Wednesday July 17, 2019

New Test To Predict Early Tumour In Children

While proactive treatment plans are still years away in the future, this study is the first step toward a personalised standard of care for childhood cancer patients.

0
//
cancer
Key gene behind breast cancer identified. Pixabay

Researchers have used a new test for analysing paediatric tumours that may one day guide personalised treatment for children with cancer, according to new research.

The new technology can provide results for up to 16 patients in a week.

The study showed that by analysing 28 childhood tumour samples from nine cancer types, the paediatric cancer-focused test found more genetic mutations per sample compared with tests used to examine adult cancers.

In addition, it better identified weaknesses that can potentially be targeted with drugs.

CANCER
technology could be used in a more proactive way to study the child’s cancer early and prepare for a disease relapse prior to its occurrence

“Paediatric cancers are often very aggressive, so doing these types of tests need to be very fast. Using targeted sequencing allows for a fast turnaround time and a simple workflow. It has a lot of potential to inform better treatment options for paediatric patients,” said lead author Amanda Lorentzian, graduate student at the University of British Columbia in Canada.

“This test uses DNA sequencing technology to look at thousands of specific regions in the tumour’s genome and identify changes or mutations in those areas,” said Chris Maxwell, associate professor at the varsity.

Currently, most children diagnosed with cancer receive treatment and survive. For many cancer types there is greater than an 80 per cent cure rate, but the possibility of relapse is always looming.

Cancer
Most children diagnosed with cancer receive treatment and survive

Because cure rates drop dramatically for children that suffer a cancer relapse, this new technology may identify more targeted treatments, hopes Philipp Lange, assistant professor at the varsity.

In addition, this technology could be used in a more proactive way to study the child’s cancer early and prepare for a disease relapse prior to its occurrence, said the team.

Also Read: Risk Of Suicide Quadruples With Cancer: Study

While proactive treatment plans are still years away in the future, this study is the first step toward a personalised standard of care for childhood cancer patients.

Similar tests have been designed for adult cancers, however, childhood cancers require a unique approach since different tissues are affected and fewer drugs are safe for treating children. (IANS)

Next Story

Researchers: Video Games can Help Children Evaluate, Express and Manage Emotions

Emotional intelligence can be better explained when there are emotions involved from both sides

0
Video games, Children, Emotions
Video games may improve the expression of emotions, but awareness and coping strategies can't be solely understood by games. PIxabay

While it’s commonly believed that video games are harmful for children, researchers have found that it can help them evaluate, express and manage emotions when used as part of an emotional intelligence training programme.

“Video games may improve the expression of emotions, but awareness and coping strategies can’t be solely understood by games. Emotional intelligence can be better explained when there are emotions involved from both sides,” Manish Jain, Consultant at BLK Super Speciality Hospital, Delhi, told IANS.

According to the study published in the Games for Health Journal, researchers from the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Italy developed an emotional intelligence training programme that integrated video games as experience-based learning tools.

The researchers created EmotivaMente, a video game, to enhance emotional intelligence among adolescents, perhaps the group that could benefit the most. They analysed 121 adolescents who participated in eight sessions.

Video games, Children, Emotions
While it’s commonly believed that video games are harmful for children, researchers have found that it can help them evaluate. Pixabay

“Games for health have been designed to address an increasing variety of issues. A relatively new health issue is emotional intelligence, which has implications for various health problems, including coping with stress,” said Tom Baranowski, Professor at the Baylor College of Medicine in the US.

The preliminary evaluation indicated that video games enhanced the students’ evaluation and expression of emotions.

But some experts believe outdoor activities should be given more importance to develop emotional intelligence, which includes awareness of emotions, managing emotions effectively and maintaining relationships, in children.

“In the modern day where interaction is increasingly becoming online and more time is spent indoors, the right way to build emotional intelligence is people-to-people interactions and connecting, spending quality time with peers and family, learning through experiences and feedback,” Samir Parikh, Consultant Psychiatrist and Director at Fortis Mental Health Programme in Delhi, told IANS.

Also Read- UNAIDS: 16 Per Cent Decline in HIV Cases Since 2010, Driven Mostly by Steady Progress

“Video games are not the most prudent way to enhance emotional skills. Young people should have a well-balanced life with adequate outdoor activities and investment of time and energy in building relationships by working on communication and person-to-person connect,” Parikh said.

Sagar Lavania, Head of Department, Psychiatry and Mental Health, Nayati Medicity, Mathura, believes “human and one-on-one interactions are ideal ways to increase emotional intelligence, especially among adolescents, and can never be substituted by alternative methods”.

“However, if newer techniques are coming up, it needs to be thoroughly researched and supervised, keeping in mind the vulnerability of teenagers,” he remarked. (IANS)