Sunday February 24, 2019

Mumbai roads make way for speedy heart transplant

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

For the second time in five days, the chaos and clutter on a stretch of Mumbai roads made way on Friday for a donated heart to be speeded across the metropolis from a donor to a recipient – covering 19 km in just 14 minutes, officials said.

The heart was harvested from a 63-year old man at MGM Hospital in Vashi in Navi Mumbai, and was taken to Fortis Hospital in Mulund in north-east Mumbai, to be transplanted to a 29-year-old recipient.

Chipping in for the noble cause, Mumbai and Navi Mumbai traffic police authorities collaborated to create a ‘green corridor’ and enable the donated organ to reach its destination in the shortest possible time.

It was no doubt a tall order, considering the morning peak hour and congestion on the Vashi-Mumbai routes, but the effort paid off in the end.

A heart transplant must take place within four hours of the harvest, and sooner the better, medicos said.

Mumbai Police swung into action along with Navi Mumbai counterparts after the request for making suitable arrangements at around 3.45 a.m. on Friday.

“They readied a route plan within 20 minutes, including diversions and clearing congested roads, stalling traffic signals and synchronising all other aspects,” an official said.

“It is extremely heartening to see the city’s second heart transplant in less than a week – while the organ donation month awareness is underway,” said Fortis Healthcare Regional Director Sukhmeet Sandhu.

The hospital’s chief cardiac surgeon Dr Anvay Mulay said the recipient will be under observation for the next one-two days.

This was the second heart transplant in the city after a gap of 47 long years.

The first one after this many years was carried out last Monday in a similar well-coordinated operation when the harvested heart was taken from Jehangir Hospital, Pune, by road to the airport in the city, then to Mumbai airport and then again a road journey to Mulund’s Fortis Hospital – all in less than 90 minutes.

The country’s first heart transplant operation was carried out at Mumbai’s KEM Hospital by Dr. P.K. Sen in 1968.

Next Story

The Craft of Distilling Is Ancient, Different Story Behind Every Bottle

The craft of distilling is very ancient and recipes have been handed down generations. To me, food and spirits are very culture-centric and each dish or drink is an experience of this culture and have a lot of story to it.

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The aim is for the curated audience to meet curated brands and learn about their stories. We consciously wanted to create a small, well-curated festival that encourages such conversations amongst the visitors," Prakash elaborated. Pixabay

Every bottle of alcohol has a tale to tell and to celebrate this, over 20 international masters, distillers, mixologists and story tellers will gather in Mumbai over the weekend on a platform that celebrates the craft of distillers and distilleries. It will also be a rite of passage for the new consumer who is open to experiencing luxury beverages that are a product of passion and commitment and are produced in small batches, without any compromise on quality.

“Every bottle has a tale, waiting to be shared – of its founder, of the distiller, of the wood in which it lay, of the people who built the spirit, of the mixologist who decided to `play’ with it and more. Listen, learn and celebrate the people behind the spirits,” Keshav Prakash, who began his career as an advertising filmmaker and then travelled the world to discover the world of fine spirts, told IANS of The Vault Biennale at the Mahalakshmi Race Course.

“The craft of distilling is very ancient and recipes have been handed down generations. To me, food and spirits are very culture-centric and each dish or drink is an experience of this culture and have a lot of story to it.

“For example, making whiskey is a tradition native to Scotland, much like rum to the Caribbean, Mezcal to the Mexico and so on. These are parts of their values and teachings handed over from generation to generation, with much love and celebration, making it an intrinsic part of a living culture,” Prakash explained.

bottle
will also be a rite of passage for the new consumer who is open to experiencing luxury beverages that are a product of passion and commitment and are produced in small batches, without any compromise on quality. Pixabay

The event is open to only 400 aficionados each day.

“We envision two kinds of visitors at the Biennale – one who are newly immersing themselves in fine spirits and others who know their single malt, gin, whiskey etc. The aim is for the curated audience to meet curated brands and learn about their stories. We consciously wanted to create a small, well-curated festival that encourages such conversations amongst the visitors,” Prakash elaborated.

Also Read: The Unconventional Way of Learning: Textbooks Come Alive in Gujarat’s Schools
What will be on offer?

Over 50 handpicked fine beverage brands like Kilchoman Machir Bay, Rémy Martin, Cotswolds Gin, and Amrut Peated Port Pipe. Leading the audience will be mixologists from World’s 50 Best Bars, among them Hiroyasu Kayama of Tokyo, Alex Simonidis & Georgia Georgakopoulou of Athens and Jose Luis Leon of Mexico City. (IANS)