Tuesday February 19, 2019
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Nobody should be president for life: Obama

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Addis Ababa: US President Barack Obama on Tuesday stressed that no president should remain in office for life, as it violates important constitutional provisions which in turn “risks instability and strife” as has happened in Burundi.

“Let me be honest with you, I do not understand this. I am in my second term, it’s been an extraordinary privilege for me to serve as president of the United States, I love my work, but under our constitution I cannot run again.

“I actually think I am a pretty good president, I think if I ran I could win,” Obama said in a speech at the headquarters of the African Union, which is hosting for the first time an active US president.

“Africa’s democratic progress is also at risk when leaders refuse to step aside when their terms end,” Obama added at the conclusion of his first official visit to Ethiopia.

“When a leader tries to change the rules in the middle of the game just to stay in office, it risks instability and strife, as we’ve seen in Burundi,” Obama said.

Obama was referring to his Burundian counterpart Pierre Nkurunziza, who has just been re-elected for a third presidential term, in violation of the constitutional two-term limit, which provoked a wave of violence that has claimed dozens of victims and forced more than 160,000 people to flee their homes.

“I don’t understand why people want to stay so long, especially when they’ve got a lot of money,” he jested, adding that when a leader acts like the only one capable of holding the nation together, it indicates failure.

“There is a lot that I like to do to keep America moving, but the law is the law, and no one person is above the law,” Obama added.

In fact, Obama said he was “looking for the life after being president… I can spend time with my family, I can find other ways to serve, I can visit Africa more often”.

Obama called on African leaders to draw inspiration from late former South African president Nelson Mandela who “forged a lasting legacy by being willing to leave office and transfer power peacefully”.

“Just as the African Union has condemned coups and illegitimate transfers of power, the AU’s authority and strong voice can also help the people of Africa ensure that their leaders abide by term limits and their constitutions,” Obama added, later clearly stating that “nobody should be president for life”.

(IANS)

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Thrill of 27th Annual Pan African Festival

One of the main goals of the festival is to create dialogue and education through film and the arts.

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Linus has used the power of the media to bring awareness to child marriage, which affects girls around the world. Pixabay

More than 100 artisans and 170 films from around the world are being showcased at the 27th Annual Pan African Film & Arts Festival in Los Angeles.

The multiday event in the largely African American neighborhood of Baldwin Hills aims to connect Africans to people of African descent from around the world.

“As a result of the slave trade and colonization, African people are spread all over the planet, so we get a chance through this festival, get a chance to know each other,” said the festival’s executive director, Ayuko Babu.

Film, fine art, fashion and jewelry with Africa as inspiration are all featured at the festival.

“I never think of us as African American. I think of us as Africans in America, and in coming from that perspective, the ancestral lineage of art and Africa is beyond belief,” said jewelry artist Henry Baba Osageyfo Colby of Timbuktu Art Colony.

FILE - Nigerian filmmaker and actress Stephanie Okereke Linus poses for a photograph during a ceremony to unveil her as the UNFPA Regional Ambassador for Maternal Health in West and Central Africa in Lagos, Nigeria, March 8, 2017.
Nigerian filmmaker and actress Stephanie Okereke Linus poses for a photograph during a ceremony to unveil her as the UNFPA Regional Ambassador for Maternal Health in West and Central Africa in Lagos, Nigeria, March 8, 2017. VOA

Film festival

Filmmakers from around the world, such as Nigerian director and actress Stephanie Linus, also attended the festival.

“Connecting all of us to film that is especially about us and we can see a reflection of ourselves and tell our stories and get a better understanding about where I’m coming from,” said Linus, who presented her movie, Dry, at the festival.

The film is about child marriage and the devastating effects of the practice. It is a social issue in Nigeria that surprised Linus when she first learned about it while attending college.

“I’m like, ‘Oh my God, can you believe that we’re living in the same country? We’re having two totally different experiences.’ We in the south (of Nigeria) are able to go to school, have an education, decide what happens to our bodies, and there’s some people up in the north where they don’t even have those choices.”

Linus has used the power of the media to bring awareness to child marriage, which affects girls around the world.

“I’m happy that people have taken proactive action because we screened the movie in Gambia and a month later, the government banned child marriage in Gambia,” Linus said.

Dialogue and education

One of the main goals of the festival is to create dialogue and education through film and the arts.

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“We know there’s profound things happening around the black world, and so this is a way to amplify that make people pay attention,” Babu said.

This year’s festival opened Feb. 7 and runs through Feb. 18. (VOA)