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“My contribution will be visible once I leave this world” : Veteran Actor Om Puri dies of Heart Attack at 66

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Om Puri, Twitter

– by Arundhuti Banerjee

Mumbai, Jan 6, 2017:  Did Om Puri have a premonition about his death when he spoke about it to IANS just a fortnight ago? In retrospect, it would seem so, because he talked about “leaving the world” and that his legacy would be “visible” once he departed.

 His comments on leaving the world have become a reality too soon.

In one of his last interviews, which took place at a hotel here on December 23, 2016, Om Puri told IANS: “My contribution as an actor will be visible once I leave this world and the young generation, especially film students will watch my films.”

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The 66 year-old actor died of a heart attack at his residence here early morning on Friday.

Today, as he leaves a void in the world of cinema with his untimely demise, the film fraternity is looking back at his vast contribution to showbiz. Theatre, television, Indian and British films, Hollywood and Pakistani cinema — he did it all and left a lasting impression. His legacy, celebrities said, will live on.

A lover of alternate cinema with socially relevant themes at its core, Om Puri said: “For me, the real hard-hitting cinema was between 1980s and 1990s where Shyam Benegal, Govind Nihalani, Basu Chatterjee, Mrinal Sen and Gulzar made some remarkable films.”

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He worked in multiple projects with Nihalani and Benegal — films like “Aakrosh”, “Ardh Satya” and “Tamas” which catapulted him into the realm of great actors. Both the directors were overcome by emotions when IANS contacted them after news of Om Puri’s death broke. In shaky voices, both said it was too early to talk.

Just days earlier, he was happily interacting with young scribes to promote his upcoming political satire “Rambhajan Zindabad”. Casually dressed in a pair of baggy jeans and a black shirt, he was, as was his style, devoid of any airs about his stardom — a position not defined by fanatical, frenzied fans, but by the sheer following of his nuanced performances and undying passion for art.

He was — as the biography by his former wife Nandita Puri — rightly says, an “Unlikely Hero”.

The veteran actor, a recipient of Padma Shri, started his journey as an actor with a Marathi film “Ghashiram Kotwal” in 1972. If he featured in some intense dramas, he also balanced out his filmography with movies like “Mirch Masala”, “Jaane Bhi Do Yaaro”, “Chachi 420”, “Hera Pheri”, “Malamaal Weekly” and more.

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“There are two kinds of cinema — one is just for entertainment, the other touches your heart. Both have their own purpose,” Om Puri had told IANS.

When he was chairman of the National Film Development Corporation, Om Puri was focussed on encouraging meaningful films. The National School of Drama alumnus was also president of Cine and TV Artistes Association.

More recently, he featured in Bollywood films like “Ghayal Once Again” and “Mirzya”, as well as in Pakistani film “Actor In Law”. He even used his distinct baritone for the voice of black panther Bagheera in the Hindi dubbed version of Hollywood film “The Jungle Book”.

Age did not slow him down. He was busy dabbling in multiple projects like “Viceroy’s House”, “Tubelight” and “Manto”.

The two-time National Film Award winner was bestowed the Padma Shri, India’s fourth highest civilian award, in 1990.

His international career took off as early as 1982 when he featured in a small role in Oscar-winning film “Gandhi”. It also set the stage for him to explore more on foreign shores — his British films were “My Son the Fanatic”, “East Is East” and “The Parole Officer”, and his Hollywood movies included “City of Joy”, “Wolf”, “The Ghost and the Darkness” and “The Hundred-Foot Journey”.

In 2004, he was made an honorary officer of the Order of the British Empire for services to the British film industry.

While he had a glorious journey in the film world, his personal life went through turbulence. In 2013, his wife had filed a case against him, alleging domestic violence. They separated, leaving him with only visitation rights to their son, Ishaan.

He was frank and blunt about his views — and just last year, he faced the brunt of it when a police complaint was filed against him for his comments that were found to be insulting to Indian soldiers. In 2015, he spoke on the issue of cow slaughter in India. In 2012, he had landed in a bit of a soup after he called Naxals “fighters not terrorists”.

