Monday February 18, 2019

Obesity affects males more than females: Study

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fat man holding a measurement tape

By NewsGram Staff Writer

Obesity may be tougher on male immune systems than females, suggests a study led by an Indian-American researcher.

Kanakadurga Singer, assistant professor in pediatrics at the University of Michigan, found that high-fat diets reprogram blood stem cells in male mice, promoting metabolic disease.

“Men and women have very different cardiovascular and diabetes risk. Male mice are often studied because their risk for developing these diseases is higher,” Singer explained.

For this, researchers compared how mice from each sex reacted to high-fat diets.

They found that in young reproductive-age female mice who were fed a high-fat diet which made them obese, the body produced only a mild inflammatory white blood cell response.

In male mice, however, diet-induced obesity made more active inflammatory white blood cells and enhanced their progenitors.

This, in turn, made the male mice more prone to higher blood glucose and insulin levels.

“We found that obesity did not trigger inflammation in female mice the way it did in males,” Singer added.

The research helps in providing the foundation for future clinical studies exploring how these differences impact diseases such as diabetes.

“Our research highlights the need to broaden clinical investigations and animal studies to include both males and females to better guide new interventions,” Singer said.

The study was published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

(With inputs from IANS)

Next Story

As Per Study, High-Risk HPV Lead to Increased CVD

For the study, researchers included 63,411 women aged 30 or older without CVD.

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Obesity leads to high CVB in women.
women with obesity were nearly two-thirds more likely to develop CVD. Pixabay

While human papillomavirus (HPV) have been linked to cancer, infection with high-risk strains of the virus might also increase the fear of cardiovascular disease (CVD), especially among women with obesity or other cardiovascular problems, according to a new research.

Certain strains of HPV are considered high risk because they can increase the probability of vaginal, vulvar, penile, mouth, throat and cervical cancers.

The study showed that women with high-risk HPV were 22 per cent more likely than uninfected women to develop cardiovascular disease.

High risk HPV contributes to CVD problems.
HPV are considered high risk as they develop CVD disease. Pixabay

In addition, women with obesity were nearly two-thirds more likely to develop CVD and those with metabolic syndrome and high-risk HPV were nearly twice as likely to develop the disorder, showed results published in Circulation Research: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Conversely, slightly more than 7 per cent of the women without CVD developed high-risk HPV infections.

Interestingly, women who smoked, consumed alcohol and reported being physically active were also more likely to have high-risk HPV. In contrast, higher education – college degree or more – was associated with a decreased likelihood of having high-risk HPV.

 

Fear of increased CVD disease is higher in obese women.
Women with obesity faces higher chances of CVD disease. Pixabay

“A better understanding of high-risk HPV as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and possible combined effects of high-risk HPV, obesity and metabolic syndrome in increasing cardiovascular disease risk may help improve preventive strategies and patient outcomes,” said Seungho Ryu, Professor at Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea.

Further studies are required to identify specific high-risk HPV genotypes that may contribute to cardiovascular disease and to examine whether vaccine strategies to reduce high-risk HPV infection for cancer prevention may also help reduce CVD, suggested the study.

ALSO READ: Keep Obesity At Bay With Flaxseeds

For the study, researchers included 63,411 women aged 30 or older without CVD. (IANS)