Friday October 19, 2018
Home India Open or close...

Open or closed diplomacy: Does it matter if Indo-Pak relations improve

0
//
123
Republish
Reprint

The National Security Advisers (NSAs) of India and Pakistan held an undisclosed meeting in Bangkok on Sunday. A range of discussions took place according to several news reports including peace and security, terrorism and Jammu & Kashmir between the two nations.

Apparently, only the Prime Minister’s Office was aware of the conduct of the meeting. Both the countries had decided on the location by mutual consensus. This development of relations can create varied subtexts in the bordering nations, which can be generic or specific in nature.

For the cynic who like to question or know all details of strategic ties under the gambit of public awareness can, and are, questioning the intentions of the undisclosed meet between the countries. For those the prime explanation is that it is not the end of open diplomacy and yes, some information are not meant to be disclosed in the public view.

The RTI Act 2005 itself is self-restrictive in nature. The Act does not make the Right to Information an absolute right but imposes a restriction on this privilege. Section 8(1) of the Act deals with exemption from disclosure of information for some areas of governance. The section says that “Notwithstanding anything contained in this Act, there shall be no obligation to give any citizen.”

The usual exemption permitting Government to withhold access to information is generally in respect of these matters: (1) International relations and national security; (2) Law enforcement and prevention of crime; (3) Internal deliberations of the government; (4) Information obtained in confidence from some source outside the Government; (5) Information which, if disclosed, would violate the privacy of an individual; (6) Information, particularly of an economic nature, when disclosed, would confer an unfair advantage on some person or subject or government; (7) Information which is covered by legal/professional privilege, like communication between a legal advisor and his client and (8) Information about scientific discoveries and inventions and improvements, essentially in the field of weapons.

One must realise, in an age where media yells and demands answers in the name of democracy, some information aren’t meant for the public. In such situation, governments are put under scanner and their intentions are doubted on the ground of having some implicit agenda in mind. It must also be noted that this ‘secret’ meeting must have been decided after much deliberation and detailing to better the Indo-Pak relations.

Questions of undermining nature, such as these, can jeopardise the hope of betterment in relations between two nations at conflict with each other. It can complicate the strategies and create axiomatic apprehension within the countrymen.

Also, the media are to pay special attention to mending itself from becoming exigent in nature or rather need to not represent it under a negative gambit of secret diplomacy.

India and Pakistan sought to have NSA-level talks on several occasions in the past, though they failed due to internal or external reasons. The Indian media have, in past, over emphasised on the expectations from the meet that the attempts tend to fall in the vast valleys of expectations.

What we fail to recognise is that at times certain issues are so delicate that they need to be treated with patience, sensibility and, more so, should be under a restricted debate for achieving productive results. These ambiguities at times are more certain than the stated facts.

If these undisclosed meetings between the NSAs can bring a paradigm shift in the Indo-Pak relations then why not?

It can be assumed that the NSA-level talks in Bangkok might contribute to developing a series of bilateral conversations. It may even be fateful or prudent or necessary but these talks can be the most substantive and meaningful dialogues between the two countries.

If the idea of better Indo-Pak relations is not more important than the apparent public awareness of international relation, then yes we should fight and demand only ‘open diplomacy’.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

India and Pakistan have to become Peaceful Neighbours, says Jammu and Kashmir CM Mehbooba Mufti

“Jaise ki Vajpayee ji ke time par tha, Jaise ek dusre ke hamsaye hai, hume miljul ke rehne ki aadat dalni padegi aur aman se rehni ki aadat dalni padegi (Like it was during (Atal Bihari) Vajpayee’s time, we should learn to live peacefully as neighbours,”

0
Jammu and Kashmir Chief Minister Mehbooba Mufti. Facebook

Jammu and Kashmir, May 15, 2017: J&K Chief Minister Mehbooba Mufti spoke to media on Saturday after the meeting of youth delegations at her hometown Srinagar.
CM said that India and Pakistan have to learn how to be good and peaceful neighbors.

Mehbooba further expressed her grief over the killings on the border after two civilians lost their lives on Saturday during a shootout between Indian and Pakistani troops on LoC in Nowshera sector of Rajouri district, mentioned HT report.

The CM said “It is very unfortunate that the firing which is going on for past few days has led to deaths. First a lady died. Today there have been more deaths. Our stand has always remained that war and confrontation (between the two countries) has always affected (Kashmir) Valley and our people.”

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

She added, “That is why I will ask both nations; Pakistan should think that this type of shelling leads to killings of people in Jammu and Kashmir. I believe there will be deaths on the other side as well because in retaliatory fire people were killed there also and here also they are killed.”

Mufti said that no one will benefit from these exchanges of fire. Only the innocent people will lose their lives and that is the last thing any nation wants.

Remembering the time of BJP government under former PM Sh. Atal Bihari Vajpayee, she said “Jaise ki Vajpayee ji ke time par tha, Jaise ek dusre ke hamsaye hai, hume miljul ke rehne ki aadat dalni padegi aur aman se rehni ki aadat dalni padegi (Like it was during (Atal Bihari) Vajpayee’s time, we should learn to live peacefully as neighbours.”

The CM ensured the state of security and said that the state government will consider any request for security from separatist leaders following a threat by Hizbul Mujahideen commander Zakir Rashid Bhat.

“When somebody will seek security from us, we will think over it,” Mufti told reporters.
It is to be noted here that Zakir had earlier threatened Hurriyat leaders if they “create hurdles in the path of making Kashmir an Islamic State,” she further added.

– prepared by Nikita Tayal of NewsGram, Twitter: @NikitaTayal6