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Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi rescues Nine Children from an Illegal Factory

Mr. Kailash Satyarthi, Wikimedia

New Delhi, May 18, 2017: Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi on Thursday rescued nine children from an illegal factory here where they were slaving away after being trafficked from Bihar.

Satyarthi and his NGO Bachpan Bachao Andolan (BBA) raided the premises in Old Delhi’s Daryaganj area and rescued the children aged between seven and 15 years, the activist told IANS.

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All the children were from Katihar in Bihar, were confined in two rooms and forced to produce Christmas gifts for the Western market.

“These children were working in a manufacturing unit producing shining Christmas decoration items,” Satyarthi said.

It was the second raid in which he personally took part since getting the Nobel prize in 2014.

He said the workshop was located in a narrow lane.

Satyarthi said he went there himself because the activist who had detected the bonded children had been identified by some locals.

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“I did not want to give him this responsibility to rescue the children as he could have been attacked,” he said. “I was once attacked in this area seven or eight years ago.”

But as Satyarthi landed there with his team, he himself got recognized as a Nobel prize winner.

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“In no time a large number of people gathered and began shaking hands with me. Everyone welcomed me. And we easily rescued the children as our women activists entered the workshop and spotted the kids.”

The rescued children will be taken to a centre run by Satyarthi’s NGO for rehabilitation, he said. The workshop has been sealed and a police case has been filed against the absconding owner. (IANS)

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Having kids or not, life satisfaction remain same

Parents with or without children are just two sides of the same coin: non-parents are not 'failed' parents and parents are not 'failed' non-parents, says a study

spirit child
Having or not having kids doesn't affect life satisfaction. VOA

Parents with or without children are just two sides of the same coin: non-parents are not ‘failed’ parents and parents are not ‘failed’ non-parents, says a study.

According to researchers, factors such as higher educational attainment, higher income, better health and religiosity enhance life satisfaction and they found that parents and non-parents have similar levels of life satisfaction.

“It is simply a mistake to presume that people with children have better lives,” said Angus Deaton, the Dwight D. Eisenhower professor of economics and international affairs at Princeton University.

Having kids doesn’t increase life satisfaction. Twitter

“Some people like oranges, and some like apples, and we do not think that orange eaters should have better or worse lives than apple eaters,” he added.

However, adults with children at home experience more emotional highs and lows than those without children at home, said the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Researchers examined data from the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index – a survey of 1.8 million Americans who evaluated their lives and reported daily emotional experiences between 2008 and 2012. The researchers focused on the 34-46 age group.

They found that all emotions – happiness, smile, enjoyment, worry, stress and anger – were markedly higher among those who have children at home. “Life evaluation is not the same as experienced emotions, such as happiness, enjoyment, sadness, worry or stress,” said Deaton.

Also Read: New Toys Help Cultivate Emotional Intelligence in Children

“The results show that, no matter what else is taken into account, parents experience more of all of these than non-parents. There are good days and bad, ups and downs,” he added.

For countries like India, where there is strong social pressure to become parents, Deaton and Stone say their argument does not apply. In such countries, people may have children even when it does not increase their own life evaluation, though it may increase that of their parents or communities, said the study. “The evidence for those countries does indeed show that parents have lower life evaluations, on average,” the study said. IANS