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Nestle Pays Starbucks $7.1bn to Sell its Coffee

Nestle in $7.1bn Starbucks coffee deal

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Nestle Pays Starbucks $7.1bn to Sell its Coffee.
Nestle Paid Starbucks $7.1bn to Sell its Coffee. Pixabay

Food giant Nestle on Monday announced a $7.1 billion deal with Starbucks for the rights to sell the chains coffee, tea and food products in grocery stores and other outlets globally.

The Swiss consumer goods giant said 500 Starbucks employees would transfer over to its business but they would continue to be located in Seattle, the group’s headquarters for the last 47 years.

Starbucks coffee
Starbucks coffee. Pixabay

The Nescafe and Nespresso owner would own the rights to market Starbucks’ coffee, which it says generates $2 billion in annual sales, the BBC reported.

Nestle chief executive Mark Schneider, who in 2016 became the first outsider to run Nestle in almost 100 years and who is attempting to boost the company’s profit through expansion, described it as a “significant step”.

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The company last sold its US sweets and chocolate business, including brands such as Crunch and Butterfinger, to Ferrero Group for 2.7 billion Swiss francs.

Schneider described the “global coffee alliance” with Starbucks as “a great day for coffee lovers around the world”. (IANS)

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Your Genes Determine You As a Tea or Coffee Person

"The findings suggest our perception of bitter tastes, informed by our genetics, contributes to the preference for coffee, tea and alcohol," Cornelis said

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Representational image.
Your genes make you tea or coffee lover: Study. Pixabay

Are you a tea or coffee person? The answer may lie in your genetic predisposition towards bitter tastes, say researchers.

It could be because bitterness acts as a natural warning system to protect us from harmful substances.

The study, led by researchers from US-based Northwestern University, and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Australia, explored reactions to three bitter substances — caffeine, quinine and propylthiouracil (PROP) — to understand how they affect people’s preference for drinking tea, coffee and alcohol.

The findings showed that people who were more sensitive to caffeine and were drinking a lot of coffee consumed low amounts of tea.

In other words, people who have a heightened ability to taste coffee’s bitterness — and particularly the distinct bitter flavour of caffeine — learn to associate “good things with it”.

“You’d expect that people who are particularly sensitive to the bitter taste of caffeine would drink less coffee,” said Marilyn Cornelis, assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

tea
The findings showed that people who were more sensitive to caffeine and were drinking a lot of coffee consumed low amounts of tea. Pixabay

“The opposite results of our study suggest coffee consumers acquire a taste or an ability to detect caffeine due to the learned positive reinforcement (stimulation) elicited by caffeine.”

The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, also found that people sensitive to the bitter flavours of quinine and of PROP — a synthetic taste related to the compounds in cruciferous vegetables — avoid coffee.

For alcohol, a higher sensitivity to the bitterness of PROP resulted in lower alcohol consumption, particularly of red wine.

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“The findings suggest our perception of bitter tastes, informed by our genetics, contributes to the preference for coffee, tea and alcohol,” Cornelis said.

Scientists applied Mendelian randomisation — a technique commonly used in disease epidemiology — to test the causal relationship between bitter taste and beverage consumption in more than 4,00,000 men and women in the UK. (IANS)