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Muslim woman Shamim Jahan from Uttarakhand threatens to adopt Hinduism if denied Justice

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Uttarakhand, May 23, 2017: A Muslim woman Shamim Jahan, a native of Udham Singh Nagar, Uttarakhand was given triple talaq by her husband Asif inside Gadarpur police station has threatened either to convert to Hinduism or commit suicide if she did not get justice. It has been recorded in a video that has gone viral on Wednesday.

In a video, she states, “after my experience, I think it is better to convert to Hinduism as these things do not happen in Hinduism. The other option is suicide. Through media, I want this video to get the attention of Modiji and Yogiji and I hope they give justice to me. I have suffered a lot,” mentioned indiatoday.in report.

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It is not the first time that she has been given the divorce. Earlier, Asif divorced her right after four years of marriage. They two were then reunited after completing the Halala period of 40 days through some counseling from family elders.

Now, Jahan married since 12 years. The matter reached Gadarpur Police Station. To everyone’s surprise, Asif entered and uttered ‘talaq talaq talaq’ to her at the police station itself as the police persons looked on.

Helpless Jahan then, made a video in a bid to seek help from media and authorities after her husband gave her triple talaq.

– prepared by Himanshi Goyal of Newsgram, Twitter: @himanshi1104

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Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

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Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

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Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

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Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

Also Read: Beware! Sipping Hot Tea Raises Risk of Esophageal Cancer

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)