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Mumbai-born British ‘Curry King’ Noon dead

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Mumbai: Mumbai-born British businessman Lord Ghulam Kaderbhoy Noon, who earned the moniker ‘Curry King‘ for popularising Indian chicken tikka and curry in Britain and survived the 26/11 terror attacks in Taj Mahal and Palace Hotel in Mumbai, has died in London.

Born in Mumbai on January 24, 1936, the 79-year-old Noon breathed his last — in a country he adopted in 1964 — on Tuesday after a prolonged battle with cancer.

While on a visit to India and his birthplace in Mumbai, Noon was among the thousands of guests trapped inside the iconic Taj Mahal and Palace Hotel during the November 26-29, 2008, Mumbai terror attacks, and was later rescued by security forces who stormed and neutralised the Pakistani terrorists.

Shiv Sena’s youth leader Aaditya Thackeray expressed grief over the demise of Lord Noon, a prominent member of the Dawoodi Bohra community who started with a sweetmeat shop in Mumbai nearly six decades ago.

“One of the most prominent Indians in Britain, and beyond that all, a very close friend of our family… Noon uncle was the epitome of the ‘never give up’ spirit of entrepreneurship and humanity,” said Aaditya Thackeray.

Migrating to Britain in his teens, Noon founded and ran a number of food product companies in Southall, specialising in Indian cuisine.

His main business ‘Noon Products’ was established in 1987, manufacturing chilled and frozen ready-to-eat Indian and Thai meals, mostly for British supermarkets.

In 1994, the factory was reduced to ashes in a blaze, but he got it working within 10 weeks and in 2005 it was acquired by Irish food giant Kerry Group.

In 1996, he was made Member of Order of British Empire (MBE), Knight Bachelor in 2002, as Baron Noon in 2011, and finally entered the British House of Lords in January 2011 as a Labour Party leader.

Later, Noon became the chancellor of University of East London, a Fellow of Birkbeck and a trustee of Maimonides Foundation, which promotes dialogue between the Jews and Muslims.

(IANS)

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Northeast is Fast Emerging as the new Start-up Destination, Says Minister Jitendra Singh

Due to improvement in connectivity and transport facility in the last two years, coupled with concentrated administrative focus, more and more youngsters are now heading towards the northeastern states to venture into entrepreneurship

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Union Minister of State for Development of the North Eastern Region Jitendra Singh. Wikimedia

New Delhi, October 16, 2017 : Union Minister of State for Development of the North Eastern Region (DoNER) Jitendra Singh claimed that the area was fast emerging as the new start-up destination for youngsters from all over India, an official statement on Monday.

Due to improvement in connectivity and transport facility in the last two years, coupled with concentrated administrative focus, more and more youngsters are now heading towards the northeastern states to venture into entrepreneurship and take advantage of its unexplored potential, he said, according to a DoNER Ministry statement.

Citing an example, he said in certain areas of Northeast, including states like Arunachal Pradesh, “while almost 40 per cent of the fruit goes waste on account of lack of adequate storage and transport facilities, the same can be used to produce and manufacture fresh and pure fruit juice at a much more cost-effective price”.

ALSO READ Over 4,000 km of roads, highways to be constructed in northeast

During an interaction with youngsters, Jitendra Singh also pointed out that many new airports coming up at Pakyong (Sikkim), Itanagar and Shillong, which along with a time-bound plan to lay broad-gauge rail track, would bring in further ease of doing business.

“Another sector of entrepreneurship which is fast emerging in Northeast is the medical and healthcare sector.

“For years, there has been a trend for patients to shift outside the region, mostly to Kolkata or Vellore, but the encouragement given to the private corporate sector has now resulted in the opening of new hospitals within the region itself and young entrepreneurs are taking the lead,” he said. (IANS)

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Why is the Scene of Entrepreneurs in India Distant?

