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Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi rescues Nine Children from an Illegal Factory

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Mr. Kailash Satyarthi, Wikimedia
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New Delhi, May 18, 2017: Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi on Thursday rescued nine children from an illegal factory here where they were slaving away after being trafficked from Bihar.

Satyarthi and his NGO Bachpan Bachao Andolan (BBA) raided the premises in Old Delhi’s Daryaganj area and rescued the children aged between seven and 15 years, the activist told IANS.

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All the children were from Katihar in Bihar, were confined in two rooms and forced to produce Christmas gifts for the Western market.

“These children were working in a manufacturing unit producing shining Christmas decoration items,” Satyarthi said.

It was the second raid in which he personally took part since getting the Nobel prize in 2014.

He said the workshop was located in a narrow lane.

Satyarthi said he went there himself because the activist who had detected the bonded children had been identified by some locals.

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“I did not want to give him this responsibility to rescue the children as he could have been attacked,” he said. “I was once attacked in this area seven or eight years ago.”

But as Satyarthi landed there with his team, he himself got recognized as a Nobel prize winner.

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“In no time a large number of people gathered and began shaking hands with me. Everyone welcomed me. And we easily rescued the children as our women activists entered the workshop and spotted the kids.”

The rescued children will be taken to a centre run by Satyarthi’s NGO for rehabilitation, he said. The workshop has been sealed and a police case has been filed against the absconding owner. (IANS)

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A lesson in the woods may boost kids’ learning

Moreover, the number of times the teacher had to redirect a student's attention to their work was roughly halved immediately after an outdoor lesson.

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Just sitting in classrooms makes children more dull. Wikimedia Commons
Just sitting in classrooms makes children more dull. Wikimedia Commons
  • To help students concentrate and learn more, teachers have found a new way of teaching them.
  • This technique of teaching outdoors will boost children’s mental capabilities to learn and remember.

Are your students unable to concentrate on their lessons in the classroom? Take them for outdoor learning sessions.

According to a study, a lesson in the lap of nature can significantly increase children’s attention level and boost their learning.

While adults exposed to parks, trees or wildlife have been known to experience benefits such as increased physical activity, stress reduction, rejuvenated attention and increased motivation, in children, even a view of greenery through a classroom window can have positive effects on their attention span, the researchers said.

The study showed that post an outdoor lesson, students were significantly more attentive and engaged with their schoolwork and were not overexcited or inattentive.

Taking students outside help them concentrate more. Wikimedia Commons
Taking students outside help them concentrate more. Wikimedia Commons

Moreover, the number of times the teacher had to redirect a student’s attention to their work was roughly halved immediately after an outdoor lesson.

“Our teachers were able to teach uninterrupted for almost twice as long at a time after the outdoor lesson and we saw the nature effect with our sceptical teacher as well,” said Ming Kuo, a scientist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the US.

For the study, published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, researchers tested their hypothesis in third graders (9-10 years old) in a school.

A few minutes outside help students concentrate better. VOA
A few minutes outside help students concentrate better. VOA

Over a 10-week period, an experienced teacher held one lesson a week outdoors and a similar lesson in her regular classroom and another, more sceptical teacher did the same. Their outdoor “classroom” was a grassy spot just outside the school, in view of a wooded area.

A previous research suggested that 15 minutes of self-paced exercise can also significantly improve a child’s mood, attention and memory. IANS