Tuesday June 18, 2019

Music lessons boost children’s memory and grades

Joining a music class may help children improve academic performance as researchers have found that such lessons can enhance their cognitive abilities

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hearing loss
Representational image.

Joining a music class may help children improve academic performance as researchers have found that such lessons can enhance their cognitive abilities — including language-based reasoning and short-term memory.

“Despite indications that music has beneficial effects on cognition, music is disappearing from general education curricula,” said study co-author Artur Jaschke from VU University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands.

Music lessons can help children greatly.

“This inspired us to initiate a long-term study on the possible effects of music education on cognitive skills that may underlie academic achievement,” Jaschke added.

For the study, published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience, the researchers conducted the study with 147 children across multiple Dutch schools, using a structured musical method developed by the Ministry of Research and Education in the Netherlands together with an expert centre for arts education.

All schools followed the regular primary school curriculum, with some providing supplementary music or visual arts classes. In these, the children were given both theoretical and practical lessons. After 2.5 years, the children’s academic performance was assessed, as well as various cognitive skills including planning, inhibition and memory skills.

The researchers found that children who received music lessons had significant cognitive improvements compared to all other children in the study. Visual arts classes also showed a benefit. Children in these classes had significantly improved visual and spatial short-term memory compared to students who had not received any supplementary lessons.

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Students learning music have better cognitivon skills. VOA

“Children who received music lessons showed improved language-based reasoning and the ability to plan, organise and complete tasks, as well as improved academic achievement,” Jaschke said.

“This suggests that the cognitive skills developed during music lessons can influence children’s cognitive abilities in completely unrelated subjects, leading to overall improved academic performance,” Jaschke added. IANS

Next Story

High Consumption of Junk Food May Spike up Allergies in Children

The study revealed a significant correlation between AGEs and junk food consumption, said Roberto Berni Canani, Associate Professor at the University of Naples Federico II in Italy

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Junk Food. Wikimedia Commons

Researchers have found that high consumption of junk food such as microwaved foods and barbequed meats may be responsible for food allergies in children.

The study, presented at the 52nd Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition, shows that high levels of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are associated with food allergies in kids.

AGEs are present in high levels in junk foods such as sugars, processed foods, microwaved foods and roasted or barbequed meats. They are known to play a role in the development and progression of different oxidative-based diseases including diabetes, atherosclerosis and neurological disorders, said the researchers.

Cholesterol -- a molecule normally linked with cardiovascular diseases -- may also play an important role in the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease, researchers have found.
Junk Food is highly rich in Cholesterol. Pixabay

For the study, the research team observed 61 children aged between 6 and 12 years. They were identified in three categories – those with food allergies, those with respiratory allergies and healthy controls.

Also Read- Research Finds Nurses at an Increased Risk of Sleep Deprivation

The study revealed a significant correlation between AGEs and junk food consumption, said Roberto Berni Canani, Associate Professor at the University of Naples Federico II in Italy. (IANS)