Saturday April 20, 2019

National Geographic to Launch new Mini-Series ‘Mars’ that will unfold Mankind’s First Voyage to the Red Planet in Future

The show will depict the first manned mission to Mars in the year 2033

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Mars, Source: NASA

November 13, 2016: After uncountable movies and artworks on space travel and extraterrestrial science fiction, now National Geographic brings to us “Mars” which is set to release on November 14 in the US and online on 13 November globally. This mini-series unfolds mankind’s first voyage to the red planet in the future.

The show is about to depict the first manned mission to Mars in the year 2033. “Mars” is scripted uniquely and has present day interviews with experts amidst everything. It works constantly with current and historic context to create a very different storytelling.

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We have been obsessed about setting our foot on the planet for a long time. This show not only tells us how heavy, reaching the planet is; but also tells us that survival on Mars will be a much more difficult task.

The six-part depiction of the journey had inputs and advice from experts and space enthusiasts like Elon Musk of SpaceX and the CEO of Tesla motors to make the production as realistic as possible, mentioned PTI. At the premiere of “Mars” in New York, Justin Wilkes, a producer at RadicalMedia revealed that the team had been granted complete access to the SpaceX team and its brilliant minds.

Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX. Wikimedia.
Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX. Wikimedia.

Many other people were interviewed for “Mars” other than the space enthusiasts. The effects of the journey on the human behavior and psyche were discussed by Psychologist Davis Dinges.

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The policy implications of sending colonists to unclaimed territories were revealed by Casey Dreier, the director of space policy for the Planetary Society, and Thomas Kalil, the Deputy Director at the White House Office of Science and Technology. Elon Musk said that humanity will either travel to distant planets and settle down on different planets or remain on Earth and wait for an eventual extinction.

This stellar venture brings great directors like Brian Grazer and Michael Rosenberg of Imagine Entertainment and Justin Wilkes, Jon Kamen, and Dave OConnor of RadicalMedia and Mexican filmmaker Everardo Gout under one roof to work on a semi sci-fi masterpiece.

SpaceX spaceship. Pixabay.
SpaceX spaceship. Pixabay

The production of such magnitude required unfathomable efforts. Even the scripted portions had to be realistic and thus, needed professional inputs and advice. The on-camera efforts are just the tip of the iceberg. Daniela Ciancio, the designer of the futuristic spacesuits revealed that her main inspiration was the BioSuit concept designed at MIT.

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Bobby Braun, a professor from Georgia Tech was the technical aid to keep the show realistic. He designed the spacecraft Daedalus in “Mars”.

The mini-series was shot in Morocco and Budapest. The scripted part stars various actors including Sammi Rotibi , Ben Cotton, Jihae and Alberto Ammann embarking on their maiden voyage to the red planet in 2033.

– prepared by Shivam Thaker of NewsGram. Twitter: @Shivam_Thaker

Next Story

Major Achievement! Scientists Take The First-Ever Image of Black Hole

At the press conference, researchers told the story about how it was much quicker to take the data by plane to the various supercomputers being used to analyze the information.

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Black Hole
An image of the black hole at the center of Messier 87, a massive galaxy in the nearby Virgo galaxy cluster. This black hole resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5-billion times that of the sun. VOA

Using eight radio telescopes literally spanning the globe, scientists have taken the first-ever photograph of a black hole.

The supermassive black hole is at the center of a huge galaxy called M-87, which is 55 million light-years from Earth.

The picture, the result of decades of work by the Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration (EHTC), isn’t much to look at. It’s a fuzzy orange and yellow donut floating in space, but the implications for physics, and the incredibly intricate way that researchers got the picture, is science at its best.

The picture is exactly what scientists, particularly the late Albert Einstein, predicted it would look like. There is the eponymous center black hole where gravity is so powerful even light cannot escape, and a circular area of superheated energy rotating around the celestial entity at nearly the speed of light, called the event horizon.

“We now know that a black hole that weighs 6.5 billion times what our sun does exists in the center of M-87,” EHTC scientist Shep Doeleman announced at a press conference Wednesday in Washington. “And this is the strongest evidence that we have to date for the existence of black holes.”

This picture is so important because while scientists have been seeing the effects that black holes have on the structures around them, they have never actually seen one, and this photo in effect proves their existence, as well as one of the foundational principles of Einstein’s theory of general relativity.

200 scientists

At its center, the black hole is so big that even though it’s a long distance away, scientists reasoned it was likely to be the largest such structures viewable from Earth. For that reason, M-87 was chosen for the experiment.

More than 200 scientists worked for about a decade to link the global network of eight radio telescopes, using atomic clocks. One by one in an exact sequence, the instruments were pointed at M-87 at what was, in effect, the same time, back in April 2017.

When the experiment was over, the researchers had five petabytes — or a million gigabytes — of visual information to review. At the press conference, researchers told the story about how it was much quicker to take the data by plane to the various supercomputers being used to analyze the information. They said this was easier than trying to transfer that much data into the cloud.

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The supermassive black hole is at the center of a huge galaxy called M-87, which is 55 million light-years from Earth.Pixabay

It took two weeks for a group of supercomputers to analyze the data and begin to form all the collected information into the modest photo that scientists released Wednesday.

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And once that photo was collected, the researchers waited two years to publish their data while scientists from all over the world checked their work and signed off on the idea that what was photographed was actually a black hole.

What happens now?

The team isn’t done, though. They already are planning to create even bigger telescopes than the Earth-sized one they used by incorporating space telescopes like the Hubble and the soon-to-be-launched James Webb Space Telescope. This should allow researchers to take photos of dozens of other black holes. (VOA)