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Entrepreneurs in India
Business Startup. Pixabay

New Delhi, July 28, 2017: What is entrepreneurship? It is the capacity and willingness to develop, organize and manage a business enterprise along with risk factors in order to make a profit. This implies that there is no business without risk.

There are many obstacles that trouble a growing entrepreneur in India. This doesn’t mean that there aren’t any entrepreneurs in India, but rather the number of entrepreneurs springing up is not an encouraging figure.

Here are some of the reasons for fewer entrepreneurs in India:

 Brittle family system

This issue bothers entrepreneurs in India because of the stronger family ties that we Indians have. Family support is always absent in such cases. Parents always prefer their children to take up a conventional 9-5 job rather than take up a risky business venture where there is no guarantee that the venture will work out and a high level of risk is involved.

Government ordinances

A few business ventures that break free from the restraints of the usual problems get caught in the outmoded policies of our government. The framework of our administrative system limits the organic development of the enterprises.

Low Internet usage in India

The majority of the innovations in the world occur at internet space. The internet usage percentage stands low at 5% in India. Such a small number makes it really difficult to bring in money and few entrepreneurial ventures.

Also Read: Most Indian firms see Employee experience as a critical aspect of achieving their Business Objectives

Indian education system

The main reason for low innovation in entrepreneurship is our educational system. Our education system hardly focusses on innovation right from its inception. Without an innovative idea, no entrepreneurial venture can sustain itself beyond the initial stages.

Bottom Line

India being a developing nation hasn’t made much progress in the direction of innovation. What we really need to do is mold young minds and inspire them to think creatively. They should be encouraged to let go of their impediments and take the risk to tread a path that’s not yet been explored.

– by Naina Mishra of Newsgram. Twitter @Nainamishr94


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt. 

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British Indian and Renowned Sarod Maestro Soumik Datta to Curate Festival in London

Soumik Datta, a British Indian and a renowned Sarod Maestro, has been chosen to curate the Asian Festival at London's Horseman Museum

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Soumik Datta to curate festival
Soumik Datta, a British Indian and a renowned musician. Twitter

London, July 4, 2017: British Indian Soumik Datta, a renowned sarod maestro, will curate a day-long festival, Indian Summer Baaja, as part of the Horniman Museum and Gardens’ Indian Summer season, on July 23.

The event will feature music, stories, and dance from across South Asia as curator Soumik brings together an array of Britain-based musicians, storytellers and dancers whose contemporary practice is deep-rooted in the musical traditions of South Asia.

Horniman Museum and Garden’s Indian Summer will be a series of events and exhibitions from July 9 to September 3 and celebrate 70 years of India’s and Britain’s cultural ties.

ALSO READ: British Indian Lawyer Sarosh Zaiwalla Invited to Russia in St Petersburg International Economic Forum 2017 (SPIEF) attended by PM Narendra Modi

Indian Summer Baaja will feature world music artist Shammi Pithia, percussionist Bernhard Schimpelsberger, tabla player Gurdain Singh Rayatt, violinist Preetha Narayanan and progressive six piece British-Bengali band Khiyo, among others.

The day will close with a two-hour gala of voices, drummers, and strings led by Soumik, who has worked on collaborative projects with the likes of Beyonce Knowles, Anoushka Shankar, Joss Stone and Shankar Mahadevan, on the sarod.

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“I wanted to recreate the atmosphere of vibrant Indian festivals complete with nomad bands and folk musicians playing on street corners and city gardens,” Soumik said in a statement.

“The word ‘baaja’ in Hindi roughly translates as ‘instrument’ or group of instruments. For me, an instrument carries with it the DNA of where it has come from. In its sound, it carries the identity of its region.

“In its resonance lives its many stories. Responding to the incredible collection of instruments at the Horniman, I wanted to celebrate ancient South Asian instruments such as the sarod, veena, bansuri and kanjira that are now being played by young and dynamic second generation maestros in the UK with an urgency that keeps this music relevant and alive,” he added. (IANS)