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Pakistan- born Canadian Writer Tarek Fatah slams Maulvis, who misguide Muslims by making them believe in Life after Death in ‘Jannat’

Tarek Fatah said that Muslims should stop believing in maulvis who give them hope of a beautiful afterlife in 'Jannat'

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Tarek Fatah. Source: tarekfatah.com

Jaipur, Nov 20, 2016: Tarek Fatah, a Pakistan- born Canadian writer urged the Islamic community to not get misguided by the maulvis who give them a hope of life after death in ‘Jannat’.

Fatah said that “Muslims should understand that it is all about the present life, the real life is what we live here”.

According to PTI, on the second day of Jaipur Dialogues he said that it is funny that even the educated Muslims believe the theory of a beautiful life after death in ‘Jannat’.

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He said that his native country, Pakistan has been performing surgical strikes against its neighbour, India since 1947 and has been circulating counterfeit Indian currency as means of vengeance for the 1971 war.

[bctt tweet=”Even the educated Muslims believe the theory of a beautiful life after death in ‘Jannat,’ says Tarek Fatah.” username=””]

Fatah also condemned the Delhi Chief Arvind Kejriwal and the Former Chief Minister of Jammu and Kashmir Omar Abdullah for their objection to the government’s decision of demonetization of the Rs 500 and Rs 1000 notes.

Strategic Affairs Analyst Sushant Sareen said that the issues in Kashmir are not just limited to the particular state but has engulfed the entire country and the Indian citizens need to be informed about the solution available for it.

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He further added, the main cause of the Kashmir issue is “intellectual failure” and that “the provisions in the Article 370 of the Constitution was not a hurdle in the solution of the Kashmir issue”.

Sareen also said that “Political establishments and experts say there should be political solution to the Kashmir issue but what specific and exact political solution should be there, has not been elaborated”.

The problem could be solved if the citizens of Kashmir start recognising themselves as Indian citizens, Sareen said.

Sareen advised that “It should be made mandatory that children of government employees, officers and elected public representatives from the level of Panchayat to Parliament will get education in government schools”.

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Lt Gen (Retd) Ata Hasnain holds the separatists responsible for the conditions in Kashmir. He said that “Those who spread hatred takes advantage of financially weak people”.

He said that both the Army and the police need to be stationed in the valley to maintain peace and the situation could be improved by refining the education, healthcare and financial conditions of the people living in the valley, mentioned PTI.

David Frawley, an American Hindu teacher said that some regional parties are opposing the actions of the Prime Minister, Narendra Modi to protect their own agenda. He frowned upon Arvind Kejriwal, the Chief Minister of Delhi for his opposition to the demonetization in India.

-prepared by Shivam Thaker of NewsGram. Twitter: @Shivam_Thaker

Next Story

Story Of Pakistani Immigrant Who Came To U.S. Helps Feed The Homeless

“I have a deep interest in social justice, Catholic social teaching … and so to be part of something bigger than myself, my son and I chose to come to lunch here today to support and be a small part of a great thing."

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Sakina Halal Grill serves a hot luncheon buffet to paying as well as non-paying guests. (J.Taboh) VOA

When Pakistani immigrant Kazi Mannan came to the U.S. in 1996 as an impoverished young adult, he could only dream about success. He worked long hours in a series of tough jobs, saved money and learned everything he could about working and living in America.

His hard work paid off. After more than 20 years, he’s now a successful entrepreneur and owner of a popular Pakistani-Indian restaurant just a few blocks from the White House.

But what’s most remarkable about his story is what he’s doing in his restaurant every day.

Kazi Mannan speaks with two of his regular homeless guests at his restaurant, which welcomes paying and non-paying customers. (J. Taboh/VOA)
Kazi Mannan speaks with two of his regular homeless guests at his restaurant, which welcomes paying and non-paying customers. (J. Taboh) . VOA

Mannan offers free meals to the homeless and anyone else in need.

Paying it forward

He says it’s his way of heeding the principles of his Muslim faith.

