Sunday July 21, 2019

Movie Cameras. From Reel to IMAX, From IMAX to Smart phones.

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Photo Credit: www.clipartbest.com

 

By Atul Mishra

Muybridge sequence of a horse galloping
Muybridge sequence of a horse galloping

Cinematography has progressed profoundly and has seen diverse permutations and combinations in its echelon with the regular advancements in technology. Every year cinematographer gets stirred and sparked with the advent and inception of new sophisticated movie cameras. Let us trail the timeline to see how have movie cameras changed the face of silver screen and what is the motion movie milieu these days.

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Capturing moving images were done on revolving drums and disk way back in 1830s. Gelatin-emulsioned film strips came into being in second half of 1800s and combined with paper film, gave us the earliest surviving motion picture till date: Louis Le Prince’s Roundhay Garden Scene, filmed on October 14, 1888.

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Kinetoscope, in 1893, which was a large box that only one person at a time could see the film on through a peephole, was a major advancement in the 35mm celluloid film strips. All these films were monochromes, two-toned. The color cinematography began in early 1900s. In 1908, kinemacolor was introduced. In the same year, the short film A Visit to the Seaside became the first natural color movie to be publicly presented. In 1929, Fox introduced Fox Grandeur, the first 70 mm film format.

 

Still from A Visit to the Seaside
Still from A Visit to the Seaside

Since then cinematography, and not just its post-shooting-additions, but the shooting itself has seen multitude of changes. Who would have thought in 1910s, that a century later, The Dark Knight, would feature six sequences (a total of 28 minutes) shot on IMAX camera? And who would have thought six years after The Dark Knight, Tangerine would be shot on three i-phones and have its world premiere at Sundance Film Festival?

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These days with the advent of so many cameras, from DSLRs to smart phones, amazing short films are being made by aspiring film makers. May be only Nolan can afford an IMAX, but if a film shot on an i-phone can be screened at Sundance then surely enough anyone possessing a decent smart phone can nail the magic of silver screens. Do these short films being shot on normal DSLRs and smart phones these days lose the aesthetic qualities of a film? Well, to shake your shaft here is what The Hollywood Reporter described the look of Tangerine as- “crisp and vigorously cinematic”, with “an aesthetic purity that stands out in a field where so much indie filmmaking has gotten glossier and less technically adventurous.”

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Another giant shot on a DSLR is the 2013 indie film Ship of Theseus. This film that swooped two National Awards and various other accolades at many international film festivals, is visually enriched and starkly eye-catching, though being shot on a DSLR.

The Oscar contender for the next biggie Academy Olive has been completely shot on a smart phone and is considered the first feature film to do so.

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This is soon becoming a culture and cult. Good movies are being made and thanks to YouTube channels that these films reach out to many audience. And this is where the film makers stand today. Giants like Syncopy and 20th Century Fox may try their hands at IMAX, but the indie film enthusiasts these days are making their movies with their own IMAXs which not only justify the silver screen but garner various accolades across the globe.

Next Story

Dog Mounted Camera Allows Dogs to Live Stream from Higher Risk Areas

The streaming can also be recorded by the operator

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Brain child of M.Tech students Rajat Chiddarwal and Punit Jain, the technology allows a camera and a speaker to be mounted on a dog's back which could live stream feed from the site to the handler. Pixabay

Two IIT-Mumbai students have developed a technology — Dog Mounted Camera — that allows dogs to live stream from higher risk areas while their handlers monitor the situation from a safe distance.

Brain child of M.Tech students Rajat Chiddarwal and Punit Jain, the technology allows a camera and a speaker to be mounted on a dog’s back which could live stream feed from the site to the handler maintaining a kilometer distance. The streaming can also be recorded by the operator.

The project has reportedly cleared initial test runs and is expected to be completed by the year end. It aims to bring down the risk to human life during the routine surveillance drives in remote areas with high security risks.

The fully functional Dog Mounted Camera will have a set of articles which include a special jacket that can host the device set, including a transmitter and receiver, a camera and a speaker which will help the dog to get instructions from it’s instructor.

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Two IIT-Mumbai students have developed a technology — Dog Mounted Camera — that allows dogs to live stream from higher risk areas while their handlers monitor the situation from a safe distance. Pixabay

“The transmitter will help live streaming the video while the receiver will catch voice commands of the instructor which will later be given out through the speaker. The entire set up will help in guiding the dog and keep a watch on the surroundings of area,” Rajat, who has displayed his equipment at the International Police Expo being held in New Delhi, told IANS.

The project will be go through an induction process after which the armed forces will be able to use these equipments on their already trained dog squad.

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“Currently, the project is in proto-type stage but as of the various test runs and experiments, we are sure that the project will be completed by the year end and will then be ready to face induction phase to clear criteria of Indian Armed Forces,” said Rajat, M.Tech second year students of IIT Bombay. (IANS)