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Pakistan- born Canadian Writer Tarek Fatah slams Maulvis, who misguide Muslims by making them believe in Life after Death in ‘Jannat’

Tarek Fatah said that Muslims should stop believing in maulvis who give them hope of a beautiful afterlife in 'Jannat'

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Tarek Fatah. Source: tarekfatah.com
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Jaipur, Nov 20, 2016: Tarek Fatah, a Pakistan- born Canadian writer urged the Islamic community to not get misguided by the maulvis who give them a hope of life after death in ‘Jannat’.

Fatah said that “Muslims should understand that it is all about the present life, the real life is what we live here”.

According to PTI, on the second day of Jaipur Dialogues he said that it is funny that even the educated Muslims believe the theory of a beautiful life after death in ‘Jannat’.

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He said that his native country, Pakistan has been performing surgical strikes against its neighbour, India since 1947 and has been circulating counterfeit Indian currency as means of vengeance for the 1971 war.

[bctt tweet=”Even the educated Muslims believe the theory of a beautiful life after death in ‘Jannat,’ says Tarek Fatah.” username=””]

Fatah also condemned the Delhi Chief Arvind Kejriwal and the Former Chief Minister of Jammu and Kashmir Omar Abdullah for their objection to the government’s decision of demonetization of the Rs 500 and Rs 1000 notes.

Strategic Affairs Analyst Sushant Sareen said that the issues in Kashmir are not just limited to the particular state but has engulfed the entire country and the Indian citizens need to be informed about the solution available for it.

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He further added, the main cause of the Kashmir issue is “intellectual failure” and that “the provisions in the Article 370 of the Constitution was not a hurdle in the solution of the Kashmir issue”.

Sareen also said that “Political establishments and experts say there should be political solution to the Kashmir issue but what specific and exact political solution should be there, has not been elaborated”.

The problem could be solved if the citizens of Kashmir start recognising themselves as Indian citizens, Sareen said.

Sareen advised that “It should be made mandatory that children of government employees, officers and elected public representatives from the level of Panchayat to Parliament will get education in government schools”.

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Lt Gen (Retd) Ata Hasnain holds the separatists responsible for the conditions in Kashmir. He said that “Those who spread hatred takes advantage of financially weak people”.

He said that both the Army and the police need to be stationed in the valley to maintain peace and the situation could be improved by refining the education, healthcare and financial conditions of the people living in the valley, mentioned PTI.

David Frawley, an American Hindu teacher said that some regional parties are opposing the actions of the Prime Minister, Narendra Modi to protect their own agenda. He frowned upon Arvind Kejriwal, the Chief Minister of Delhi for his opposition to the demonetization in India.

-prepared by Shivam Thaker of NewsGram. Twitter: @Shivam_Thaker

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Muslims in Malaysia Rally In Kuala Lumpur To Keep Status

Mahathir’s new government won a stunning victory in a May 9 general election amid anger over a massive corruption scandal.

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Malaysia, Malay
Protesters rally near a mosque to celebrate the government's decision not to ratify a U.N. anti-discrimination convention, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Dec. 8, 2018. Thousands of Malaysian Muslims are rallying against any attempt to strip ethnic Malay majority of their privileges. VOA

Tens of thousands of Malaysian Muslims rallied Saturday in Kuala Lumpur against any attempt to strip the ethnic Malay majority of its privileges, in the first massive street gathering since Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad’s alliance won a historic vote in May.

The rally, backed by the country’s two largest opposition Malay parties, was initially aimed at protesting a government plan to ratify a U.N. treaty against racial discrimination. Critics allege that ratifying the treaty would end Malay privileges under a decades-old affirmative action policy. The plan to ratify was eventually abandoned, but organizers decided to proceed with what they called a “thanksgiving” rally.

Rare racial clashes

Racial clashes have been rare in multiracial Malaysia since deadly riots in 1969. A year later, Malaysia instituted a preferential program that gives Malays privileges in jobs, education, contracts and housing to help narrow a wealth gap with the minority Chinese. Ethnic Malays account for nearly two-thirds of the country’s 32 million people, with large Chinese and Indian minorities.

Malaysia, Malay
A protester covers his face with headbands reading “No to ICERD” during a rally to celebrate the government’s decision not to ratify a U.N. anti-discrimination convention called ICERD at Independent Square in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Dec. 8, 2018. ICERD stands for International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination. VOA

Saturday’s rally came less than two weeks after more than 80 people were arrested in a riot at an Indian temple in a suburb outside Kuala Lumpur. The government was quick to stress that the violence was the result of a land dispute and was not a racial riot. Still, the government warned Saturday’s rally-goers not to make any provocative statements that could fan racial tensions.

Mahathir said the government allowed the rally as part of democracy, but warned against any chaos. The rally was held under tight police security, but ended peacefully after rain started to fall.

Former Prime Minister Najib Razak, who has been charged with multiple counts of corruption, was among opposition lawmakers at the rally.

In the streets, 55,000

Police said there were at least 55,000 people on the streets. Many wore white T-shirts and headbands with the words “Reject ICERD,” referring to the U.N. treaty, the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination.

The protesters gathered at three locations before marching to a nearby historic square, chanting “Long live the Malays” and “Crush ICERD.”

malay
Singapore’s Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, right gestures to Myanmar’s Foreign Minister Aung San Suu Kyi, to move in closer for the group hand shake as Malaysia’s Prime Minister Najib Razak, left, watches during the opening ceremony of the 28th and 29th ASEAN summits at National Convention Center in Vientiane, Laos, Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016. VOA

“Yes, we did not ratify ICERD, but we are still here to say that we are still against it,” said shopkeeper Rosli Ikhsan. “Even if the government has said they won’t endorse it, we are still protesting with all our might from all of Malaysia.”

Mahathir’s new government won a stunning victory in a May 9 general election amid anger over a massive corruption scandal involving Najib and his government, but many Malays still support Najib’s party, the United Malays National Organization, and the Malaysian Islamic Party, which controls two of the country’s 13 states.

Some analysts say Najib and his party were using the rally to shift attention away from corruption charges against Najib, his wife, his party’s president and former government officials.

Also Read: Syrian Stranded at Malaysia Airport in a Political Limbo

“For me, ICERD is bad,” university student Nurul Qamariah said at the rally. “It’s bad because it will erode the position of Malays. This is a country for Malays. We want Malays to be superiors, but why do these people want to make Malays the same level as Chinese and Indians?” (VOA)