“I know God is happy with me, what I do, because I do it with my pure heart, with my pure intention, to uplift others without seeking any reward, any recognition,” he says. “I don’t need any awards, I don’t need any money. I just want to please Him.”

Mannan helps the needy he says, because growing up poor in Pakistan, he knows what it’s like to be hungry.

“I have nine siblings and [we didn’t have] much to eat … when you are poor and you [don’t] have things that other people have, when you get it, you want to appreciate, you want to share with others,” he said.

His desire to share deepened as he worked as a limousine driver in the nation’s capital. He saw homeless people on the street, day and night, in all kinds of weather — looking for food in trash cans.

The experience had an impact.

“I don’t want to see another human being going through the poverty that I went through. I don’t want to see another human being going through the hunger that I went through. I want them to have that feeling that they were being accepted, so they can come and sit here and eat with respect,” he says.

Just like family

His message is simple. Come to Sakina Halal Grill, which is named after his late mother, ask for food, use the restroom, and sit for as long as you want.

“We will love you and respect you the same way we respect a paying guest. We will treat you like family,” he said.

Members of the homeless community are welcome at Sakina Halal Grill restaurant anytime for a free meal. (J. Taboh/VOA)
Members of the homeless community are welcome at Sakina Halal Grill restaurant anytime for a free meal. (J. Taboh). VOA

Marchellor Lesueur, who is homeless, has been coming to the restaurant every day for the past eight months.

“I think that he’s a saint. He’s a beautiful man,” he says about Mannan. “My stomach was growling, I was looking for a blessing, then he popped up, gave me a card and invited me to a restaurant for lunch. And I was so overwhelmed and happy I couldn’t wait to get here, and ever since then I’ve been coming.”

Hegehiah Griakley is also a regular. He was finishing up a generous portion of rice and chicken, which he described as two meals in one.

“This is more than lunch,” he said. “They give you enough to feed you for the rest of the day I think. The food is great, the people are nice. I wouldn’t mind working here!”

Griakley says he once asked Mannan what he could give him in return for the free food. “Because most people expect you to give back.”

“But he said ‘no, no, no, no, no!’ He just wanted me to have a good meal,” he recalls. “I couldn’t believe that. It was so nice. I loved it.”

Compassionate immigrant

Mannan estimates that he’s provided more than 80,000 free meals since the restaurant opened in 2013.

And when he’s not feeding the needy in his restaurant, Mannan delivers meals to local shelters and churches, and organizes food and clothing drives at nearby parks.

Kazi Mannan distributes food to the needy at a local food and coat drive -- one of many he organizes every year. (K.Mannan)
Kazi Mannan distributes food to the needy at a local food and coat drive — one of many he organizes every year. (K.Mannan). VOA

“Some people tell me ‘homeless people are using drugs and you’re feeding them; that’s bad.’” To which he responds, “For you, it’s bad, for me, it’s joy. … I see a person who’s fallen to the ground. Whatever problem they went through to become homeless, it’s not my job to judge — my job is to give them respect and love.”

His paying customers are still his main business. Many of them contribute towards the free meals… and support his cause.

First time customer Geralyn Nathe-Evans was visiting from Minnesota when she read about Mannan’s mission in an article.

“I have a deep interest in social justice, Catholic social teaching … and so to be part of something bigger than myself, my son and I chose to come to lunch here today to support and be a small part of a great thing,” she said.

Mannan uses food as a way to help his fellow man, in practice of his faith. He urges others to do the same with their talents.

“If you’re a medical doctor, can you love him through your practice? If you are a lawyer, can you love him through your practice? Be kind and be compassionate to your client?” he asks.

In doing so, he believes “we will all prosper and flourish” as a society.

Also Read: Apple Watch Can Detect And Notify Users Irregular Heart Rhythms

Meantime, he says he will continue to nourish both body and soul of all who walk through the door of his restaurant.

“Just uplifting others is a joy for me. It doesn’t matter [what] color, religion you belong to. We are all human. I am focusing on humanity. I’m bringing humanity together and this is my mission.” (VOA)