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New Zealand: Indian-origin man fights robbers

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Wellington: An Indian-origin man fought with two robbers who stole his cash register in Christchurch, the largest city in the South Island of New Zealand.

Kamlesh Patel, a dairy owner, said two men entered his Opawa Universal Dairy and tried to flee with the cash register at about 7.40 PM.

He chased down the men and caught one and held him captive until the police arrived.

The second man involved in the attempted robbery managed to escape after his partner was caught.

“They ran away with the cash register. I started chasing him. He dropped the cash register and I caught him,” Patel was quoted as saying.

“[The cash register] was too heavy for them. It’s too heavy for me,” he added.

Patel was at the dairy with several friends and family members. The group held on to the offender until the police arrived a short time later.

Five years ago, a man demanding cash and tobacco robbed Patel at gunpoint. Patel tried and stopped the offender that time too, and received minor head injuries as he tried to wrestle the rifle from the offender.

Patel said he did not believe the men involved in the attempted robbery were armed.

Patel said that no one was hurt during the incident.

“Shoplifters keep coming, but this is different,” he was quoted as saying.(IANS)

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After Being Stranded, 145 Pilot Whales Die In New Zealand

Marine mammals are frequently stranded on New Zealand's coasts and the average number of operations carried out by environmental officials is about 85 per year

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Pilot whales
Pilot whales. Flickr

About 145 pilot whales died in New Zealand after being stranded during the weekend on Stewart Island in the extreme south of the country, officials said on Monday.

A hiker alerted authorities on Saturday night about the situation of the whales, who were stranded in Mason Bay in two separate groups about two kilometers apart, a Department of Conservation of New Zealand release said.

Pilot whales
Almost 150 whales die in mass stranding. BBC

Half of the whales were dead when rescuers arrived and the condition of the rest, by the time they were found, was so bad it was decided to euthanise them, said Ren Leppens, operations manager at Rakiura.

“Sadly, the likelihood of being able to successfully re-float the remaining whales was extremely low. The remote location, lack of nearby personnel and the whales’ deteriorating condition meant the most humane thing to do was to euthanise,” said Leppens.

Pilot whales
A volunteer looks after a whale, part of a pod of stranded pilot whales.

Pilot whales, also called long-finned pilot whale, are a specimen with a bulging forehead and a robust body that can reach between six and seven meters in length, Xinhua news agency reported.

Also Read: The Ocean And Its Climate Crisis

Marine mammals are frequently stranded on New Zealand’s coasts and the average number of operations carried out by environmental officials is about 85 per year, most of them to save these animals individually.

The reasons why whales and dolphins can become stranded have not been clarified, although it is attributed to diseases, navigation errors, sudden changes in tides, being chased by predators or extreme weather conditions. (IANS)