Saturday February 24, 2018

Next big step in the medicine world: Mini human heart developed in a lab by an Indian -origin scientist

0
//
22
Republish
Reprint

microscope-275984_640

By Newsgram Staff Writers

Human heart has been replicated under laboratory environment by Anurag Mathur, an Indian-origin scientist with the University of California at Berkeley. This will help researchers predict if a certain kind of medicine will adversely affect the human body or how much dosage of a drug is required.

“Many times doctors and researchers fail to predict a response to a certain drug or medicine because of the inaccuracy of the models used, like mice, that don’t have the same reactions as human tissue.” Mathur was quoted by Xinhua.

The mini-heart is created with human-induced Pluripotent stem cells that can form many different types of tissues. A special silicon microchip in the mini heart makes these tissues mimic blood vessels.

The researchers are calling this the next big step in the medicine world. With this kind of development medicine can become completely personalized. The doctors will just require a sample from the patient and he/she will be able to have his or her heart modeled in a lab with all the tests done.

“Doctors will be able to predict how certain drugs react on specific patients, thus preventing many illnesses and loss of valuable time,” a hopeful Anurag Mathur said.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Heart Attack Symptoms In Women Often Misinterpreted

The research paper, published in the journal Circulation, examined the relationship between gender, symptoms, perception of symptoms, and care-seeking among patients

0
//
17
heart attack
Women were also more likely to perceive their symptoms as stress or anxiety, and were more likely than men to report that their healthcare providers did not think that their symptoms were heart-related. Pexels

Young women who report heart attack symptoms such as indigestion, shortness of breath, palpitations or pain in the jaw, neck, or arms, were more likely than men to have them dismissed by their doctors as not heart related, raising their risk of death than similarly aged men, finds a new study.

Previous studies have reported that women were less likely to present with chest pain for acute myocardial infarction — commonly known as a heart attack — but more likely to report a wider variety of symptoms and also more likely to die in a hospital from the disease.

“When young women with multiple risk factors visit their doctor with any chest discomfort or other symptoms that may be associated with ischemic heart disease”, doctors should treat them appropriately, said Gail D’Onofrio from the Yale School of Public Health (YSPH).

ALSO READ: 4 Ways to Beat the Risk of Heart Attack in your 30s

The research paper, published in the journal Circulation, examined the relationship between gender, symptoms, perception of symptoms, and care-seeking among patients (2,009 women and 976 men) who were 55 years and younger and were hospitalized for heart attack.

heart attack
The analysis showed that the majority of both men and women reported chest pain, pressure, tightness, or discomfort as their main heart attack symptoms. Pexels

 

Yet, women were more likely than men to report other associated symptoms of heart attack, such as indigestion, shortness of breath, palpitations or pain in the jaw, neck, or arms.

ALSO READ: Memory of a heart attack gets stored in genes through epigenetic changes

Women were also more likely to perceive their symptoms as stress or anxiety, and were more likely than men to report that their healthcare providers did not think that their symptoms were heart-related, the researchers said.

“Although chest pain was the most common symptom for young women and men, the presentation of chest pain within the context of multiple symptoms may influence the prompt recognition of heart disease for these young patients,” said Judith H. Lichtman, associate professor at the YSPH. (IANS)

Next Story