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“Music is a bridge of life”: Singer Mukhtiyar Ali

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By Ankit Sinha

UDAIPUR: Singer Mukhtiyar Ali staged a mesmerizing performance with Duplessy, at the just concluded World Music Festival, which featured bands and artistes from across the globe. He says language doesn’t matter when it comes to appreciating music.

“Music is a bridge of life. It connects humans with life. Otherwise, human beings are not really connected to life. After listening to music, a human being first joins with himself. When he joins with himself, he joins with society. This is the job of music and art. People also understand this,” Ali said here.

“I feel proud that the new generation is also appreciating our music. The feeling of music is important, Language doesn’t matter,” he added.

Ali and Duplessy, who composed music for the film “Finding Fanny”, have enthralled concert goers across the world with their performances. Yet, Ali says that his beginnings have been incredibly humble and full of challenges.

“Our community (Mirasi) is almost at the (India-Pakistan) border. Our tradition has been to sing with livestock keepers. Both Hindus and Muslims used to participate in our concerts. Our people also used to choose songs which would cater to both Hindus and Muslims and even Sikhs. That was done by our ancestors and then, the Sufi trend went on from there. It has been 700 years since our ancestors pioneered the trend,” Ali explained.

He reminisced the time when the impact of his community’s music weakened and how he took on the challenge to revive it.

“When India won independence and when it was almost 40 years since that time, new mass media like TV and radio came and our people weren’t really educated according to that. Then their music got weak. After the 80s, people almost stopped singing.

“After education, the Muslims said that their people should not listen to music in Islam and Hindus said that Muslims should not sing in temples, so it was difficult for both of them,” he said.

But Ali insisted his father teach him music.

“Our ancestors said that we can’t continue singing. But then, out of 100 families, I took the challenge and told my father, ‘I want to learn music, please teach me’. But he warned me that I could starve due to this.

“However, I remained adamant. When my father was alive, I traveled at least three to four countries on the basis of my music. For me, it was an honor and my father was happy that I took the music out of India,” Ali said.

Now, Ali takes pride saying that more youngsters from the Mirasi community are learning music.

He calls upon the media and especially social media to promote their music.

“Media plays a big role in promoting music. Social media has reached out to everyone. Our music, our folk, whether it is from Rajasthan or any other place, should be heard more. I also request to media to promote this music more,” Ali said.

As to how he met Duplessy, Ali said: “I met Mathias in 9-10 years. It was the will of god. We met in Mumbai, and we felt that we know each other very well.”

NewsGram view- Music binds people irrespective of all boundaries like nation, religion, caste etc. Recently Adnan Sami was awarded Indian citizenship which showcases that through music peace can be achieved.

(IANS) (pic courtesy: riadzany.blogspot.com)

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Krishna Rao Pandit Festival Brings Together Leading Muscians

Patil, on the other hand, is known for her Khayal form of Hindustani music. Hailing from the Gwalior gharana, she has performed across major classical music festivals including Sawai Gandharva Bhimsen Festival and Tansen festival.

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Manjusha Patil. Flickr
Manjusha Patil. Flickr

In an attempt to celebrate quality and excellence across art forms, Taj Mahal Tea has partnered with Khayal Trust to host the esteemed Krishna Rao Festival this year. The festival will echo performances by renowned classical singers including Neela Bhagwat, Manjusha Patil and Kedia Brothers.

Scheduled to be held at the Veer Savarkar Auditorium here on August 16-17, day one of the festival will be dedicated to Tabla maestro Ustad Nizamuddin Khan and day two will pay a tribute to prominent musician, Krishnarao Pandit, said a statement.

“It is an honor to share the stage with some of India’s biggest classical singers at the 18th edition of the prestigious Krishna Rao Festival. The festival is an attempt to celebrate the spirit of Indian classical music and I feel proud to be a part of this celebration.

Krishna Rao Pandit. Flickr
Krishna Rao Pandit. Flickr

“I would like to thank Taj Mahal Tea and Khayal Trust for this opportunity and hope they continue to support artists by collaborating with various music platforms across the country,” said Patil.

Also Read: Apple Music on Lead Over Its Rival Spotify in All Market: Report

Talking about the artists, Bhagwat is a senior exponent of the Gwalior gharana and a renowned classical vocalist. Known for composing and performing thumris from a feminist perspective, her contributions include compositions of Kabir and Meera bhajans.

Patil, on the other hand, is known for her Khayal form of Hindustani music. Hailing from the Gwalior gharana, she has performed across major classical music festivals including Sawai Gandharva Bhimsen Festival and Tansen festival. (IANS)