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NASA joins Norway’s annual oil spill cleanup exercise

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Washington: NASA for the first time, participated in Norway’s annual oil spill cleanup exercise in the North Sea from June 8 to 11.

Scientists flew a specialised NASA airborne instrument, called the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), on NASA’s C-20A piloted research aircraft to monitor a controlled release of oil into the sea, testing the radar’s ability to distinguish between more and less damaging types of oil slicks, NASA said in a statement.

Norway’s Oil on Water exercise has been held annually since the 1980s and in these drills, oil is released onto the ocean and then recovered, giving responders experience with existing cleanup techniques and equipment and a chance to test new technologies.

“This year was special, because we had our own dedicated science experiment in the middle of the training exercise,” said Camilla Brekke, associate professor in the department of physics and technology, at the University of Tromso, Norway.

Brekke invited scientists Cathleen Jones and Ben Holt from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, to participate in the experiment.

Radars “see” an oil spill, because of a characteristic that the Greek philosopher Aristotle first wrote about 2,500 years ago: pouring oil on water smooths the surface.

The Norwegian exercise released emulsions of differing thicknesses, so that the scientists could have a range of conditions to calibrate the UAVSAR data.

The experiment also tested the instrument’s ability to distinguish between petroleum, and plant-based oil, found in algal blooms.

Norway is one of a few nations worldwide that allow oil to be discharged at sea, to test new cleanup technologies and procedures. (IANS)

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NASA’s Planet-Hunting Telescope Lifts Off In U.S.

Rocket with planet-hunting telescope finally lifts off

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NASA's next mission.
TESS, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, is shown in this conceptual illustration obtained by Reuters on March 28, 2018. NASA sent TESS into orbit from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket April 18, 2018, on a two-year mission. VOA

A Falcon 9 rocket blasted off Wednesday carrying SpaceX’s first high-priority science mission for NASA, a planet-hunting space telescope whose launch had been delayed for two days by a rocket-guidance glitch.

The Transit Exoplanet Survey Satellite, or TESS, lifted off from Florida’s Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 6:51 p.m. EDT, starting the clock on a two-year quest to detect more worlds circling stars beyond our solar system that might harbor life.

The main-stage booster successfully separated from the upper stage of the rocket and headed back to Earth on a self-guided return flight to an unmanned landing vessel floating in the Atlantic.

Also Read: Why NASA sent human sperm to space?

The first stage, which can be recycled for future flights, then landed safely on the ocean platform, according to SpaceX launch team announcers on NASA TV.

Liftoff followed a postponement forced by a technical glitch in the rocket’s guidance-control system.  VOA

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