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Online Petition launched to Ban Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) by a group of Women belonging to Dawoodi Bohra Community

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Ban Female Genital Mutilation, Wikimedia

Delhi, Dec 10, 2016 : Recently, a petition has been doing the rounds on Internet. The online petition is launched by a group of women belonging to the Dawoodi Bohra community who underwent Female Genital Mutilation.

This petition aims at rooting out this ancient practice and was initiated by an advocacy group known as ‘Speak Out on FGM’ on Change.org on Thursday ahead of the International Human Rights Day.

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According to the PTI, the petition’s report will be submitted to the welfare of women and child wing of United Nations. A similar petition was also launched last year as well, in the month of December which had received an overwhelming response and was submitted to Union Women and Child Development minister, Maneka Gandhi.

In December 2012, the UN General Assembly had adopted a unanimous resolution on banning FGM. The World Health Organisation (WHO) classifies FGM as a violation of the human rights of girls and women.

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Many women involved in the petition voiced their opinions. Ranalvi said, “I have no hesitation in admitting that I was subjected to FGM at a very young age, but I have ensured that my daughter, who is now 22, does not undergo this brutality.” Another 50-year-old working woman, Maasooma Ranalvi from Delhi said, “Our main objective to make at least everyone aware about this age-old practice being observed in our country since last 1400 years which in not only shameful but is unconstitutional and utterly violates human rights.”

Poonawala, the president of the University Women’s Association, a non-profit organisation working towards empowering women quoted,”We want the government to acknowledge it and stand behind us. Promulgate a law to flush out this regressive ritual from the society.”

prepared by Shambhavi Sinha of NewsGram. Twitter:  @shambhavispeaks

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Women Live on Average 4.4 Years Longer than Men. Why?

Samira Asma is WHO assistant director general for data, analytics and delivery. She says men die earlier than women because they do not take as good care of their health as women

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Women participate in a fitness class lead by Kira Stokes, right, at NYSC Lab in New York, May 11, 2017. VOA

New data finds women everywhere live on average 4.4 years longer than men because they see the doctor more frequently and generally take better care of their health.

While women outlive men around the world, the World Health Organization’s Statistics Overview 2019 says their life expectancy is sharply reduced because of maternal deaths. It says this highlights the big health gap that still exists between rich and poor countries.

The World Health Organization reports one in 41 women die from maternal causes in poor countries where access to health services are scarce. This compared with one in 3,300 maternal deaths in rich countries.

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Men are more likely to die from preventable and treatable noncommunicable diseases and road traffic accidents. VOA

Samira Asma is WHO assistant director general for data, analytics and delivery. She says men die earlier than women because they do not take as good care of their health as women. Also, they tend to be exposed to greater risks.

“In many circumstances, men use health care less than women. They are less likely to seek care and to continue care once diagnosed of a certain condition. And also, men are more likely to die from preventable and treatable noncommunicable diseases and road traffic accidents,” says Asma.

Leading causes of death 

Of the 40 leading causes of death, the report says men have higher death rates than women from 33 of the risk factors. For example, the report says men smoke and drink alcohol much more than women. It finds global suicide mortality rates are 75 percent higher in men than in women.

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Jameson Florence, left, and Mark Jablonski as they smoke La Traviata cigars outside the Rain City Cigar shop in Seattle. VOA

Asma says noncommunicable diseases are on the rise in most of the low- and middle-income countries, especially in Africa. She tells VOA this is due to the emergence of risk factors such as tobacco use, increase in alcohol consumption and unhealthy diets.

ALSO READ: Rising Awareness Among Indians Towards Mental Health

“In terms of leading causes of noncommunicable disease-related deaths, are cardiovascular and ischemic heart disease. And hypertension. Though it is preventable and treatable, a risk factor is not being addressed,” she said.

Asma says statistics on NCD-related deaths underscore the need to prioritize primary health care. She says people in these facilities can receive the medicine and treatment they need for their ailments. She notes that people who seek primary health care are made aware of the risk factors that can cause premature deaths. (VOA)