Sunday January 26, 2020
Home Lead Story New Guinness ...

New Guinness World Record: Lebanon Now With Highest National Flags Raised in A City

"Today they were capable of raising thousands of Lebanese flags to enter the Guinness book. This is a national initiative which reflects Beirut's role and which implicates no flag other than the Lebanese will be raised in Beirut"

0
//
flag
After raising the flag that broke the world record, MP Tabsh congratulated the Beirut Alive Association for this remarkable individual and national initiative by excellence, adorning Beirut with thousands of Lebanese flags and entering the Book of Guinness. Pixabay

Lebanon’s capital Beirut has set a new Guinness World Record for the number of national flags raised in a city for 24 hours.

The Beirut Alive Association in the national capital on Sunday raised a total of 26,852 Lebanese flags breaking New York’s Waterloo record of 25,599 flags, Xinhua reported.

“I came here to adjudicate the record title for the most national flags displayed in one city in 24 hours. I am here to make sure that all guidelines of Guinness World Record have been achieved and and we have a new record title here which is the 26,852 flags achieved by Beirut Alive Association,” Guinness World Records’ Arbitrator Ahmed Jabr told Xinhua.

Lebanon
The Beirut Alive Association in the national capital on Sunday raised a total of 26,852 Lebanese flags breaking New York’s Waterloo record of 25,599 flags, Xinhua reported. Pixabay

The event was organised under the patronage of Prime Minister Saad Hariri, represented by MP Rola Tabsh, at the Nejmeh Square in downtown Beirut, in the presence of Economic and Social Council Member Mohammed Al-Jouzou and independent witnesses from “Al-Ittihad Law firms” and various prominent figures.

flag
I am here to make sure that all guidelines of Guinness World Record have been achieved and and we have a new record title here which is the 26,852 flags achieved by Beirut Alive Association,” Guinness World Records’ Arbitrator Ahmed Jabr told Xinhua. Pixabay

Also Read: Removing Screen-Time Limiting Apps, Apple Defends its Decision

After raising the flag that broke the world record, MP Tabsh congratulated the Beirut Alive Association for this remarkable individual and national initiative by excellence, adorning Beirut with thousands of Lebanese flags and entering the Book of Guinness.

“Today they were capable of raising thousands of Lebanese flags to enter the Guinness book. This is a national initiative which reflects Beirut’s role and which implicates no flag other than the Lebanese will be raised in Beirut,” Tabsh said. (IANS)

Next Story

Here’s how Smaller Class Sizes Affect Students’ Performance

Smaller class sizes not always better for students

0
Smaller class
Smaller Class sizes can have a negative impact on students' achievement and performance. Pixabay

Researchers have found that smaller class sizes are not always associated with better pupil performance and achievement.

“This finding is perhaps due to the fact that class size effects are more likely to be detected in countries with limited school resources where teacher quality is lower on average,” said study researcher Spyros Konstantopoulos from Michigan State University in the US.

The precise effect of smaller class sizes can vary between countries, academic subjects, years, and different cognitive and non-cognitive skills, with many other factors likely playing a role, according to the study published in the journal Research Papers in Education.

Smaller class sizes in schools are generally seen as highly desirable, especially by parents. With smaller class sizes, teachers can more easily maintain control and give more attention to each pupil.

Smaller class room size
The precise effect of smaller class sizes can vary between countries, academic subjects, years, and different cognitive and non-cognitive skills. Pixabay

As such, many countries limit the maximum size of a class, often at around 30 pupils.

for the findings, the researchers decided to analyse data produced by the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS).

Every four years since 1995, TIMSS has monitored the performance and achievement of fourth grade (age 9-10) and eighth grade (age 13-14) pupils from around 50 countries in mathematics and science.

It records pupils’ academic ability in these subjects and their self-reported attitude and interest in them, and also contains information on class sizes.

To make the analysis more manageable, the researchers limited it to data from eighth grade pupils in four European countries – Hungary, Lithuania, Romania and Slovenia – collected in 2003, 2007 and 2011.

They chose these four countries because they all mandate maximum class sizes, which would help to make the statistical analysis more reliable.

Despite these limitations, the data still encompassed 4,277 pupils from 231 classes in 151 schools, making it much larger than most previous studies on class size.

The analysis revealed that smaller class sizes were associated with benefits in Romania and Lithuania, but not in Hungary and Slovenia.

Smaller class sizes
Smaller class sizes in schools are generally seen as highly desirable, especially by parents. Pixabay

The beneficial effects were most marked in Romania, where smaller classes were associated with greater academic achievement in mathematics, physics, chemistry and earth science, as well as greater enjoyment of learning mathematics.

In Lithuania, however, smaller class sizes were mainly associated with improvements in non-cognitive skills such as greater enjoyment in learning biology and chemistry, rather than higher academic achievement in these subjects.

The beneficial effects were also only seen in certain years.

“Most class size effects were not different than zero, which suggests that reducing class size does not automatically guarantee improvements in student performance,” said Konstantopoulos.

“Many other classroom processes and dynamics factor in and have to work well together to achieve successful outcomes in student learning,” Konstantopoulos said.

Also Read- E-Commerce Sites Ride the Year-End Fashion Sales Wave

The researchers think smaller class sizes may have had greater beneficial effects on pupils in Romania and Lithuania than in Hungary and Slovenia because schools in Romania and Lithuania have fewer resources. (IANS)