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Northeast India can be ‘central actor’ in water co-operation

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Source- Wikipedia.com

Kolkata: India’s northeast could be the “central actor” in water and energy co-operation in the sub-regional grouping of Bangladesh, Bhutan, India and Nepal (BBIN) given its rich resources and connectivity to the neighbouring countries, experts said here on Thursday.

“Northeast connects the east, rest of India to neighbouring countries and it is resource rich in every respect – borders, natural resources, plantation.

“If you are able to grow tea in the northeast like we do in the tea gardens of north West Bengal, we will be the highest producer of tea in the world,” said Mahendra P. Lama, an expert on south Asian co-operation.

“I see the Indian government giving huge emphasis on linking northeast in politics of growth and integrating and inter-linking rivers,” said Lama, chairperson of Centre for South, Central, Southeast Asian and Southwest Pacific Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University.

Echoing Lama, Madhukar Upadhyay, the former poverty-environment initiative adviser at the National Planning Commission, Nepal, said BBIN framework will help address issue of depleting water resources and trans-boundary water sharing.

“What we are seeing is more water in the monsoons and you have less water in the dry season so you don’t know what to do with the water in the wet season. The need of the BBIN initiative would be to understand the water science in mountains and in the plains.

“Bhutan and Nepal have similar problems which will affect countries like India and Bangladesh downstream,” he said at the ‘Advancing the BBIN Agenda: Exploring possibilities in Trade, Transit, Energy and Water Cooperation’ organised by the Observer Research Foundation and The Asian Foundation here.

However, Upadhyay, a climate change consultant, warned India’s ambitious river inter-linking project could be a “blunder” since it would create ‘negative floods’ instead of ‘positive floods’ that ensure nutrient flow.

Deliberating on Nepal’s contribution to BBIN in terms of water co-operation, Hari Pandit, an expert in water resource engineering, said 80 billion cubic metres of water stored in Nepal’s reservoirs during monsoons could be mobilised for the region during the water-deficient months.

(IANS)

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Only 3% Indian Digital Marketers Calculate ROI Correctly: LinkedIn

According to a report by LinkedIn only 3% Indian digital marketers measure ROI correctly

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LinkedIn report
LinkedIn report says that very few Indian Digital Marketers can calculate ROI correctly. Pixabay

When it comes to measuring return on investment (ROI), only 3 per cent of digital marketers in India are calculating ROI correctly — one of the lowest among all regions and lower than the global average of 4 per cent, a LinkedIn report said on Wednesday.

While 78 per cent digital marketers in India claim to be measuring digital ROI long before a sales cycle has concluded, only 3 per cent of digital marketers are measuring ROI over a six-month period or longer.

This means that many marketers are likely not measuring ROI at all, said the ‘The Long and Short of ROI’ report by Microsoft-owned professional networking platform conducted among 4,000 marketing professionals across 19 countries, including India.

“The report highlights how Indian marketers are struggling to measure the true impact of performance; they are thinking short-term and are measuring KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) instead of ROI,” said says Virginia Sharma, Director, Marketing Solutions – India, LinkedIn.

“Measuring too quickly can have a poor impact on campaigns, specifically in industries such as higher education and real estate where it can take months of consideration before sale,” Sharma added.

Most Indian marketers measure ROI within the first 30 days of the campaign, which results in an inaccurate reflection of the actual return, considering that sales cycles are 60-90 days or longer.

Measuring ROI- LinkedIn
The LinkedIn report found that Indian marketers are struggling to measure the true impact of performance. Pixabay

Fifty per cent digital marketers rely on inaccurate metrics and use cost-per-click as their ROI metric, which does not show impact-per-advertising dollar spent.

As opposed to 58 per cent globally, 64 per cent Indian marketers acknowledged that they needed to show ROI numbers to justify spend and get approval for future budget asks.

This clearly shows how pressured Indian digital marketers are internally, hence rushing to measure and prove ROI, the report noted.

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While 60 per cent of Indian marketers who measure ROI in the short term end up having budget reallocation discussions within a month, 47 per cent of Indian digital marketers don’t feel confident about their ROI measurements today, the report added.

With over 60 million users, India is LinkedIn’s fastest-growing and largest market outside the US. (IANS)