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Ongoing Art Exhibition in New Delhi focusses on Tantric art to entice people with its mystery

An ongoing art exhibition in New Delhi aims at proving to people that the idea of 'Tantra' is much more than eerie and pointless mumbo jumbo

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Rituals performed by a priest in a temple (representational image), Wikimedia
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New Delhi, Feb 16, 2017: The idea of Tantra has been shrouded in mystery, esoteric ‘mumbo jumbo’, wild speculation, gross misunderstandings and sheer fantasy. The explicit imagery, lavishly coloured multi-appendaged deities in union with consorts are on on display at an ongoing art exhibition.

In the mid-20th century as modern art came under the influence of abstract ideals, with the rise of “Abstract Expressionism” and “Post Painterly Abstraction”, painting fore-fronted western modern art movements where basic symbolic forms became the norm in western modern art.

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As Indian modern artists came increasingly in contact with Western modernist movements, they recognised increasing similarity with these International modern art forms and their own indigenous tantric motifs that they began incorporating into their art works.

For the most part, the Indian contemporary modern artists were not specifically practicing tantra but they in various creative ways incorporated this familiar imagery into their works of art.

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The works of Raza, Sohan Qadri and even M.F. Husain are good examples of this. However, skilfully these works used the tantric iconography they did not necessarily portray a direct tantric experience of the maker.

“Tantra” curated By Bryan Mulvihill, is on at Art Konsult in Hauz Khas Village till February 18.

The show includes a range of vivid and rich coloured canvases, created by numerous masters and contemporaries. It depicts the ancient culture and method of tantra that was a highly believed and used technique in the past.

The exhibit brings tales from the yesteryears in colourful forms and gives a glimpse of the spiritual side of ancient India. Through mediums like acrylic, watercolours and mix media the essence of tantra was portrayed to the audience.

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“Tantra has always been a subject of anonymity for everyone, but this exhibition will provide people a sneak peek into the world of tantra through the means of extraordinary art works created by masters and contemporaries,” said Siddhartha Tagore, owner of Art Konsult.

“These colorful and bold works will surely attract art lovers of the capital,” he added.

The paintings on display burst out loud with bright colours and eye striking colour combinations. Each artwork depicts the spiritual method in every explicit manner and let spectators to go in flow with the visual treat displayed at the exhibition. (IANS)

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Facts about Indian Railways you can’t miss

India proudly boasts of world's largest railway network. Not only that, but the India railways itself can boast as the biggest employer in the India. 

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Facts about Indian Railways you shouldn't miss. Wikimedia Common
Facts about Indian Railways you shouldn't miss. Wikimedia Common

India proudly boasts of world’s largest railway network. Not only that, but the India railways itself can boast as the biggest employer in India.

Railways is a major part of India, not only because of its importance as a means of transportation but also because of its political and economic significance.

Here are some interesting facts about Indian Railways which might surprise you :

  • The New Delhi-Bhopal Shatabdi Express is the fastest train in India. The train runs at an average speed of 91 kmph and touches a top speed of 150 kmph on the 195 km Delhi-Agra stretch. The Nilgiri Express with an average speed of 10 kmph is said to be India’s slowest train.
Indian Railways is one of the most important and controversial transport in India. Wikimedia Commons
Indian Railways is one of the most important and controversial transports in India. Wikimedia Commons
  •  Indian Railways-owned the longest railway platform in the world at Kharagpur with a length of 2,733 feet. Now, breaking the record, Gorakhpur station has recently taken its place with a length of 4,430 feet.
  • Two historical railway elements are included in the UNESCO’ World Heritage site list – the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus, and the Indian Mountain Railways.The Indian Mountain Railways includes three railways – the Darjeeling Himalayan Railways, Nilgiri Mountain Railways and Kalka Shimla Railway. All three trains have been functional for some 100 years. The Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus is famous for its classic fusion of Gothic art with Indian architecture.
Indian Railways is on UNESCO list too. Wikimedia Commons.
Indian Railways is on UNESCO list too. Wikimedia Commons.
  • The Vivek Express (Dibrugarh to Kanyakumari) travels the longest distance of 4273 km. The shortest run is taken by a few scheduled services between Nagpur and Ajni – a total of 3 kms.
  • Mathura junction has the maximum number of routes emerging from it. The 7 of them include – Broad Gauge (BG) line to Agra Cantt, BG line to Bharatpur, BG line to Alwar, BG line to Delhi, Metre Gauge (MG) line to Achnera, MG line to Vrindavan and MG line to Hathras.
  • The railways function on a high operating ratio of 94%, that is, it spends 94 paise on every rupee that it earns.
  • The mascot for Indian Railways is Bholuor Bholu the guard elephant, which was designed by National Institute of Design. It was introduced on 16th April 2002.

    Bholu - the elephant guard was revealed in 2002. Wikimedia Commons
    Bholu – the elephant guard was revealed in 2002. Wikimedia Commons
  • The oldest working Indian locomotive still in use is the Fairy Queen, which worked with a steam engine.
  • India has eight Railway Museums – in Delhi, Pune, Kanpur, Mysore, Kolkata, Chennai, Ghum, and Tiruchirappalli. The National Railway Museum in Delhi is the largest rail museum in Asia.
  • Toilets were introduced in 1909 in the lower classes of trains, after a letter by certain Okhil Babu that described the ordeal he faced due to the absence of lavatories.