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NASA’s Dawn Mission- New Orbit, New Opportunities

NASA's Dawn probe moving to lowest-ever orbit around Ceres

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NASA, Microsoft
After lettuce, astronauts could grow beans in space in 2021. Pixabay

NASA’s Dawn spacecraft is set to reach in early June its new, final orbit which will be less than 50 kilometres above the surface of the inner solar system’s only dwarf planet — 10 times closer than the spacecraft has ever been.

Soon after, it will begin collecting images and other science data, and that very low orbit will also garner some of Dawn’s closest images yet, NASA said on Thursday.

The spacecraft will collect gamma ray and neutron spectra, which help scientists understand variations in the chemical makeup of Ceres’ uppermost layer.

“The team is eagerly awaiting the detailed composition and high-resolution imaging from the new, up-close examination,” said Dawn’s Principal Investigator Carol Raymond of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.

NASA
Representational Image, VOA

“These new high-resolution data allow us to test theories formulated from the previous data sets and discover new features of this fascinating dwarf planet,” Raymond added.

Dawn was launched in 2007 and has been exploring the two largest bodies in the main asteroid belt, Vesta and Ceres, to uncover new insights into our solar system. It entered Ceres’ orbit in March 2015.

The transfer from Dawn’s previous orbit to its final one is not as simple as making a lane change.

Also Read: NASA Probe to ‘Touch’ the Sun Will Carry 1.1 mn Names

Dawn’s operations team worked for months to plot the course for this second extended mission of the spacecraft, which is propelled by an ion engine.

Engineers mapped out more than 45,000 possible trajectories before devising a plan that will allow the best science observations, NASA said. (IANS)

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This NASA Scientist is so Excited about Mercury Transit. Here’s Why

The tiny planet traveled directly between Earth and the sun on Monday, creating a perfect alignment

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NASA, Scientist, Mercury
The planet Mercury is seen in silhouette, low center, from Washington, as it transits across the face of the Sun, Nov. 11, 2019. (Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls). VOA

Stargazers witnessed a rare celestial event on Monday, as Mercury passed directly across the face of the sun.NASA

Mercury, the solar system’s smallest planet and closest to the sun, won’t make the next such transit until 2032.

The tiny planet traveled directly between Earth and the sun on Monday, creating a perfect alignment.

The best views of the event took place in North and South America, while viewers in Europe and Africa were able to see part of Mercury’s passage.

NASA, Scientist, Mercury
Mercury, the solar system’s smallest planet and closest to the sun, won’t make the next such transit until 2032. Pixabay

Stargazers had to use solar-filtered binoculars and telescopes to spot Mercury, which appeared as a small black dot on the face of the sun.

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For those who could not see the event directly, the U.S. Space agency, NASA, live-streamed images of the celestial transit, which took about five and a half hours. (VOA)