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Nokia Launches Nokia 106 in India

There's an LED torch, FM radio and option to store up to 500 text messages

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Nokia to cut jobs, says slow 5G progress not cause for layoffs.

Finnish company HMD Global, which sells Nokia-branded smartphones, on Thursday refreshed its feature phone segment with Nokia 106 for Rs 1,299 in India.

The device would be available in dark grey colour across mobile retailers and on Nokia.com/phones.

The Nokia 106 has a battery that comes with up to 15.7 hours talk time and up to 21 days of standby time.

“India is an important feature phone market. Consumers here seek outstanding battery life, a simple to use interface, and great durability. Nokia phones are synonymous with these and we’re delighted to introduce Nokia 106 and hope to continue to drive connectivity for millions of consumers here,” Ajey Mehta, Vice President and Country Head-India, HMD Global, said in a statement.

Nokia
Representational image. (IANS)

Consumers can also use a micro-USB charger to power up the Nokia 106, the company added.

The device comes with the classic Snake Xenzia game and can store up to 2,000 contacts.

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There’s an LED torch, FM radio and option to store up to 500 text messages.

The Nokia 106 sports a polycarbonate body with inherent colouring that means the colour runs through the material, thus, making scratches less detectable, the company said. (IANS)

Next Story

Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

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Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

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Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

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Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

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The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)