But Om Puri remained fearless till the end — in his works and his words. (IANS)

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This Healthy Diet Can Help Reduce Blood Pressure

High blood pressure means the heart has to put in more effort to pump blood save yourself from it with these simple tips from an expert

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Bloodpressure
Bloodpressure is a slow killer and can be kept in control with some simple steps. Pixabay

High blood pressure means the heart has to put in more effort to pump blood. This force can cause damage to blood vessels which can lead to heart attack, brain stroke, kidney damage or nerve damage.

Daljit Kaur, Chief Clinical Nutritionist, Fortis Escorts, Okhla Road, Delhi, suggests a healthy diet to reduce the blood pressure:

Maintain ideal body weight, avoid too much sugary foods

Exercise 30 minutes brisk walking every day is recommended to reduce the blood pressure

Reduce sodium chloride intake up to 2 to 5 grams per day.

Read the food labels. Salt preserved foods like meat, ham, sausages, and smoked fish should be avoided.

Food containing more salt like chips, papadh, salted nuts, and saltedpopcorns should be avoided.

Food preserved with sodium like ketchup, sauce, pickle, chutney, processed food like cheese and salted butter food enhancers MSG should not be included in the diet.

Blood-Pressure
High BP can cause damage to blood vessels which can lead to heart attack, brain stroke, kidney damage, or nerve damage. Pixabay

To make the food more palatable a variety of condiments herbs and spices, lemon, vinegar, tamarind, onion, garlic, ginger can be used.

Choose whole grains, whole pulses and lean proteins such a fish and poultry.

Cooking method should be baking, broiling, roasting, steaming to avoid frying.

Avoid saturated fats, Trans fats, and cholesterol rich foods. Include omega 3 fatty acids like walnut, flax seeds.

Use skimmed milk and products.

Take plenty of fruits and vegetables.

Also Read: A Blend of Spices May Help in Lowering Inflammation in the Body: Researchers

Limit alcohol intake. (IANS)

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Find out How Mental Stress Can Trigger Heart Attack

Mental stress and not physicals stress may trigger a second heart attack

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Mental stress heart
Mental stress may be a stronger predictor of a repeat heart attack or even dying from heart disease. Pixabay

For those who have survived a heart attack, mental stress — and not physical stress — may be a stronger predictor of a repeat heart attack or even dying from heart disease, warn researchers.

The team at Emory University investigated whether myocardial ischemia — when blood flow to the heart is reduced such that the heart muscle doesn’t get enough oxygen — induced by mental stress was associated with poor outcomes among heart attack survivors, and how this type of stress testing compares with conventional stress brought on by exercise.

Among more than 300 young and middle-aged individuals enrolled in the study, those who endured myocardial ischemia with mental stress had a two-fold higher likelihood of having another heart attack or dying from heart disease compared with those who did not have cardiac ischemia induced by mental stress.

“In our study, myocardial ischemia provoked by mental stress was a better risk indicator than what we were able to see with conventional stress testing,” said Viola Vaccarino from Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health in Atlanta and the study’s principal investigator.

Mental stress heart
Mental stress provoked by emotions has a distinct mechanism of risk for heart disease and its complications compared with physical stress. Pixabay

This is the only study of its kind in this relatively young adult population of heart attack survivors.

“These data point to the important effect that psychological stress can have on the heart and on the prognosis of patients with heart disease,” she added.

The investigators studied 306 adults aged 61 years or younger (50 years on average and ranging from 22-61 years), who had been in the hospital for a heart attack in the previous eight months.

Traditional stress tests, in which someone exercises on a treadmill or takes a medicine that makes the heart beat faster and harder as if the person was actually exercising, have long been used to check blood flow to the heart and gauge the risk of heart problems.

Taking into account patients’ psychological stress may help clinicians better evaluate the risk of recurrent heart attacks or death seen in some patients surviving a heart attack.

Overall, mental stress induced myocardial ischemia occurred in 16 per cent of patients and conventional ischemia in 35 per cent, suggesting that traditional ischemia due to exercise or drug-induced stress is more common.

