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Outswinger: Dhaka Roads turn Bloody: Thanks to Goat Killing (sacrifices) and Rain

On the day of Eid, animal killing shows its ugly face in the name of religion

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A bit of rain and Eid and the roads run red with blood. #Dhaka #Bangladesh, says Edward Reed @ReesEdward

Dhaka, Bangladesh: This is unprecedented. The animal cruelty and killing in the name of religious sacrifices presented a savage scene for the humanity:

These pictures were posted on September 13 at Twitter by @EdwardRees who as per the Twitter account lives in Dhaka and is associated with the United Nations.

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A bit of rain and Eid and the roads run red with blood. #Dhaka #Bangladesh, says Edward Reed @ReesEdward

September 12-15 is being observed as Eid-al-Adha (also known as Bakrid)- a prominent religious festival in Islam. This day is a “Feast of Sacrifice”,i.e., Muslims kill (sacrifice) goats to Allah and then distribute this sacrifice as feast among themselves.

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A bit of rain and Eid and the roads run red with blood. #Dhaka #Bangladesh, says Edward Reed @ReesEdward

Millions of goats are slaughtered on this day to quench the bloody thirst of humanity. The roads of Dhaka presented gory details of the pious day: Blood spreading into streets compounded by lashes of rains! Result: “Rivers of Blood in Dhaka” as Dhaka Tribune depicted the scenario with this headline.

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A bit of rain and Eid and the roads run red with blood. #Dhaka #Bangladesh, says Edward Reed @ReesEdward

India Today appropriately termed the scene as “Dhaka streets transforming into Blood Streams after Eid sacrifices and Rain.”

In a true sense of ‘Religion is opium’, a developing country with poor infra structure and inability to effectively cope with natural excesses (if not calamity) admixed with over zeal for religion played out a perfectly sorrowful scenario in form of sanguinous streets.

Animal killing at a mass level as a religious celebration sounds horrific and grotesque. However, this time I found a different chatter also. May be due to convergence brought about by social media, this sentiment got louder also: People are questioning why animal killing! Social media was abuzz with these hashtags: #EcofriendlyEid and #BloodlessEid

At least, a debate is happening!

Rakesh Chauhan from Narnaul, India gave a cogent argument:

नर मुंड का स्थान नारियल ले सकता है तो बकरे का स्थान लौकी या पपीता क्यों नहीं? सनातन धर्म तुम महान हो! #EcoFriendlyEid

Anna Solaiman wrote a blog on The Huffington Post and stated: “I am celebrating all life with a Vegan Eid.” She adds: “The faithful can choose to reject animal sacrifices and instead show mercy and compassion during Eid simply by eating vegan..”

Hi five to Anna!

Religion and compassion go hand in hand. Let this moral equation not be disturbed!

(Outswinger: Through my Outswingers, I speak on a host of issues- local to global!)

  • Enakshi

    Such customs :/

  • Krishna Rao

    This is disgusting. Savages.

  • Manthra koliyer

    Such customs should not be practiced.

Next Story

Bangladesh’s Second Nuclear Plant, Chinese Companies Look Up For The Contract

“Currently, we have been working on site selection,” he said, adding that the officials of the Chinese companies formally expressed their intent through letters sent to the ministry of science and technology and the chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission.

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Construction workers use heavy equipment while building Bangladesh’s first nuclear plant in Rooppur in northwestern Pabna district, about 160 km (100 miles) from Dhaka, in this undated handout photo. VAO

Three Chinese companies have started lobbying Bangladesh for a contract to build the nation’s second nuclear power plant, officials said, as the government pushed to finish its first multibillion-dollar Russian-backed nuclear reactor within five years.

Mahbubul Hoq, chairman of Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, told BenarNews, an RFA-affiliated online news service, that officials of three Chinese companies met with him during the past few months and expressed interest in building the second nuclear plant, which is expected to cost 1.5 trillion taka (U.S. $18 billion).

