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New Zealand: Indian-origin man fights robbers

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Wellington: An Indian-origin man fought with two robbers who stole his cash register in Christchurch, the largest city in the South Island of New Zealand.

Kamlesh Patel, a dairy owner, said two men entered his Opawa Universal Dairy and tried to flee with the cash register at about 7.40 PM.

He chased down the men and caught one and held him captive until the police arrived.

The second man involved in the attempted robbery managed to escape after his partner was caught.

“They ran away with the cash register. I started chasing him. He dropped the cash register and I caught him,” Patel was quoted as saying.

“[The cash register] was too heavy for them. It’s too heavy for me,” he added.

Patel was at the dairy with several friends and family members. The group held on to the offender until the police arrived a short time later.

Five years ago, a man demanding cash and tobacco robbed Patel at gunpoint. Patel tried and stopped the offender that time too, and received minor head injuries as he tried to wrestle the rifle from the offender.

Patel said he did not believe the men involved in the attempted robbery were armed.

Patel said that no one was hurt during the incident.

“Shoplifters keep coming, but this is different,” he was quoted as saying.(IANS)

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Scientists Produce Complex Glass From 3D Printing

The researchers can change various parameters in each layer, including pore size.

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3D printing or additive manufacturing
3D printing or additive manufacturing is a process of making three dimensional solid objects from a digital file. Pixabay

Creating glass objects using 3D printing is not easy but a groups of researchers including one of Indian-origin has now used a better technique to produce complex glass objects with addictive manufacturing.

Researchers from ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich) used the method based on stereolithography, one of the first 3D printing techniques developed during the 1980s.

David Moore, Lorenzo Barbera and Kunal Masania in the Complex Materials group led by ETH processor Andre Studart developed a special resin that contains a plastic and organic molecules to which glass precursors are bonded.

The resin can be processed using commercially available ‘Digital Light Processing’ technology.

This involves irradiating the resin with UV light patterns. Wherever the light strikes the resin, it hardens because the light sensitive components of the polymer resin cross link at the exposed points.

3D Printing of molecules in hand
This image shows molecules in hand. The molecular model appears on the computer screen, tumbling and turning in real time as the person holding the object manipulates it. Pixabay

The plastic monomers combine to form a labyrinth like structure, creating the polymer. The ceramic-bearing molecules fill the interstices of this labyrinth, said the team in a paper published in the journal Natural Materials.

An object can thus be built up layer by layer. The researchers can change various parameters in each layer, including pore size.

“We discovered that by accident, but we can use this to directly influence the pore size of the printed object,” said Masania.

These 3D-printed glass objects are still no bigger than a die. Large glass objects, such as bottles, drinking glasses or window panes, cannot be produced in this way “which was not actually the goal of the project,” emphasised Masania.

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The aim was rather to prove the feasibility of producing glass objects of complex geometry using a 3D printing process. However, the new technology is not just a gimmick.

The researchers applied for a patent and are currently negotiating with a major Swiss glassware dealer who wants to use the technology in his company. (IANS)

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New Zealand Passes Zero Carbon Bill Aimed at Combating Climate Change

We in New Zealand are on the right side of history, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said in a speech at Parliament

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New Zealand, Carbon, Bill
Today we have made a choice that will leave a legacy. Pixabay

New Zealand on Thursday passed a bill to reduce its carbon emissions to zero by 2050 and meet its commitments under the Paris climate accord.

“I am really proud to stand in this House today for what is a historic moment… Today we have made a choice that will leave a legacy… We in New Zealand are on the right side of history,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said in a speech at Parliament.

The law commits New Zealand to keeping global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius, as stipulated by the Paris Agreement and marks an important step in the fight against the climate emergency looming over the world according to more than 11,000 scientists worldwide, reports Efe news.

“We’ve led the world before in nuclear free and votes for women, now we are leading again,” Climate Change Minister James Shaw tweeted.

New Zealand, Carbon, Bill
The zero emissions target excludes methane emissions but the law pledges to reduce them gradually. Pixabay

The zero emissions target excludes methane emissions but the law pledges to reduce them gradually.

The law includes the establishment of a green investment fund worth NZ$100 million ($64 million), a carbon trading scheme and inclusion of agriculture in emissions pricing by 2025, and the plantation of one billion trees by 2028, according to a statement by the Ministry of Climate Change.

The law also stipulates suspending the release of new permits for hydrocarbon explorations at sea and supports the production of cheaper electric vehicles apart from setting a goal of 100 per cent renewable electricity generation by 2035.

The legislation aims to cut biological methane emissions from agriculture by 10 per cent until 2030, and targets 24-47 per cent reduction in emissions by 2050.

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Simon Bridges, leader of the opposition and the New Zealand National Party, said that his party supported the bill but would keep trying to introduce changes in the future in order to make it better. (IANS)

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New Zealand To Decriminalize Abortion Through Reform Bill

Abortion to be considered a health issue and not a crime, proposed in new reform bill in New Zealand

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Abortion decriminalised in new zealand
Abortion is a crime in New Zealand till now and the government is working to scrape that law. Pixabay

The New Zealand government on Monday announced a bill to decriminalize abortion so that it can be treated as a health issue, rather than a crime.

The reform bill proposes removing any statutory medical exam for women not more than 20 weeks into their pregnancy and includes the setting up of “safe areas” near abortion facilities to prevent women from being harassed or attacked, Efe news quoted Justice Minister Andrew Little as saying in a statement.

“Safe abortion should be treated and regulated as a health issue; a woman has the right to choose what happens to her body,” Little said.

“Abortion is the only medical procedure that is still a crime in New Zealand. It’s time for this to change.”

New Zealand announces bill to decriminalize abortion
A new bill proposes to decriminalize abortion in New Zealand. Pixabay

The bill, which will have its first reading in the New Zealand parliament on Thursday, also requires a health practitioner to authorize women who are more than 20 weeks pregnant to terminate the pregnancy if it poses a risk to their mental and physical health as well as their wellbeing.

Also Read: 40-Year-Old Woman Suffering from Breast Cancer Delivers Baby through IVF Method

It also proposes that doctors opposed to providing abortion services on the grounds of conscience must inform pregnant women, who may seek services elsewhere, as well as that women be able to self-refer to a service provider, and health practitioners will advise women of counselling services available.

Currently, abortion is considered a crime in New Zealand, although women can terminate their pregnancies if two doctors consider it advisable for physical and mental health reasons. (IANS)