Friday October 19, 2018

Nadda unveils the cornerstone of National Cancer Institute in Jhajjar

0
//
62
Republish
Reprint

Jhajjar (Haryana):  Union Health Minister JP Nadda, who on Saturday laid the foundation stone of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) here, said the institution will be a boon for the patients suffering from cancer in the country.

NCI will be the nodal institution for all activities related to cancer in the country and will have linkages with all regional and other cancer centres within the country. Equipped with cutting edge technology, the premier institution will have 26 operation theatres, five linear accelerators, four PET scanners, three Brachytherapy, three CT scanners, two MRI scanners and other facilities.

There are approximately 30 lakh cases of cancer in India out of which nearly 6 lakh patients die each year while about 11.5 lakh new cases occur every year. This calls for an urgent need to understand the various causes of cancer specific to our country, and to our lifestyle – which is why this National Cancer Institute is being built on priority,

Earlier the hospital was being operated from a building at the outskirts of Jhajjar with a bed strength of 18 beds which later expanded to 182 beds and catered to over one lakh cancer patients every year.

According to World Health Organization, cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for approximately 7.6 million deaths.

Nadda said the institute will be modeled after the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of US and the Indian government has already entered into a MoU with it during the visit of Prime Minister Narendra Modi to the United States in October 2014.

The total cost for establishment of NCI will be approximately Rs.2,035 crore and it will be completed in next three years. The institute will have 710 beds out of which 200 beds will be dedicated for translational research in India specific cancers. There will be 372 units of flats and 1, 080 hostel rooms for the staff members.

For the patient’s attendants, a night shelter having a capacity of 800 units is also being planned.

The minister also announced that apart from NCI, the institution will also have several centers for research and innovation in areas like genomics and proteomics, bioinformatics and health informatics, stem cell and regenerative science and nano biomedicine. (IANS)

(Picture Courtesy:www.news18.com)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Smoking costs Global economy more than $1 Trillion a year, will kill one-third more people by 2030 than it does now: Study

That cost far outweighs global revenues from tobacco taxes, which the WHO estimated at about $269 billion in 2013-2014

0
FILE - Cigarette packs are seen on shelves in a tobacco shop in Cagnes-sur-Mer, France, VOA

Smoking costs the global economy more than $1 trillion a year, and will kill one-third more people by 2030 than it does now, according to a study by the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Cancer Institute published on Tuesday.

That cost far outweighs global revenues from tobacco taxes, which the WHO estimated at about $269 billion in 2013-2014.

“The number of tobacco-related deaths is projected to increase from about 6 million deaths annually to about 8 million annually by 2030, with more than 80 percent of these occurring in LMICs [low- and middle-income countries],” the study said.

Around 80 percent of smokers live in such countries, and although smoking prevalence was falling among the global population, the total number of smokers worldwide is rising, it said.

Health experts say tobacco use is the single biggest preventable cause of death globally.

“It is responsible for… likely over $1 trillion in health care costs and lost productivity each year,” said the study, peer-reviewed by more than 70 scientific experts.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

The economic costs are expected to continue to rise, and although governments have the tools to reduce tobacco use and associated deaths, most have fallen far short of using those tools effectively, said the 688-page report.

“Government fears that tobacco control will have an adverse economic impact are not justified by the evidence. The science is clear; the time for action is now.”

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

How to quit

Cheap and effective policies included hiking tobacco taxes and prices, comprehensive smoke-free policies, complete bans on tobacco company marketing, and prominent pictorial warning labels.

Tobacco taxes could also be used to fund more expensive interventions such as anti-tobacco mass media campaigns and support for cessation services and treatments, it said.

Governments spent less than $1 billion on tobacco control in 2013-2014, according to a WHO estimate.

Tobacco regulation meanwhile is reaching a crunch point because of a trade dispute brought by Cuba, Indonesia, Honduras and Dominican Republic against Australia’s stringent “plain packaging” laws, which enforce standardized designs on tobacco products and ban distinctive logos and colorful branding.

The World Trade Organization is expected to rule on the complaint this year. Australia’s policy is being closely watched by other countries that are considering similar policies, including Norway, Slovenia, Canada, Singapore, Belgium and South Africa, the study said. (VOA)