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Nitish Kumar: Bihar’s son in a tete-a-tete on twitter

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Bihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar (Photo: IANS)
Bihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar (Photo: IANS)

By Sreyashi Mazumdar

With arch rivals contending to establish their feet in Bihar, social media platforms have become an easy bait for both Nitish Kumar and Narendra Modi to unravel their plans for the state and their persistent digs at each other. Narendra Modi being a cock-a-hoop political twitterati has managed to scoop the best out of the social media platform till this date; whereas, the vanguard of Bihar Asmita, Nitish Kumar, is still lagging behind with less than 60,000 followers in his pocket.

However, debunking his lacklustre twitter account, Nitish Kumar is all game for the real battle to begin. Toeing on the lines of his adversary, the JD(U) leader had a tete-a-tete with journalists across the board on twitter yesterday.

While scrolling through the string of tweets thronging the leader’s account one might get an inkling of his intent of getting back at Narendra Modi for his DNA jibe. Moreover, it seems that leader is full of vengeance and the assembly election triumph might render him the coveted solace.

Important issues discussed in the  Twitter tete-a-tete
 

 

– DNA jibe

  .@NitishKumar मोदी जी ने निजी आरोप लगाए थे आप पर. आप उसे बिहार की अस्मिता से क्यों जोड़ रहे हैं. pic.twitter.com/bJXgRPnD4U — BBC Hindi (@BBCHindi) August 5, 2015

 

– Bihar special status

 

 

– BJP Vs RJD-JD(U)

 

 

– Jitan Ram Manjhi

 

Development in Bihar

 

— Nitish Kumar (@NitishKumar) August 5, 2015

.@bhupendrachaube The facts & figures don’t support your statement as our performance improved during the second term and has been eventful — Nitish Kumar (@NitishKumar) August 5, 2015    

Mango Man’s Report Card

 

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Twitter Gets Investigated By Ireland Over Data Collection

Both Facebook and Twitter have faced lawsuits for collecting data on links shared in private messages

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 Twitter is reportedly facing an investigation by privacy regulators in Ireland over data collection in its link-shortening system, the media reported.

Privacy regulators in Ireland have launched an investigation into exactly how much data Twitter collects from t.co, its URL-shortening system, The Verge reported late on Saturday.

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