Monday June 18, 2018

Painful Joints Impact Sex Life: Survey

Joint pain can affect many parts of the body including hands, hips, knees, fingers, back and neck

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Painful Joints Impact Sex Life: Survey
Painful Joints Impact Sex Life: Survey. Pixabay
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Painful joints have become a bigger and more real reason than the good old excuse of “having a headache” for people abstaining from physical intimacy, according to new research.

Arthritis Research Britain conducted the survey to reveal the everyday challenges couples face in their relationships, and to raise awareness of the challenges faced by people with Arthritis and joint pain to stay intimate in their relationships.

Two-thirds of the respondents between the age group of 55-69 felt that their relationship was less intimate than when they first got together and nearly a quarter of married couples say they’re unsatisfied with their current love life.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Nearly a third of the couples surveyed don’t cuddle or hold hands enough anymore, nearly half feel that they aren’t having enough sex and have sex less often than once a fortnight, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

“As we rush around leading busy lives, it’s easy for relationships to suffer. The survey shows that couples want to be more physically intimate with one another, holding hands, having a cuddle and having sex are all important to keep a healthy relationship,” said sex expert Tracey Cox.

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Joint pain can affect many parts of the body including hands, hips, knees, fingers, back and neck. This makes movements that many of us take for granted, like having sex, holding hands or cuddling incredibly painful.

Previous studies have shown that 13 percent of people with Arthritis found joint pain impacted their sex life. (Bollywood Country)

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Happy Sex Life comes with Hard Work and Effort, says Study

The findings are based on research involving approximately 1,900 participants from both heterosexual and same-sex relationships

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Toronto, November 8, 2016: The secret to a happy sex life is the belief that it takes hard work and effort, instead of expecting sexual satisfaction to simply happen, says a study.

“Your sex life is like a garden, and it needs to be watered and nurtured to maintain it, says a new study,” said researcher Jessica Maxwell from the University of Toronto.

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These “sexpectations” — the need to work on sexual growth or rely on sexual destiny — are so powerful they can either sustain otherwise healthy relationships or undermine them, she added.

“People who believe in sexual destiny are using their sex life as a barometer for how well their relationship is doing, and they believe problems in the bedroom equal problems in the relationship as a whole,” Maxwell said.

“Whereas people who believe in sexual growth not only believe they can work on their sexual problems, but they are not letting it affect their relationship satisfaction,” she pointed out.

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The findings are based on research involving approximately 1,900 participants from both heterosexual and same-sex relationships.

Maxwell said there is a honeymoon phase lasting about two to three years where sexual satisfaction is high among both sexual growth and sexual destiny believers.

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But the benefit of believing in sexual growth becomes apparent after this initial phase, as sexual desire begins to ebb and flow, she added.

The study, published online in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, showed that, while sexual-growth beliefs can buffer the impact of problems in the bedroom, they do not help as much if the problems become too substantial, Maxwell noted. (IANS)