Monday February 18, 2019

National Museum’s ‘Ram Katha’ paintings to be showcased in Australia

0
//
01
By Newsgram Staff Writer
The multifarious paintings from the ‘Ram Katha’ set of collections painted between the 17th and the 19th Century will be acquired by the National Gallery of Australia (NGA) in Canberra from the National Museum next month.
Curator Vijay Kumar Mathur, who has selected the 101 paintings in chronological progression capturing the story of the Ramayana, said, “These miniatures represent a matured movement that colorfully visualizes the spirit of the Ramayana.”
The collection is one of India’s richest artefacts, he further added and also recalled the National Museum organizing a “Rama-Katha” exhibition in 2013, after which it travelled to Belgium.
Pooled in from India’s northern, central and eastern territories, the grand body of artwork will be on display in the 1967-founded NGA for three months from May 22.
Director-general of National Museum, Venu V said, “The Rama-Katha is part of this oral inheritance where the epic has grown many layers, as is the case with interpretations around it through ages. Introducing the Ramayana story to Australian audiences through this exhibition will also be a great opportunity to bring international histories closer.”

Next Story

Great Barrier Reef Faces Australian Floods Dirty Water

The water has not dispersed due to its size and a recent lack of wind.

0
Australia, floods
The water has not dispersed due to its size and a recent lack of wind. Pixabay

Dirty water from a flood crisis in north Australia has spread to parts of the Great Barrier Reef, placing it under stress, scientists have said. The floods are the result of weeks of devastating rain in Queensland. Some regions experienced the equivalent of a year’s rainfall in 10 days.

Aerial pictures show that run-off from one river has blanketed some reef areas more than 60 kilometres from shore, the BBC reported on Friday.

The UN calls the Great Barrier Reef, located in the Coral Sea off the coast of Queensland, the “most biodiverse” of all the World Heritage sites, and of “enormous scientific and intrinsic importance”.

Australia, flood
The floods are the result of weeks of devastating rain in Queensland. Pixabay

Scientists fear the sediment-laden waters may be blocking out light and effectively “smothering” coral.

In recent weeks, run-off from several rivers has coalesced to affect an approximately 600 kilometre stretch of the reef’s outer edges, scientists said. The water has not dispersed due to its size and a recent lack of wind.

The water has not dispersed due to its size and a recent lack of wind.The water has not dispersed due to its size and a recent lack of wind.

ALSO READ: Donald Trump to Declare ‘Emergency’, Use Military Funds for Mexico Border Wall

Frederieke Kroon from the Australian Institute of Marine Science said the nutrient-rich water had also sparked algae growth in some areas, turning waters “a thick blanket of green”.

The reef is already facing threats to its survival such as coral bleaching caused by warmer sea temperatures. It has also been damaged by cyclones. (IANS)