Friday February 22, 2019

Next big step in the medicine world: Mini human heart developed in a lab by an Indian -origin scientist

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By Newsgram Staff Writers

Human heart has been replicated under laboratory environment by Anurag Mathur, an Indian-origin scientist with the University of California at Berkeley. This will help researchers predict if a certain kind of medicine will adversely affect the human body or how much dosage of a drug is required.

“Many times doctors and researchers fail to predict a response to a certain drug or medicine because of the inaccuracy of the models used, like mice, that don’t have the same reactions as human tissue.” Mathur was quoted by Xinhua.

The mini-heart is created with human-induced Pluripotent stem cells that can form many different types of tissues. A special silicon microchip in the mini heart makes these tissues mimic blood vessels.

The researchers are calling this the next big step in the medicine world. With this kind of development medicine can become completely personalized. The doctors will just require a sample from the patient and he/she will be able to have his or her heart modeled in a lab with all the tests done.

“Doctors will be able to predict how certain drugs react on specific patients, thus preventing many illnesses and loss of valuable time,” a hopeful Anurag Mathur said.

Next Story

Almost Half Of U.S. Adults Suffer From Heart Or Blood Vessel Disease: Report

Heart and blood vessel disease is linked to 1 of every 3 deaths in the United States and kills more Americans than all forms of cancer and respiratory diseases like pneumonia combined.

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A monitor shows a three-dimensional image of a human heart at the Klaus-Tschira-Institute for Integrative Computational Cardiology, department of the Heidelberg University Hospital, in Heidelberg, Germany, Aug. 14, 2018. VOA

A new report estimates that nearly half of all U.S. adults have some form of heart or blood vessel disease, a medical milestone that’s mostly due to recent guidelines that expanded how many people have high blood pressure.

The American Heart Association said Thursday that more than 121 million adults had cardiovascular disease in 2016. Taking out those with only high blood pressure leaves 24 million, or 9 percent of adults, who have other forms of disease such as heart failure or clogged arteries.

Measuring the burden of diseases shows areas that need to improve, the heart association’s chief science and medical officer, Dr. Mariell Jessup, said in a statement.

Traditional pacemakers use leads with electrodes on one end that are threaded through blood vessels to connect to the heart.
Traditional pacemakers use leads with electrodes on one end that are threaded through blood vessels to connect to the heart. Wikimedia Commons

High blood pressure, which had long been defined as a top reading of at least 140 or a bottom one of 90, dropped to 130 over 80 under guidelines adopted in 2017. It raises the risk for heart attacks, strokes and many other problems, and only about half of those with the condition have it under control.

Being diagnosed with high blood pressure doesn’t necessarily mean you need medication right away; the first step is aiming for a healthier lifestyle, even for those who are prescribed medicine. Poor diets, lack of exercise and other bad habits cause 90 percent of high blood pressure.

Pregnancy, Breast Cancer
High blood pressure, which had long been defined as a top reading of at least 140 or a bottom one of 90, dropped to 130 over 80 under guidelines adopted in 2017.

The report is an annual statistics update by the heart association, the National Institutes of Health and others.

Other highlights:

  • Heart and blood vessel disease is linked to 1 of every 3 deaths in the United States and kills more Americans than all forms of cancer and respiratory diseases like pneumonia combined.
  • Certain groups have higher rates than others; 57 percent of black women and 60 percent of black males.

Also Read: Injecting Drugs May up Bacterial Heart Infections: Study

  • Coronary heart disease, or clogged or hardened arteries, caused 43 percent of cardiovascular deaths in the U.S., followed by stroke (17 percent), high blood pressure (10 percent) and heart failure (9 percent). (VOA)