company said. It also uploaded a picture of the culprit on its facebook page.

KenGen is locally known for its high electricity costs. It claims that the system had been restored and is functioning to its normal capacity.

-By Devika Todi, an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: devika_todi

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61% Indian Business Leaders Fear Cybercrime Risk During Covid-19

61% of Indian business owners think their business may experience cybercrime during Covid-19

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cybercrime
SMBs believe that cybercrime is more likely to occur during Covid-19 situation than before. Pixabay

About 61 per cent of Indian business leaders and decision-makers think their business is more likely to experience a serious cybercrime during the Covid-19 situation as opposed to 45 per cent globally, said a survey on Tuesday.

About a third of small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) believe that cybecrime is more likely to occur during Covid-19 situation than before, showed the study by US-based cybersecurity company CrowdStrike.

From February to March alone, CrowdStrike found that there was a 100x increase in Covid-19 themed malicious files.

Interestingly 62 per cent of Indian businesses surveyed, the highest among all the countries surveyed, provided additional training for their staff to learn how to avoid threats and Cybercrime while working from home.

The “CrowdStrike Work Security Index” surveyed 4,048 senior decision-makers in India, Australia, France, Germany, Great Britain, Japan, Netherlands, Singapore, and the U.S across major industry sectors.

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62 per cent of Indian businesses surveyed provided additional training for their staff to learn how to avoid threats while working from home. Pixabay

The survey looked into the attitudes and behaviours towards cybersecurity during the Covid-19 situation.

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It included responses from 526 Indian decision-makers across small, medium and large business enterprises.

The survey revealed that a large majority of respondents around the globe are now working remotely, with more than half of them working remotely directly as a result of the pandemic.

This, in turn has given rise to the use of personal devices, including laptops and mobile devices, for work purposes, with 60 per cent of respondents reporting that they are using personal devices to complete work — with countries like Singapore and India even reaching 70 per cent or higher in personal device usage. (IANS)

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New York Times Devotes Entire Front Page to COVID-19 Victims

The names of 1,000 of the COVID-19 victims were published on the front page of New York Times

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New York Times
The New York Times dedicated its front page to the names of COVID-19 victims. Pixabay

The New York Times has devoted its entire front page to the names of 1,000 of the COVID-19 victims as the US approaches nearly 100,000 virus deaths, the current highest in the world as suggested by COVID-19 Information & Resources.

The Sunday edition’s front page comprises a simple list of names and personal details taken from obituaries around the US, the BBC reported.

The headline is “US deaths near 100,000, an incalculable loss”, with a sub-heading that reads: “They were not simply names on a list. They were us.”

New York state, the epicentre of the US coronavirus pandemic, has recorded 385,000 confirmed cases, with 23,195 deaths, according to the Johns Hopkins University.

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Newspaper article titled “A New Physics Based on Einstein” published in ”The New York Times” on November 25, 1919. Wikimedia Commons

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New York City accounts for 197,000 infections and 16,149 fatalities.

As of Sunday, the US registered the world’s highest number of cases and deaths at 1,622,670 and 97,087, respectively. (IANS)

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Reimagining Business Models for a Post-Pandemic World

The idea is suggested by a book named "It's Logical: Innovating Profitable Business Models"

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The disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic will cause a drastic reimagining of business models in going forward. Pixabay

The disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic will entail a drastic reimagining of business models in going forward says a new book on the subject that proposes frameworks with Design Thinking as the backbone for creating win-win situations.

“Today, more than ever, there is a strong need for re-imagining the way business needs to be conducted through deep empathy and exploring win-win situations for all stakeholders involved,” writes Kaustubh Dhargalkar, an entrepreneur-turned-academician, innovation evangelist and start-up mentor, in “It’s Logical: Innovating Profitable Business Models” published by Sage and which is available as an ebook on Amazon.

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The book is available as an ebook on Amazon. Wikimedia Commons

To this end, the book proposes “frameworks (with Design Thinking as the backbone) for creating win-win situations to visualize sustainable business models in times to come, which should prove useful in the prevailing, unprecedented circumstances”.

Laced with multiple real life studies, the book advocates that innovation is not about flash in the pan ideas; it is driven by pure logic. It further explains how to map the ecosystem to understand synergies for creating innovative offerings.

In his foreword, Sudhakar Nadkarni (Founder, Industrial Design Centre at IIT-Bombay; Founder, Department of Design at IIT-Guwahati) writes: “It takes great effort and a long time to develop an innovative culture. Innovation, as is often said, does not fall from the heavens. It takes vision and a strong commitment to the objective.”

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Noting that he has “some reservations” about the “fashion” that innovation centres have become, Nadkarni says: One cannot innovate in the absence of an ecosystem that drives innovation. This book, supported by deep research and many case studies, shows that it is possible to come up with an innovative business model that does not stick to conventional paradigms.”

Drawing an analogy with cricket, Nadkarni says that creating a good business model involves “searching for gaps, angling the bat and caressing the ball in the desired direction. It requires a creative yet trained mind. This book tells you exactly how to spot those gaps in the field and train your creative muscle.” (IANS)