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‘Mukkabaaz’ actor Vineet Kumar Singh wants to help struggling boxers

Actor Vineet Kumar Singh, who is playing lead role Anurag Kashyap's forthcoming "Mukkabaaz", says he wants to help real life boxers who are struggling.

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Vineet Kumar Singh, the hero of the movie 'Mukkabaaz'. Wikimeadia Commons
Vineet Kumar Singh, the hero of the movie 'Mukkabaaz'. Wikimeadia Commons

Actor Vineet Kumar Singh, who is playing a struggling boxer in filmmaker Anurag Kashyap’s forthcoming movie “Mukkabaaz”, says he wants to help real life boxers who are struggling.

Asked if knowing the sport closely brought any changes in his mind, Vineet told IANS: “Of course, I would love to contribute something to them. In the ‘akhada’ (wrestling arena), where I used to practise, I saw so many boxers.”

Boxers still face challenges even after winning championship, Pixabay
Boxers still face challenges even after winning championship, Pixabay

“Some, who are struggling even though they are champions, and some are forced to retire, some are the victim of politics. I also made friends with them. So I want to help them with my limited capability so that awareness can be created.”

In the film, the actor fought with some of the real boxers and that made him think like a boxer.

“In the film, there was no action choreography and I fought against some of the boxing champions like Neeraj Goyat, Deepak Tanwar and Sandeep Yadav. So yes, I want our country to have more such champions, and as an actor and sports enthusiast, I want to support these kind of sports individuals who have always been ignored,” he said.

“Mukkabaaz” is set to release on January 12, 2018. IANS Live

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Study Says, Excess Physical Activity Can Be Harmful for Athletes

The researchers believe that fatigue and reduced cognitive control might also constitute the first stage in the development of a "burnout syndrome"

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Athletes
This excessive physical activity in Athletes leads to reduced activity of the lateral prefrontal cortex (a key region for cognitive control), similar to that observed during mental effort. Pixabay

Researchers have found that, in top Athletes, excess physical activity could be harmful and also associated with major fatigue and reduced performances.

The study published in the journal Current Biology shows that intensive physical training could harm brain capacity, particularly cognitive control.

For the findings, Mathias Pessiglione and his team from Inserm Research Institute in France said that they were interested in identifying the causes of a common phenomenon in top athletes, known as “overtraining syndrome”.

This was characterised by reduced athletic performance and intense fatigue.

Athletes suffering from this syndrome might be tempted by products likely to restore their performance.

The primary hypothesis of the researchers were clear: the fatigue caused by overtraining is similar to that caused by mental efforts.

To test this idea, the team spent nine weeks working with 37 triathletes, who were split into two groups.

The first underwent the “usual” high-level training whereas the second had additional training during the last three weeks of the experiment, with sessions lasting 40 per cent longer, on average.

From this, the researchers were able to identify similarities between overly intensive physical training and excessive mental work.

Athletes
Researchers have found that, in top Athletes, excess physical activity could be harmful and also associated with major fatigue and reduced performances. Pixabay

This excessive physical activity leads to reduced activity of the lateral prefrontal cortex (a key region for cognitive control), similar to that observed during mental effort.

This reduction in brain activity was associated with impulsive decision-making, in which short-term gratification was prioritised over long-term goals.

ALSO READ: Here’s Why Shaking Head To Remove Water From Ears Can Cause Brain Damage

In the case of top athletes, being this impulsive could lead to their decision to stop right in the middle of a performance or to abandon a race in order to end the pain felt during physical exertion.

The researchers believe that fatigue and reduced cognitive control might also constitute the first stage in the development of a “burnout syndrome”, which affects many people across various professional sectors. (IANS)