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Pakistan- born Canadian Writer Tarek Fatah slams Maulvis, who misguide Muslims by making them believe in Life after Death in ‘Jannat’

Tarek Fatah said that Muslims should stop believing in maulvis who give them hope of a beautiful afterlife in 'Jannat'

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Tarek Fatah. Source: tarekfatah.com
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Jaipur, Nov 20, 2016: Tarek Fatah, a Pakistan- born Canadian writer urged the Islamic community to not get misguided by the maulvis who give them a hope of life after death in ‘Jannat’.

Fatah said that “Muslims should understand that it is all about the present life, the real life is what we live here”.

According to PTI, on the second day of Jaipur Dialogues he said that it is funny that even the educated Muslims believe the theory of a beautiful life after death in ‘Jannat’.

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He said that his native country, Pakistan has been performing surgical strikes against its neighbour, India since 1947 and has been circulating counterfeit Indian currency as means of vengeance for the 1971 war.

[bctt tweet=”Even the educated Muslims believe the theory of a beautiful life after death in ‘Jannat,’ says Tarek Fatah.” username=””]

Fatah also condemned the Delhi Chief Arvind Kejriwal and the Former Chief Minister of Jammu and Kashmir Omar Abdullah for their objection to the government’s decision of demonetization of the Rs 500 and Rs 1000 notes.

Strategic Affairs Analyst Sushant Sareen said that the issues in Kashmir are not just limited to the particular state but has engulfed the entire country and the Indian citizens need to be informed about the solution available for it.

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He further added, the main cause of the Kashmir issue is “intellectual failure” and that “the provisions in the Article 370 of the Constitution was not a hurdle in the solution of the Kashmir issue”.

Sareen also said that “Political establishments and experts say there should be political solution to the Kashmir issue but what specific and exact political solution should be there, has not been elaborated”.

The problem could be solved if the citizens of Kashmir start recognising themselves as Indian citizens, Sareen said.

Sareen advised that “It should be made mandatory that children of government employees, officers and elected public representatives from the level of Panchayat to Parliament will get education in government schools”.

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Lt Gen (Retd) Ata Hasnain holds the separatists responsible for the conditions in Kashmir. He said that “Those who spread hatred takes advantage of financially weak people”.

He said that both the Army and the police need to be stationed in the valley to maintain peace and the situation could be improved by refining the education, healthcare and financial conditions of the people living in the valley, mentioned PTI.

David Frawley, an American Hindu teacher said that some regional parties are opposing the actions of the Prime Minister, Narendra Modi to protect their own agenda. He frowned upon Arvind Kejriwal, the Chief Minister of Delhi for his opposition to the demonetization in India.

-prepared by Shivam Thaker of NewsGram. Twitter: @Shivam_Thaker

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The Answer to The Impending Questions On Demonetization Are Here

While it did broaden the country’s tax base, it was a nightmare for the immense, cash-dependent informal economy.

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Indian Currency. Pixabay

Nearly all of the currency removed from circulation in a surprise 2016 attempt to root out illegal hoards of cash came back into the financial system, Resever Bank of India  has announced, indicating the move did little to slow the underground economy.

Prime Minister of India, Narendra Modi’s currency decree, which was designed to destroy the value of billions of dollars in untaxed cash stockpiles, caused an economic slowdown and months of financial chaos for tens of millions of people or demonetization.

Modi announced in a November 2016 TV address that all 500-rupee and 1,000-rupee notes, then worth about $7.50 and $15, would be withdrawn immediately from circulation. The banned notes could be deposited into bank accounts but the government also said it would investigate deposits over 250,000 rupees, or about $3,700. The government eventually released new currency notes worth 500 and 2,000 rupees.

 

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An activist of Congress party hold the banned 500 and 1000 rupee notes.

 

In theory, the decree meant corrupt politicians and businesspeople would suddenly find themselves sitting on billions of dollars in worthless currency, known here as “black money.”

“A few people are spreading corruption for their own benefit,” Modi said in the surprise nighttime speech announcement of the order. “There is a time when you realize that you have to bring some change in society, and this is our time.”

But even as the decree caused turmoil for those in India who have always depended on cash — the poor and middle class, and millions of small traders — the rich found ways around the currency switch. In the months after the decree, businesspeople said that even large amounts of banned currency notes could be traded on the black market, though middlemen charged heavy fees.

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Prime Minister Narendra Modi along with mayor, flickr

The reserve bank of India report said in its Wednesday report that 99.3 percent of the $217 billion in notes withdrawn from circulation had come back into the economy. Some officials had originally predicted that number could be as low as 60 percent.

Also Read: Diverse Gathering To Be Addressed This World BioFuel Day: PM Narendra Modi

“Frankly, I think demonetization was a mistake,” said Gurcharan Das, a writer and the former head of Proctor & Gamble in India. He said that while it did broaden the country’s tax base, it was a nightmare for the immense, cash-dependent informal economy.

“You can’t overnight change that in a country which is poor and illiterate. Therefore, for me it’s not only an economic failure but a moral failure as well,” Das said. (VOA)