Thursday October 19, 2017

Multi-gene Test Found Effective in Predicting Alzheimer’s Dementia

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Alzheimer
Alzheimer Disease. IANS

San Francisco, Sep 24, 2017:  In a new test, a research team has found that combining the effects of over two dozen genetic variants help in predicting which cognitively normal older adults will go on to develop Alzheimer’s dementia.

The advantage of the test, known as Polygenic Hazard Score (PHS), is relative to testing only for the well-known genetic variant APOE E4, which has been considered the strongest genetic predictor of whether someone is likely to develop Alzheimer’s — a chronic neurodegenerative disease that usually starts slowly and worsens over time.

However, APOE E4 is only carried by 10 to 15 per cent of the population and recent research suggests that its effects have been overstated, Xinhua news agency reported on Sunday.

Publishing their findings this week in Annals of Neurology, the team, led by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and the University of California, San Diego, believes that the PHS test could provide risk estimates for the remaining 85 to 90 per cent of people who do not carry at least one copy of APOE E4.

Also Read: Yoga and these 5 Foods Prevent from Alzheimer’s & Will Boost your Memory 

“Beyond APOE E4 by itself, our polygenic hazard score can identify cognitively normal and mildly impaired older folks who are at greatest risk for developing Alzheimer’s associated clinical decline over time,” Chin Hong Tan from UCSF and the paper’s first author was quoted as saying.

Researchers found that PHS test could predict how long it would take for them to progress to Alzheimer’s dementia and how steep their cognitive decline would be.

The test enables the researchers to calculate an age-specific risk of developing Alzheimer’s based upon each person’s share of 31 genetic variants plus APOE E4. (IANS)

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Air pollution can Increase Risk of Dementia in Elder Women: Study

These women were also 92 per cent more likely to develop dementia, including Alzheimer's.

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New York, Feb 1, 2017: Elderly women exposed to tiny air pollution particles may face an increased risk of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, a study has found.

The findings showed the fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) — coming from power and automobile plants — could invade the brain and wreak havoc in older women who live in these places.

The air quality of those places which exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency’s standard of 81 percent were more likely to experience global cognitive decline.

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These women were also 92 per cent more likely to develop dementia, including Alzheimer’s.

“Microscopic particles generated by fossil fuels get into our body directly through the nose into the brain,” said Caleb Finch, Professor at the University of Southern California (USC).

“Cells in the brain treat these particles as invaders and react with inflammatory responses, which over the course of time, appear to exacerbate and promote Alzheimer’s disease,” Finch added.

The effects were stronger in women who had the APOE4 gene — a genetic variation that increases the risk for Alzheimer’s.

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For the general population, the risk was nearly 21 per cent, the researchers said.

The study also “provides the evidence of a critical Alzheimer’s risk gene possibly interacting with air particles to accelerate brain ageing,” said Jiu-Chiuan Chen, Associate Professor at the USC.

For the study, published in the Nature journal Translational Psychiatry, the team analysed data of 3,647 of 65- to 79-year-old women who did not have dementia.

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In another experiment, the scientists chronically exposed female mice carrying the APOE4 gene to nano-sized air pollution for 15 weeks.

The results showed that the exposure of mice to air particles damaged neurons in the hippocampus — the memory centre vulnerable to both brain ageing and Alzheimer’s disease.

-IANS

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Stress Buster: A simple massage that saves you from disadvantages of Urban Lifestyle

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Depression in women, Wikimedia
  • People living in urban areas have higher levels of psychotic illnesses such as Schizophrenia and Alzheimer
  • Many reports have proved that the greenery and lesser crowd of villages reduces stress
  • Stimulating a point between eyebrows by simply massaging it improves circulation, reduces muscle tension, and stimulates brain chemicals

More than half of the world’s population lives in urban areas. But researchers say that people living in urban areas have to cope with more stress and have higher levels of mood disorders and psychotic illnesses such as Schizophrenia and Alzheimer. The reason might be the busy and hectic lifestyle in cities.

People who live in the country are happier, according to the Daily Mail. Many reports have proved that the greenery and lesser crowd of villages reduces stress but with several cases of farmers committing suicide reported in newspapers  we can easily assume the stress they go through in case of failure in loan repayment or dowry system or many other possible reasons.

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Headache Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Headache Image (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

The reason of stress in city people may be the social aspects of urban living — the stress of living and dealing with lots of people, and feeling more anxiety, fear and threat as a result.  The other urban factors like pollution or noise makes the condition worse.  Although, the city dwellers would never face the same stress that people in rural areas do.

Here is an exercise which can be performed by only using your own two hands and it can evaporate all your tiredness, stress and anxiety in less than 5 minutes.

By simply massaging a point between your eyebrows on the forehead can help you release stress as soon as possible

What you need to do is – find the ledge between your eyebrows on the forehead.

Then, massage this point for 45 seconds.

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Stimulating this point by simply pressing and massaging it improves circulation, reduces muscle tension, and stimulates brain chemicals known as endorphins.  Apart from just relieving stress, calming your mind, reducing headaches, chronic fatigue, insomnia, and eye pressure, this massage is very effective at alleviating pain in the sinuses and clearing nasal congestion. This massage will help you relieve headaches, stress, and other causes of interrupted sleep.

-The article is compiled by a staff-writer at NewsGram.

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3 responses to “Stress Buster: A simple massage that saves you from disadvantages of Urban Lifestyle”

  1. It’s better to try out this exercise rather than taking any allopathic medicines as latter can cause side effects.

  2. Stress busters should be a good way. People living in urban ares should often visit places which are calmer, greener, less crowdy and should often meditate. This rejuvenates the body and the brain

  3. I read somewhere that people belonging to the age group of 18-33 are the most stressed. i guess if we make this simple exercise a part of our lifestyle, we will be more relaxed and will benefit from the other positive aspects of the exercise as well, like decreasing insomnia and headaches!

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Biosensor to display the progress of Alzheimer’s disease

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image source: convergence.ucsb.edu

New York: A team of researchers led by an Indian-American scientist has developed a portable biosensor that can display the progress of Alzheimer’s disease in a patient.

A test on the cheap and simple biosensor can measure the level of a protein called beta-amyloid, increased level of which leads to the degeneration of brain cells and causes Alzheimer’s, in the blood at tiny concentrations in just half an hour.

“We want to develop a point of care system, where a small drop of blood plasma can reveal their beta-amyloid level immediately so that a doctor can tailor a patient’s therapy immediately,” said lead author Ajeet Kaushik from the University of Florida in the US.

The protein, which is found in lower levels in the blood, makes it a useful biomarker to diagnose and monitor the disease progression.

A quick test on the biosensor can reveal a clinician to collect accurate information on the progression of the disease and see what is happening to a patient over time.

It will also show if and when the disease reaches an untreatable level, the authors reported in the study published in the journal Biosensors and Bioelectronics.

The researchers pointed out that the affordable test can be useful in both developed countries and rural settings. Also with the right data, doctors can respond quickly to changes in a patient’s brain by reducing or increasing their dose of drugs. (IANS)