Wednesday April 24, 2019

National Museum’s ‘Ram Katha’ paintings to be showcased in Australia

0
//
01
By Newsgram Staff Writer
The multifarious paintings from the ‘Ram Katha’ set of collections painted between the 17th and the 19th Century will be acquired by the National Gallery of Australia (NGA) in Canberra from the National Museum next month.
Curator Vijay Kumar Mathur, who has selected the 101 paintings in chronological progression capturing the story of the Ramayana, said, “These miniatures represent a matured movement that colorfully visualizes the spirit of the Ramayana.”
The collection is one of India’s richest artefacts, he further added and also recalled the National Museum organizing a “Rama-Katha” exhibition in 2013, after which it travelled to Belgium.
Pooled in from India’s northern, central and eastern territories, the grand body of artwork will be on display in the 1967-founded NGA for three months from May 22.
Director-general of National Museum, Venu V said, “The Rama-Katha is part of this oral inheritance where the epic has grown many layers, as is the case with interpretations around it through ages. Introducing the Ramayana story to Australian audiences through this exhibition will also be a great opportunity to bring international histories closer.”

Next Story

Australia Passes Social Media Law Over Violent Content

The Law Council of Australia said the legislation could have "serious unintended consequences", CNN reported

0
carbon, digital
Multiple apps are displayed on an iPhone in New York. VOA

Internet providers and tech giants like Facebook and Google will be compelled to remove violent content in a sweeping new law passed in Australia on Thursday.

Under the new law, which passed both houses of Parliament, obligations will be placed on internet companies to stop the spread of violent material. Failure to do so could see executives face up to three years in jail, or fines of up to 10 per cent of the platform’s annual turnover, reports CNN.

The development comes in the wake of the March 15 Christchurch which was live streamed on social media by the shooter while he killed 50 worshippers in two mosques.

Platforms have struggled in the weeks since to remove copies of the video, which have been repeatedly uploaded.

“The tragedy in Christchurch just over two weeks ago brought this issue to a head,” Australian Attorney General Christian Porter said in a statement on Thursday.

Social media
An illustration picture shows a man starting his Twitter app on a mobile device in Hanau near Frankfurt. VOA

“It was clear from our discussions last week with social media companies, particularly Facebook, that there was no recognition of the need for them to act urgently to protect their own users from the horror of the live streaming of the Christchurch massacre and other violent crimes, and so the (government) has taken action with this legislation.”

The law was passed with the support of the opposition Labor Party and despite strenuous objections from industry bodies and some lawmakers, who warned against a knee-jerk rush to pass legislation that could have far-reaching ramifications.

Also Read- After Pixel Devices, Google Duplex Reaching iOS Users in US Cities

The Law Council of Australia said the legislation could have “serious unintended consequences”, CNN reported.

“Making social media companies and their executives criminally liable for the live streaming of criminal content is a serious step which requires careful consideration. Furthermore, the proposed legislation should not absolve the government taking steps to prevent crimes being live streamed,” Law Council President Arthur Moses SC said in a statement. (IANS)