Wednesday February 20, 2019

Music lessons boost children’s memory and grades

Joining a music class may help children improve academic performance as researchers have found that such lessons can enhance their cognitive abilities

0
//
hearing loss
Music lessons may improve development of children's cognitive skills.

Joining a music class may help children improve academic performance as researchers have found that such lessons can enhance their cognitive abilities — including language-based reasoning and short-term memory.

“Despite indications that music has beneficial effects on cognition, music is disappearing from general education curricula,” said study co-author Artur Jaschke from VU University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands.

Music lessons can help children greatly.

“This inspired us to initiate a long-term study on the possible effects of music education on cognitive skills that may underlie academic achievement,” Jaschke added.

For the study, published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience, the researchers conducted the study with 147 children across multiple Dutch schools, using a structured musical method developed by the Ministry of Research and Education in the Netherlands together with an expert centre for arts education.

All schools followed the regular primary school curriculum, with some providing supplementary music or visual arts classes. In these, the children were given both theoretical and practical lessons. After 2.5 years, the children’s academic performance was assessed, as well as various cognitive skills including planning, inhibition and memory skills.

The researchers found that children who received music lessons had significant cognitive improvements compared to all other children in the study. Visual arts classes also showed a benefit. Children in these classes had significantly improved visual and spatial short-term memory compared to students who had not received any supplementary lessons.

SCREEN TIME
Students learning music have better cognitivon skills. VOA

“Children who received music lessons showed improved language-based reasoning and the ability to plan, organise and complete tasks, as well as improved academic achievement,” Jaschke said.

“This suggests that the cognitive skills developed during music lessons can influence children’s cognitive abilities in completely unrelated subjects, leading to overall improved academic performance,” Jaschke added. IANS

Next Story

Study Reveals Midday Meals in School Improves Child’s Scores and Skills

The effect of nutrition appears to be cumulative, seen over time.

0
Food
Food provided to children during Midday Meal. Pixabay

Primary school children who ate midday meals over an extended period were shown to have significantly better learning outcomes, according to researchers of Indian-origin.

The researchers, in the study published in the Journal of Development Economics, suggest a powerful connection between nutrition and education.

Professors Rajshri Jayaraman from ESMT Berlin in Germany and Tanika Chakraborty from the Indian Institute of Technology in India studied the effects of India’s midday meal scheme – the world’s largest free school lunch programme – feeding over 120 million children every day.

midday meal
Children showed an improvement of nine per cent for maths test scores. Pixabay

The study showed that children with up to five years of midday meals had reading test scores that are 18 per cent higher than those of students with less than a year of school lunches.

In addition, they showed an improvement of nine per cent for maths test scores.

“The effect of nutrition appears to be cumulative, seen over time. Previous studies have varied between two weeks and two years, and failed to capture the important impact. Our research shows that the real benefit of school lunches was seen in children exposed for two to five years,” said Jayaraman.

Also Read: Instagram Internally Testing Web Version of Direct Messages

For the study, the researchers used data from nearly 600 rural districts in India, covering over 200,000 households.

In 2017, World Food Programme implemented or supported school feeding programmes for 18.3 million children in 71 countries.(IANS)