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Narendra Modi’s Make in India drawing crowds to trade fair

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New Delhi: The 35th edition of India’s largest trade fair has commenced on a high note here, drawing huge crowds to the sprawling Pragati Maidan fairgrounds on the very first day, some of the sellers attributing the overwhelming response to Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Make in India mantra.

Over 7,000 domestic and foreign firms are participating in the India International Trade Fair (IITF) 2015. Firms from 28 countries are participating.

As a partner country, Afghanistan had its own pavilion at the exposition with around 50 stalls selling handmade jewellery, watches, world renowned Afghani carpets, kaftans, saffron and dry fruit which is a hot seller.

As one enters the pavilion, there are stalls adorned with garlands of dry figs and the aroma of saffron in the area. And, aiming at potential women buyers, is the Afghani Lapis Lazuli stoned jewellery.

“Considering it’s the start of the fair, we have had a very good sale and have noticed huge numbers of buyers compared to the previous years. India’s push for Make in India could be doing the trick,” said Shirin Qahraman, a woman entreprenuer from Kabul.

Qahraman’s store has an exclusive collection of Lapis Lazuli neck-pieces, rings and bracelets. The neck-pieces start at Rs 2,000 and go as high as Rs 10,000.

For Sado Zai, 32, a retail carpet seller from Kabul, the fair has been extremely helpful in marketing his products across the world.

“The trade fair has been enabling us showcase our products to people around the world. I now have a few clients in India who import my carpets regularly. Through Make in India project, we are exploring ways to set up a business here,” Zai told agencies as he exhibited his wares.

The Afghani carpets are priced anywhere between Rs.5,000 and Rs.50,000, depending on their size.

As enthusiastic were the sellers about the fair, many expressed concern that the rent they have to pay for their stalls has skyrocketed.

“For a stall of 10×6 feet, manned by two people, the rent is as high as $4,500 for the (two-week) duration of the fair. If this continues, it would be difficult for us to return in future,” Qahraman said.

Also grabbing eyeballs at the fair were Turkish stalls with their bright glass lamps, ceramics and the well-known Turkish tea pots.

The Chinese pavilion is displaying a large number of technology-related products like water purifiers, energy-saving room heaters and food processors, among others.

Indian khadi stalls – with products from across the country – are also a huge hit. Stall owners hoped their earnings would reach the Rs.6-8 lakh mark with the government’s push for the sector.

Rashi Kumar, a bank professional, has been visiting the fair for the past 10 years and said the variety of products displayed by foreign participants is much better this year.

“I have noticed many new countries participating this year, with a wider variety of products,” Kumar said, although the organizers last year announced the participation of delegations from 41 countries.

(Bhavana Akella, IANS)

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Make in India Most Beneficial For Mobile Manufacturers

How mobile manufacturing made the most of 'Make in India'

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Mobile manufacturers
India is today the second-largest mobile phone manufacturer in the world after China. Pixabay

From just two mobile phone manufacturing units in 2014 to 268 mobile handset and accessories manufacturing units in 2019 which has led to 95 per cent of mobile phones sold in the country being produced domestically, the star in India’s “Make in India” story is indeed shining.

In fact, India is today the second-largest mobile phone manufacturer in the world after China. “India has achieved tremendous success in mobile phone and component manufacturing in the last four years with more than 95 per cent of domestic consumption now being produced in India,” Pankaj Mohindroo, Chairman, India Cellular and Electronics Association (ICEA), told IANS.

“Our domestic market viz-a-viz domestic manufacturing is saturated and we have set our sights on a target of Rs 7.7 lakh crore of exports by 2025,” he added. According to a survey conducted by mobile industry body ICEA, the 268 mobile handset and accessories manufacturing units employ about 6.7 lakh people.

Mobile manufacturer
In India, 268 mobile handset and accessories manufacturing units employ about 6.7 lakh people. Pixabay

So today the phones that most Indians hold in their hands are made in India, thanks mainly to schemes such as Modified Special Incentive Package Scheme (M-SIPS) to provide financial incentives across the ESDM value chain to compensate for cost disability in manufacturing and Electronics Manufacturing Clusters (EMC).

Launched in 2012, the M-SIPS, provides capital subsidy of 25 per cent for electronics industry located in non-SEZ (Special Economic Zone) areas and 20 per cent for those in SEZ areas.

The Electronics Manufacturing Clusters (EMC) scheme, which was also launched in 2012, encouraged entities, including state governments, to provide good quality infrastructure within a cluster.

mobile manufacturer
Uttar Pradesh has emerged as the new hub of mobile manufacturing in the country over the past few years. Pixabay

Under the scheme, 50 per cent of the project cost for Greenfield Electronics Manufacturing Clusters and 75 per cent for Brownfield Electronics Manufacturing Clusters is given as grant. Due to the focus on “Make in India” and “Digital India” programmes, Uttar Pradesh has emerged as the new hub of mobile manufacturing in the country over the past few years.

In July 2018, Samsung launched the world’s largest mobile factory in Noida. The new facility was set up with the aim of doubling its capacity for mobile phones in Noida from 68 million units a year to 120 million units a year, in a phase-wise expansion to be completed by 2020.

Besides Samsung, most Chinese smartphone makers which now dominate the Indian market – Xiaomi, Oppo and Vivo — also produce their phones in the country. Apple has already started the assembling of iPhone 7 at its supplier Wistron’s facility in Bengaluru. Production of cellular mobile handsets in volume terms reached 225 million units in 2017-18, as compared to production of 60 million units in 2014-15.

Also Read: Why PM Modi Acted Now on Kashmir?

The National Policy on Electronics 2019 has set the aim of promoting domestic manufacturing and export in the entire value-chain of ESDM (Electronics System Design and Manufacturing) for economic development to achieve a turnover of Rs 26 lakh crore by 2025. This will include targeted production of one billion mobile handsets by 2025, valued at Rs 13 lakh crore, including 600 million mobile handsets valued at Rs 7 lakh crore for export.

India currently has over 450 million smartphone users. The number of smartphone users in the country is expected to reach 859 million by 2022, according to an ASSOCHAM-PwC joint study. (IANS)