Tuesday November 12, 2019

New Test To Predict Early Tumour In Children

While proactive treatment plans are still years away in the future, this study is the first step toward a personalised standard of care for childhood cancer patients.

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cancer
Key gene behind breast cancer identified. Pixabay

Researchers have used a new test for analysing paediatric tumours that may one day guide personalised treatment for children with cancer, according to new research.

The new technology can provide results for up to 16 patients in a week.

The study showed that by analysing 28 childhood tumour samples from nine cancer types, the paediatric cancer-focused test found more genetic mutations per sample compared with tests used to examine adult cancers.

In addition, it better identified weaknesses that can potentially be targeted with drugs.

CANCER
technology could be used in a more proactive way to study the child’s cancer early and prepare for a disease relapse prior to its occurrence

“Paediatric cancers are often very aggressive, so doing these types of tests need to be very fast. Using targeted sequencing allows for a fast turnaround time and a simple workflow. It has a lot of potential to inform better treatment options for paediatric patients,” said lead author Amanda Lorentzian, graduate student at the University of British Columbia in Canada.

“This test uses DNA sequencing technology to look at thousands of specific regions in the tumour’s genome and identify changes or mutations in those areas,” said Chris Maxwell, associate professor at the varsity.

Currently, most children diagnosed with cancer receive treatment and survive. For many cancer types there is greater than an 80 per cent cure rate, but the possibility of relapse is always looming.

Cancer
Most children diagnosed with cancer receive treatment and survive

Because cure rates drop dramatically for children that suffer a cancer relapse, this new technology may identify more targeted treatments, hopes Philipp Lange, assistant professor at the varsity.

In addition, this technology could be used in a more proactive way to study the child’s cancer early and prepare for a disease relapse prior to its occurrence, said the team.

Also Read: Risk Of Suicide Quadruples With Cancer: Study

While proactive treatment plans are still years away in the future, this study is the first step toward a personalised standard of care for childhood cancer patients.

Similar tests have been designed for adult cancers, however, childhood cancers require a unique approach since different tissues are affected and fewer drugs are safe for treating children. (IANS)

Next Story

Impaired Liver Function During Pregnancy Leads To Obese Kids

Impaired liver function during pregnancy increases the risks of obesity in kids

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Pregnancy
Impaired liver function during pregnancy may increase the risk of obesity in children. PIxabay

Impaired liver function during pregnancy may alter gut bacteria composition and increase the risk of obesity in children, according to a new study.

In a rodent of model of the most common liver disease in pregnancy, the composition of gut bacteria in offspring was altered and liver function impaired, particularly when they were fed a Western-style, high-fat diet.

“These findings further suggest that health during pregnancy can have long-term effects on children. In this case they suggest that gut microbiome alterations, may increase the risk of obesity in children, when fed a western style, high-fat diet, ” said study researcher Caroline Ovadia from King’s College London.

The most common liver disease in pregnancy, intrahepatic cholestasis (ICP), reduces the release of digestive fluid bile from the liver causing bile acids to build up in the blood, impairing liver function. This causes severe itching in the mother and increases risks of stillbirth and preterm birth for the baby.

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In a rodent of model of the most common liver disease in pregnancy, the composition of gut bacteria in offspring was altered and liver function impaired. Pixabay

Previous studies suggest that children of women with ICP are more likely to develop childhood obesity.

For the findings, the research team investigated how gut microbiota are affected in the offspring of a mouse model of ICP.

The results reported that the offspring had a different gut microbiome composition and liver function, particularly when fed a high-fat diet, which could contribute to impaired metabolism and increase risk of obesity.

The results suggest that mice born to mothers with ICP, or other liver diseases, may benefit from maintaining a healthy diet and should avoid fatty foods.

These findings also suggest that targeting microbiome composition with treatment strategies in pregnant women, such as using pre-biotics or pro-biotics, could help prevent the risk of child obesity.

Also Read- Parents With Only Child More Likely To Tackle Obese Kids

“Understanding changes in composition of the gut microbiome and their effects may provide new ways of diagnosing patients at particular risk of obesity before it occurs. We could then develop personalised medicine and target appropriate treatments to alter gut bacteria accordingly,” Ovadia added.

The study was presented at The Society for Endocrinology Annual Conference in the UK. (IANS)