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Namami Gange: Organic farming to be promoted on the banks of river Ganga

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  • National Mission for Clean Ganga announces the adoption of Organic farming on the banks of river Ganga
  • Union Water Resources Minister Uma Bharti and Agriculture Minister Radha Mohan Singh attended the MoU signing event
  • The government wants to ensure that there is a drop in input costs, while the income of farmers goes up

Delhi, Sept 17 2016: The Union Water Resources Ministry on Friday signed an MoU with the Agriculture Ministry to promote organic farming on the banks of the river Ganga.

As per the MoU, villagers residing in 1,657 villages along the river, starting from Uttarakhand to West Bengal, will be encouraged to adopt organic farming.

As per the agreement under the ‘Namami Gange’ project, each gram panchayat will be treated as a cluster under the Paramparagat Krishi Vikas Yojana (PKVY) and will be provided training on Integrated Nutrient Management and micro-irrigation techniques by the Agriculture Ministry, an official source said.

Union Water Resources Minister Uma Bharti and Agriculture Minister Radha Mohan Singh attended the MoU signing event.

Union Misnister of Water Resources- Uma Bharti. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Union Misnister of Water Resources- Uma Bharti. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

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“Signing of this MoU will ensure effective and efficient implementation of various projects of ‘Namami Gange’ in coordination with the Agriculture Ministry,” Uma Bharti said.

“I hope the Agriculture Ministry will play a major role in the success of ‘Namami Gange’ programme,” she added.

The agreement also says that all related information will be provided through mobile applications and awareness will be spread about the side-effects of using chemicals, fertilisers and insecticides in farming.

Radha Mohan Singh said in order to train farmers in organic farming, the government plans to launch ‘Deen Dayal Unnat Krishi Shiksha Abhiyan’ on September 25, marking the birth centenary of Jan Sangh ideologue Deen Dayal Upadhyaya.

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“We want to train 15,000 farmers in organic farming in 2016 across the country through Indian Council of Agricultural Research. The government wants to ensure that there is a drop in input costs, while the income of farmers goes up,” Singh said.

The progress of the implementation of this the will be monitored by a steering committee consisting of the nodal officers from each ministry. The committee will meet periodically, sources said.

Minister of State for Water Resources Sanjeev Balyan and senior officials attended the programme. (IANS)

  • Enakshi

    That seems to be a good idea

  • Ayushi Gaur

    A great boost to the economy

  • Yokeshwari Manivel

    it should be promoted everywhere no only ganga but all the resources which are being endangered

Next Story

India to Set up Bio-Gas Plants to Tackle Pollution, but Experts Unsure

India Plans Bio-Gas Plants to Tackle Toxic Pollution, But Experts Skeptical

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Farmer India
An Indian farmer walks through his paddy field as he burns the paddy husk in Chandigarh, India. VOA

India is planning to set up more than 100 bio-gas plants and provide thousands of farmers with machines to dispose of crop stubble in a bid to halt the choking crop-burning pollution that blights the country every winter.

A major source of the smog that engulfs vast swathes of northern India, including the capital New Delhi, is the burning the straw and stubble of the previous rice crop to prepare for new planting in October and November.

New Delhi is regularly judged to be one of the world’s most polluted major cities.

Government-backed Indian Oil Corp Ltd will invite private companies to apply to set up 140 bio-gas plants that will use rice stubble as feed stock, said two government officials, who didn’t wish to be identified in line with official policy.

The plants would cost 35 billion rupees ($487.67 million) and each would require two tons of crop residue every hour for at least 300 days to produce “an optimum amount” of compressed natural gas (CNG), one of the sources said.

The government would earmark funds for the project that would make it attractive for farmers to sell their waste rather than burn it, they said.

India pollution
A woman crosses a railway line on a smoggy morning in New Delhi, India. VOA

The stubble pollution has become more acute in recent years because mechanized harvesters leave more residue than crops plucked by hand.

Other than helping farmers sell their residue to the new bio-gas plants, the government would provide 100,000 new machines every year to farmers to dispose of the farm waste in their fields, the sources said.

“We’ll give farmers the choice to either get rid of crop residue or sell it to the bio CNG plants,” one of the sources said.

Doubts persist

Environmental experts were skeptical.

Also Read- Pollution-Linked Deaths Highest in India: Study

“Given the amount of resources that the government has, what will decide the efficacy of this plan is consistent engagement with farmers,” said Nandikesh Sivalingam, a program manager for Greenpeace.

“But if you expect results next winter, it can’t happen.” (VOA)