Wednesday March 27, 2019

New Test To Predict Early Tumour In Children

While proactive treatment plans are still years away in the future, this study is the first step toward a personalised standard of care for childhood cancer patients.

0
//
cancer
Key gene behind breast cancer identified. Pixabay

Researchers have used a new test for analysing paediatric tumours that may one day guide personalised treatment for children with cancer, according to new research.

The new technology can provide results for up to 16 patients in a week.

The study showed that by analysing 28 childhood tumour samples from nine cancer types, the paediatric cancer-focused test found more genetic mutations per sample compared with tests used to examine adult cancers.

In addition, it better identified weaknesses that can potentially be targeted with drugs.

CANCER
technology could be used in a more proactive way to study the child’s cancer early and prepare for a disease relapse prior to its occurrence

“Paediatric cancers are often very aggressive, so doing these types of tests need to be very fast. Using targeted sequencing allows for a fast turnaround time and a simple workflow. It has a lot of potential to inform better treatment options for paediatric patients,” said lead author Amanda Lorentzian, graduate student at the University of British Columbia in Canada.

“This test uses DNA sequencing technology to look at thousands of specific regions in the tumour’s genome and identify changes or mutations in those areas,” said Chris Maxwell, associate professor at the varsity.

Currently, most children diagnosed with cancer receive treatment and survive. For many cancer types there is greater than an 80 per cent cure rate, but the possibility of relapse is always looming.

Cancer
Most children diagnosed with cancer receive treatment and survive

Because cure rates drop dramatically for children that suffer a cancer relapse, this new technology may identify more targeted treatments, hopes Philipp Lange, assistant professor at the varsity.

In addition, this technology could be used in a more proactive way to study the child’s cancer early and prepare for a disease relapse prior to its occurrence, said the team.

Also Read: Risk Of Suicide Quadruples With Cancer: Study

While proactive treatment plans are still years away in the future, this study is the first step toward a personalised standard of care for childhood cancer patients.

Similar tests have been designed for adult cancers, however, childhood cancers require a unique approach since different tissues are affected and fewer drugs are safe for treating children. (IANS)

Next Story

Researchers Discover Balance of Two Enzymes That May Help Treat Pancreatic Cancer

While still in the earliest stages, Newton hoped this information might one day aid pancreatic diagnostics and treatment

0
Cancer
Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

A new research has set the stage for clinicians to potentially use levels of a pancreatic cancer patient’s PHLPP1 and PKC enzymes as a prognostic and for researchers to develop new therapeutic drugs that change the balance of the two enzymes as a means to treat the disease.

The study, published on Wednesday in Molecular Cell, was led by Alexandra Newton, professor in the Department of Pharmacology at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, and Timothy Baffi, a graduate student in her lab, Xinhua news agency reported.

The new study built on the team’s work in 2015 that found the enzyme PKC, which was believed in previous studies to promote tumour growth, actually suppressed it.

The latest study took the investigation a step further by uncovering how cells regulate PKC activity and discovered that any time an over-active PKC is inadvertently produced, the PHLPP1 “proofreader” tags it for destruction.

Cancer patient
Cancer patient.

“That means the amount of PHLPP1 in your cells determines your amount of PKC,” Newton said. “And it turns out those enzyme levels are especially important in pancreatic cancer.”

The team observed 105 pancreatic cancer tumours to analyze the enzyme levels in each one. About 50 per cent of patients with low PHLPP1/high PKC lived longer than five-and-a-half years.

Also Read- A Brain Circuit Can Help Reverse Craving for Liquor, Says Study

While still in the earliest stages, Newton hoped this information might one day aid pancreatic diagnostics and treatment.

Pancreatic cancer is caused by the abnormal and uncontrolled growth of cells in the pancreas, a large gland in the digestive system. It typically doesn’t show symptoms in the early stages. Sufferers tend to develop signs, such as back pain and jaundice, when it has spread to other organs. (IANS)