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More spy drones to IAF for secret operations

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credit: www.media.mensxp.com
credit: www.media.mensxp.com

By NewsGram Staff-Writer

New Delhi: With armed forces around the world getting more advanced and equipped, defence ministry has decided to provide more spy drones to Indian Air Force (IAF) for executing secret or private operations. Sources at ministry on Monday said that the recent Rs 27-crore deal for acquiring 65 UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) for IAF’s Garud Commando Force is just an initial step in the direction of strengthening country’s defence wing.

Till now the armed forces have introduced more than 200 such drones. Most of which comes from Israel. One such drone named ‘killer’ is being used by IAF which detects and explodes like a cruise missile in to specific targets. Earlier also, the Indian Navy had requested construction of two midget submarines or “chariot” for its navy commandos. The Rs 2,017 crore deal has already got approval from defence authorities.

For now the government is indeed focusing more on sorting out basic structure for the proposed tri-service commandos in cyberspace, special operations and space troops, but they have not stopped the equipment and weaponry expansion in IAF. Although at a moderate speed in comparison to Army battalions, IAF’s Garuds are equally being geared up for secret operations.

The new spy drones with a range of 5 km, will be mainly used to monitor movement around important airbases and during counter terrorism operations. These mini-drones are very lightweight and possess 30 minute of operational endurance.

Garuds in IAF itself carry significant importance for the Indian armed forces. They were first spotted in action while tackling terrorists on different IAF airbases like Awantipora, Srinagar and Guwahati. They are highly trained for rescue operations and combating enemy. They are well-equipped to thrash enemy’s aircraft and radars while supporting friendly fighters.

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‘Made In Senegal’ Drones Made With Broken Refrigerators, With Blacksmith’s Help

Mamadou Wade Diop has been working with drones both in the photography and health sectors for years, now, he decided to work with local blacksmiths and construct a drone made in Senegal

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Drone, Senegal, Africa, Innovation, Waste
Not all materials necessary to make the drone are available in Senegal, but Diop says he wants to prove that it’s possible to make this technology right here in his home country. VOA

Mamadou Wade Diop has been working with drones both in the photography and health sectors for years. But recently, he decided to work with local blacksmiths and construct a drone made entirely in Senegal.

Mamadou Wade Diop, who calls himself Dr. Drone on social media, is one of the few people, if not the only person in the Dakar area who can fix broken drones.

But recently, he’s taken his knowledge a step further, consulting with drone makers across the world on how to construct one of his own.

Diop says that through the internet, he’s been able to communicate with other drone makers in France and China to chat about their experiences.

Though he does a lot of work in the audio-visual sector, renting his services out to news and documentary crews as well as collecting drone footage of various places in Senegal to sell, the purpose of his first Made-In-Senegal drone will be in the health sector – a drone that can spread chemicals to prevent mosquito breeding in stagnant water.

Drone, Senegal, Africa, Innovation, Waste
Diop says that through the internet, he’s been able to communicate with other drone makers in France and China to chat about their experiences. Wikimedia Commons

Not all materials necessary to make the drone are available in Senegal, but Diop says he wants to prove that it’s possible to make this technology right here in his home country.

Diop says that carbon fiber isn’t available in Senegal. Though he ordered it from China, he worked with local blacksmiths to shape pieces for his drone. And as for local materials, he was able to recycle a piece of aluminum from a broken refrigerator to form part of the body of his drone.

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Mamadou Diallo is an owner of a photography shop who often collaborates with Diop.

Diallo says that the demand for drones in Senegal is not high but is increasing, though there is not yet enough of a market.

But he supports Diop, who says that if they don’t start making their own drones now, foreign companies will come in and begin to sell them at much higher prices. (VOA)