“The project is at the formative stage,” Hoq said Wednesday. “We are yet to decide who would build the plant.”

“But the officials of Chinese companies came to my office and did show their interest in building the second nuclear power plant,” he said.

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“The influence of Chinese companies has been on the rise,” said Hossain Zillur Rahman, an economist and former commerce adviser. “Now they want to implement nuclear power project in Bangladesh.” Pixabay

In November 2018, Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina formally inaugurated construction of the first nuclear plant – estimated to cost more than 1 trillion taka (U.S. $13 billion) – in Rooppur in northwestern Pabna district, about 160 km (100 miles) from Dhaka.

Officials expect it to become operational by 2024, about a year from its original target date of completion. Previously, officials said the two reactors would be expected to produce a combined output of 2,400 megawatts per day.

“Hopefully, we will start producing electricity by December 2024,” Hoq said, referring to the first power plant.

He said representatives of the China National Nuclear Corp. (CNNC) handed him brochures about the state-owned company during their meeting at his office in Dhaka.

“Besides, two more representatives of the Chinese companies saw me in this regard. They assured us that they could build the nuclear plant using state-of-the-art technology,” Hoq said while declining to name the other companies.

The Chinese embassy in Dhaka did not respond to BenarNews emails seeking comments.

Hoq said Hasina, during a recent public event, pledged to build the second plant in the southern coastal districts.

“In line with her announcement, the authorities last year tasked us to find a suitable place to build the second nuclear power plant,” Hoq said.

Project director Mizanur Rahman confirmed to BenarNews that the government had approved plans to build the second plant in one of the country’s southern coastal districts.

“Currently, we have been working on site selection,” he said, adding that the officials of the Chinese companies formally expressed their intent through letters sent to the ministry of science and technology and the chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission.

Bangladesh has not decided on how it would finance the construction of the second plant. Officials previously told BenarNews that Russia was providing 90 percent of the funds for the first plant through soft loans, while the Bangladeshi government would shoulder the remaining 10 percent of the construction cost.

Getting dragged in China-India regional power play

China is one of Bangladesh’s largest trading partners, with bilateral trade reaching about U.S. $18 billion, with imbalance tilted heavily in Beijing’s favor. The Bangladeshi Army has been equipped with Chinese tanks, its navy uses Chinese frigates and its air force flies Chinese fighter jets.

There are 400 Chinese companies in Bangladesh, according to Chinese envoy Zhang Zuo during a speech at a Dhaka business event last month.

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Officials expect it to become operational by 2024, about a year from its original target date of completion. Previously, officials said the two reactors would be expected to produce a combined output of 2,400 megawatts per day. Pixabay

Bangladesh officially joined China’s massive One Belt One Road (OBOR) infrastructure initiative in 2016 when it signed agreements for implementing 27 projects, including 10 infrastructure initiatives that would be financed by Beijing, according to documents from the Bangladesh finance ministry.

“Of the total 27 projects, 10 are Belt-and-Road initiative projects,” a ministry official told BenarNews on the condition of anonymity. “But we do not mention in official papers due to political sensitivity about the BRI.”

OBOR, also known in other countries as Belt-and-Road Initiative (BRI), is Beijing’s globe-spanning project with a price tag of at least U.S. $1 trillion. It stretches across 70 countries and aims to become a 21st Century Silk Road by weaving a network of railways, ports and bridges, linking China with Africa, Europe and Southeast Asia.

Also Read: Amazon Accused of Violating Kids’ Privacy with Alexa

But involving Beijing in the construction of nuclear plants in Bangladesh may drag Hasina’s government into the power tussle between Beijing and New Delhi over dominance in South Asia, an analyst told BenarNews.

“The influence of Chinese companies has been on the rise,” said Hossain Zillur Rahman, an economist and former commerce adviser. “Now they want to implement nuclear power project in Bangladesh.” (RFA)