Wednesday September 19, 2018

Next big step in the medicine world: Mini human heart developed in a lab by an Indian -origin scientist

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By Newsgram Staff Writers

Human heart has been replicated under laboratory environment by Anurag Mathur, an Indian-origin scientist with the University of California at Berkeley. This will help researchers predict if a certain kind of medicine will adversely affect the human body or how much dosage of a drug is required.

“Many times doctors and researchers fail to predict a response to a certain drug or medicine because of the inaccuracy of the models used, like mice, that don’t have the same reactions as human tissue.” Mathur was quoted by Xinhua.

The mini-heart is created with human-induced Pluripotent stem cells that can form many different types of tissues. A special silicon microchip in the mini heart makes these tissues mimic blood vessels.

The researchers are calling this the next big step in the medicine world. With this kind of development medicine can become completely personalized. The doctors will just require a sample from the patient and he/she will be able to have his or her heart modeled in a lab with all the tests done.

“Doctors will be able to predict how certain drugs react on specific patients, thus preventing many illnesses and loss of valuable time,” a hopeful Anurag Mathur said.

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Air Pollution Linked to Changes in Heart Structure

Higher exposures to the pollutants were linked to more significant changes in the structure of the heart, the findings showed

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Air Pollution.
Air pollution may lead to changes in heart structure. Pixabay

Researchers have found that people exposed to even low levels of air pollution can have changes in the structure of the heart, similar to those seen in the early stages of heart failure.

For every one extra microgram per cubic metre of PM2.5 — small particles of air pollution — and for every 10 extra microgram per cubic metre of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), the heart enlarges by approximately 1 per cent, showed the findings of the Britain-based study published in the journal Circulation.

“Although our study was observational and hasn’t yet shown a causal link, we saw significant changes in the heart, even at relatively low levels of air pollution exposure,” said one of the researchers Nay Aung from Queen Mary University of London.

For the study, the researchers looked at data from around 4,000 participants in the UK Biobank study, where volunteers provided a range of personal information, including their lifestyles, health record and details on where they have lived.

Higher exposures to the pollutants were linked to more significant changes in the structure of the heart,
Higher exposures to the pollutants were linked to more significant changes in the structure of the heart. Pixabay

Participants also had blood tests and health scans, and heart MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) was used to measure the size, weight and function of the participants’ hearts at fixed times.

The team found a clear association between those who lived near loud, busy roads, and were exposed to nitrogen dioxide or PM2.5 and the development of larger right and left ventricles in the heart.

Also Read: Air Pollution Linked to 3.2 Million New Diabetes Cases in One Year

The ventricles are important pumping chambers in the heart and, although these participants were healthy and had no symptoms, similar heart remodelling is seen in the early stages of heart failure.

Higher exposures to the pollutants were linked to more significant changes in the structure of the heart, the findings showed. (IANS)

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