Tuesday March 20, 2018
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Nearing the doomsday: Rising sea levels drowning metropolitan cities of the world

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New Delhi: According to a report recently published which looks toward the ice sheets of Antarctica, the alarming rise in the sea levels can be responsible for the drowning of major coastal cities.

The study suggests the aftermath can manifest into an increase of a three feat rise in the sea levels by the end of this century. Though it is reported that the low-lying cites as New York and Hong Kong will be at the downside, the authors are most concerned about metropolises like that of Boston, which are vulnerable to face an over five feet extension of the sea levels at the close of the coming century.

The Climate Change Summit, which has held last year in Paris, had the prominent leaders of the world pledging to cut the carbon greenhouse gas emissions and keeping the surge of global warming under the mark of 2 degrees Celsius.

Unfortunately, Pollard and DeConte in their report write that upon the evaluation of the data, it can be said that the final conclusions are overriding the predictions made by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. And apparently, those were considered, till recently as the worst-case scenario affecting our planet.

By 2100, there can be a rise of about two meters upon melting of ice in the poles. Pollard, opines that the probable effects to follow this will be something like the hazardous form of Hurricane Sandy, one which will have the potential to contribute to future flood losses.

Both Pollard and DeCante says that the rise in the sea levels will be accounting to an estimate of nearly 50 meters in Antarctica alone, and all of these will be taking place by 2500. While the latter is of the opinion, as given in an interview, that the global warming will be trapping the coastal cities and the defense mechanisms will be proven to be ineffective then.

Still, the calling of the doomsday can be countered, as stated by DeConte by curtailing the dangerous emissions and keeping the Antarctica, well frozen.

(Inputs from huffingtonpost.com)

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Arctic permafrost may unleash carbon within decades: NASA

Plants remove carbon dioxide from the air during photosynthesis, so increased plant growth means less carbon in the atmosphere

NASA to release two missions focused on moon soon in 2022. Pixabay
NASA's new instrument can measure incoming solar energy. Pixabay
  • Permafrost in Northern Arctic can potentially become a permanent source of Carbon
  • It was previously thought to be safe from the effects of Global Warming
  • Rising temperature in the Arctic can cause severe carbon emissions

Permafrost in the coldest northern Arctic — formerly thought to be at least temporarily shielded from global warming by its extreme environment — could thaw enough to become a permanent source of carbon to the atmosphere in a few decades, warns a NASA-led study. This will happen in this century, with the peak transition occurring in 40 to 60 years, said the study.

Permafrost in Northern Arctic can become a permanent source of carbon in this century itself, according to NASA. Wikimedia Commons
Permafrost in Northern Arctic can become a permanent source of carbon in this century itself, according to NASA. Wikimedia Commons

Permafrost is soil that has remained frozen for years or centuries under topsoil. It contains carbon-rich organic material, such as leaves, that froze without decaying, NASA said in a statement on Tuesday.

As rising Arctic air temperatures cause permafrost to thaw, the organic material decomposes and releases its carbon to the atmosphere in the form of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane.

The researchers calculated that as thawing continues, by the year 2300, total carbon emissions from the coldest northern Arctic will be 10 times as much as all human-produced fossil fuel emissions in 2016.

Warmer, more southerly permafrost regions will not become a carbon source until the end of the 22nd century, even though they are thawing now, said the study led by scientist Nicholas Parazoo of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

That is because other changing Arctic processes will counter the effect of thawing soil in these regions.

The finding that the colder region would transition sooner than the warmer one came as a surprise, according to Parazoo. The researchers used data on soil temperatures in Alaska and Siberia and a numerical model that calculates changes in carbon emissions as plants grow and permafrost thaws in response to climate change.

They assessed when the Arctic will transition to a carbon source instead of the carbon-neutral area it is today — with some processes removing about as much carbon from the atmosphere as other processes emit.

World is under threat due to Global Warming. Wikimedia Commons

They divided the Arctic into two regions of equal size, a colder northern region and a warmer, more southerly belt encircling the northern region. There is far more permafrost in the northern region than in the southern one.

Over the course of the model simulations, northern permafrost lost about five times more carbon per century than southern permafrost.

The southern region transitioned more slowly in the model simulations, Parazoo said, because plant growth increased much faster than expected in the south.

Also Read: Global warming portends ill for India’s flourishing Dairy sector: Experts

Plants remove carbon dioxide from the air during photosynthesis, so increased plant growth means less carbon in the atmosphere.

According to the model, as the southern Arctic grows warmer, increased photosynthesis will balance increased permafrost emissions until the late 2100s. IANS