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Nestle Pays Starbucks $7.1bn to Sell its Coffee

Nestle in $7.1bn Starbucks coffee deal

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Nestle Pays Starbucks $7.1bn to Sell its Coffee.
Nestle Paid Starbucks $7.1bn to Sell its Coffee. Pixabay

Food giant Nestle on Monday announced a $7.1 billion deal with Starbucks for the rights to sell the chains coffee, tea and food products in grocery stores and other outlets globally.

The Swiss consumer goods giant said 500 Starbucks employees would transfer over to its business but they would continue to be located in Seattle, the group’s headquarters for the last 47 years.

Starbucks coffee
Starbucks coffee. Pixabay

The Nescafe and Nespresso owner would own the rights to market Starbucks’ coffee, which it says generates $2 billion in annual sales, the BBC reported.

Nestle chief executive Mark Schneider, who in 2016 became the first outsider to run Nestle in almost 100 years and who is attempting to boost the company’s profit through expansion, described it as a “significant step”.

Also Read: Californian Court Warns “Coffee causes Cancer!”

The company last sold its US sweets and chocolate business, including brands such as Crunch and Butterfinger, to Ferrero Group for 2.7 billion Swiss francs.

Schneider described the “global coffee alliance” with Starbucks as “a great day for coffee lovers around the world”. (IANS)

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Coffee Compounds May Inhibit Growth of Prostate Cancer

It also showed the growth reduction occurred in transplanted tumour cells, rather than in native tumour cells

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Coffee can have both positive and negative effects. We need to find out more about the mechanisms behind these findings before we can think about clinical applications. Pixabay

Besides being the perfect morning drink, coffee may also play a role in delaying prostate cancer, finds a study, which may pave the way for treating drug-resistant cancer.

Scientists from Kanazawa University in Japan have identified kahweol acetate and cafestol — hydrocarbon compounds naturally found in Arabica coffee — which may inhibit growth of prostate cancer.

The pilot study showed kahweol acetate and cafestol can inhibit growth in cells that are resistant to common anti-cancer drugs like Cabazitaxel.

“We found that kahweol acetate and cafestol inhibited growth of cancer cells in mice, but the combination seemed to work synergistically, leading to a significantly slower tumour growth than in untreated mice,” said lead author Hiroaki Iwamoto.

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The pilot study showed kahweol acetate and cafestol can inhibit growth in cells that are resistant to common anti-cancer drugs like Cabazitaxel. Pixabay

For the study, presented at the European Association of Urology Congress in Barcelona, the team tested six compounds, naturally found in coffee, on proliferation of human prostate cancers cells in vitro (i.e. in a petri-dish).

They found cells treated with kahweol acetate and cafestol grew more slowly than controls. They then tested these compounds on prostate cancer cells, transplanted to mice (16 mice).

“After 11 days, the untreated tumours had grown by around three and a half times the original volume (342 per cent), whereas tumours in the mice treated with both compounds had grown by just over one and a half (167 per cent) times the original size,” Iwamoto said.

It also showed the growth reduction occurred in transplanted tumour cells, rather than in native tumour cells.

 

ALSO READ: Apple Watch Can Detect And Notify Users Irregular Heart Rhythms

Although “these are promising findings, but they should not make people change their coffee consumption,” cautioned Professor Atsushi Mizokami from the varsity.

“Coffee can have both positive and negative effects. We need to find out more about the mechanisms behind these findings before we can think about clinical applications. But if we can confirm these results, we may have candidates to treat drug-resistant prostate cancer,” Mizokami noted. (IANS)