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More spy drones to IAF for secret operations

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By NewsGram Staff-Writer

New Delhi: With armed forces around the world getting more advanced and equipped, defence ministry has decided to provide more spy drones to Indian Air Force (IAF) for executing secret or private operations. Sources at ministry on Monday said that the recent Rs 27-crore deal for acquiring 65 UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) for IAF’s Garud Commando Force is just an initial step in the direction of strengthening country’s defence wing.

Till now the armed forces have introduced more than 200 such drones. Most of which comes from Israel. One such drone named ‘killer’ is being used by IAF which detects and explodes like a cruise missile in to specific targets. Earlier also, the Indian Navy had requested construction of two midget submarines or “chariot” for its navy commandos. The Rs 2,017 crore deal has already got approval from defence authorities.

For now the government is indeed focusing more on sorting out basic structure for the proposed tri-service commandos in cyberspace, special operations and space troops, but they have not stopped the equipment and weaponry expansion in IAF. Although at a moderate speed in comparison to Army battalions, IAF’s Garuds are equally being geared up for secret operations.

The new spy drones with a range of 5 km, will be mainly used to monitor movement around important airbases and during counter terrorism operations. These mini-drones are very lightweight and possess 30 minute of operational endurance.

Garuds in IAF itself carry significant importance for the Indian armed forces. They were first spotted in action while tackling terrorists on different IAF airbases like Awantipora, Srinagar and Guwahati. They are highly trained for rescue operations and combating enemy. They are well-equipped to thrash enemy’s aircraft and radars while supporting friendly fighters.

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To Provide Internet Connectivity in Areas With Inadequate Infrastructure, Facebook Project Uses Drones

But the social networking giant still has its Internet.org initiative that has the stated aim of bringing Internet access and the benefits of connectivity to the portion of the world that doesn't have them.

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Facebook
In 2017, Facebook discontinued a small helicopter drone project that could temporarily replace cellular services in emergency situations, The Verge earlier reported. VOA

As part of its efforts to increase Internet connectivity in areas with inadequate infrastructure, Facebook recently explored ways to use tiny, almost pocket-sized, drones to boost mobile data speeds, according to a report from Business Insider.

The drones were designed to carry “high-density solid state drives… that could then be used to ferry data”.

So perhaps the drones would act as a mesh network of sorts between a grounded connection and a user’s smartphone to facilitate high-bandwidth data transfers, The Verge reported on Friday.

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Facebook began the Aquila project in 2014. In 2017, the solar-powered drone successfully completed the second full-scale test flight. Pixabay

The project, codenamed “Catalina”, was discontinued a year ago, adding to the list of aerial Internet projects that the social networking giant abandoned.

In 2017, Facebook discontinued a small helicopter drone project that could temporarily replace cellular services in emergency situations, The Verge earlier reported.

The project was discontinued a few months after being shown off at the F8 developer conference in May of 2017.

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A high altitude platform station (HAPS) system, Aquila’s mission, according to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, was to connect the world and help people who do not have online access all the opportunities of the Internet. Pixabay

The idea was to send a helicopter equipped with telecommunications equipment hundreds of metres up in the air to be able to tether to fibre and power lines in places where wireless capacity was compromised due to disaster or other factors.

In June 2018, Facebook announced it decided to abandon its plan to develop high-flying solar-powered drones called Aquila that was aimed to deliver Internet to nearly four billion people in remote parts of the world.

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The drones were designed to carry “high-density solid state drives… that could then be used to ferry data”. Pixabay

A high altitude platform station (HAPS) system, Aquila’s mission, according to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, was to connect the world and help people who do not have online access all the opportunities of the Internet.

Also Read: Study Identifies, Frequent Urinal Trips in Night An Indicator To High Blood Pressure

Facebook began the Aquila project in 2014. In 2017, the solar-powered drone successfully completed the second full-scale test flight.

But the social networking giant still has its Internet.org initiative that has the stated aim of bringing Internet access and the benefits of connectivity to the portion of the world that doesn’t have them. (IANS)