Over a three-year follow-up, 10 per cent of patients (28 individuals) had another heart attack and two died of heart-related problems.

The incidence of heart attack or cardiovascular-related death was more than doubled in patients with mental stress induced ischemia compared with those without mental stress ischemia, occurring in 10 (20 per cent) and 20 (8 per cent) patients, respectively.

Mental stress heart
Among more than 300 young and middle-aged individuals enrolled in the study, those who endured myocardial ischemia with mental stress had a two-fold higher likelihood of having another heart attack or dying from heart disease. Pixabay

“Patients who developed ischemia with mental stress had more than two times the risk of having a repeat heart attack or dying from heart disease compared with those who did not develop ischemia during mental stress,” Vaccarino elaborated.

What this means is that the propensity to have a reduction in blood flow to the heart during acute psychological stress poses substantial future risk to these patients,

Such reduction in blood flow, when it occurs in real life, could trigger a heart attack or serious heart rhythm problems, she said.

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Another interesting finding, according to Vaccarino, is that ischemia with mental stress and with conventional stress were not strongly related to each other, suggesting that they occur through different pathways.

“This points to the fact that stress provoked by emotions has a distinct mechanism of risk for heart disease and its complications compared with physical stress,” she noted. (IANS)

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Excess Fat Around The Belly May Increase The Risk of Heart Attack: Study

According to the researchers, waist circumference was a more important marker of recurrent events than overall obesity

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Obesity
Increasing abdominal obesity is independently associated with fatal and non-fatal heart attacks and strokes, regardless of other risk factors (such as smoking, diabetes, hypertension, blood pressure, blood lipids and body mass index [BMI]) and secondary prevention treatments. Pixabay

Heart patients, please take note. Researchers have found that heart attack survivors who carry excess fat around their waist are at increased risk of another heart attack.

“Abdominal obesity not only increases your risk for a first heart attack or stroke, but also the risk for recurrent events after the first misfortune,” said study author Hanieh Mohammadi from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden.

Prior studies have shown that abdominal obesity is an important risk factor for having a first heart attack. But until now, the association between abdominal obesity and the risk of a subsequent heart attack or stroke was unknown.

The research, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, followed more than 22,000 patients after their first heart attack and investigated the relation between abdominal obesity (measured by waist circumference) and the risk for recurrent cardiovascular disease events.

The researchers specifically looked at events caused by clogged arteries, such as fatal and non-fatal heart attack and stroke.

Patients were recruited from the nationwide SWEDEHEART registry and followed for a median of 3.8 years.

Most patients — 78 per cent of men and 90 per cent of women — had abdominal obesity (waist circumference 94 cm or above for men and 80 cm or above for women).

Increasing abdominal obesity was independently associated with fatal and non-fatal heart attacks and strokes, regardless of other risk factors (such as smoking, diabetes, hypertension, blood pressure, blood lipids and body mass index [BMI]) and secondary prevention treatments.

According to the researchers, waist circumference was a more important marker of recurrent events than overall obesity.

The reason abdominal obesity is very common in patients with a first heart attack is that it is closely linked with conditions that accelerate the clogging of arteries through atherosclerosi, the researchers said.

These conditions include increased blood pressure, high blood sugar and insulin resistance (diabetes) as well as raised blood lipid levels.

“Our results, however, suggest that there may be other negative mechanisms associated with abdominal obesity that are independent of these risk factors and remain unrecognised,” Mohammadi said.

heart Rate
Heart patients, please take note. Researchers have found that heart attack survivors who carry excess fat around their waist are at increased risk of another heart attack. Pixabay

“In our study, patients with increasing levels of abdominal obesity still had a raised risk for recurrent events despite being on therapies that lower traditional risk factors connected with abdominal obesity such as anti-hypertensives, diabetes medication and lipid lowering drugs,” she added.

According to the study, the relationship between waist circumference and recurrent events was stronger and more linear in men.

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“There were three times as many men in the study compared to women, contributing to less statistical power in the female group. Therefore, more studies are needed before definite conclusions can be drawn according to gender,” Mohammadi noted. (IANS)