Wednesday January 16, 2019
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Pakistan farmer drags government in court for climate change

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climate change

By- Tarun Pratap

New Delhi: A 25-year-old law student in Lahore, Asghar Lehagiri has dragged the Pakistan government into the court for its inability to work against damage in climate change and subsequently harming local farmers.

A resident of district Rahim Yar Khan in southern Punjab, Asghar Lehagiri has seen the fight of his family and all the low scale farmers around him against the unpredictable weather of Pakistan.

He filed a petition in Lahore High Court demanding action from the Government to counter the climate change. He filed that the government of Pakistan was violating his fundamental rights by neglecting the impact of climate change.

His initiative seems to have worked as Justice Syed Mansoor Ali Shah has ordered the formation of a climate change commission to push the policies that the government promised.

Sajjad Ahmed, the joint secretary of climate change ministry said that the government has made policies, but they might not have been implemented yet.

An issue that is important to a common farmer and to the whole humanity someday might not seem to be not so important for the government.

Climate change has impacted the whole life cycle of people who are dependent on nature. The developing part of the world is facing more problems than the developed.

Countries like the US want developing countries specially China and India to cut their greenhouse gas emission, but these countries are demanding that they should be given the same chance for their development as the developed nations had.

Climate change has created huge problems, the monsoon cycle is disturbed and the direct effect of it is on the farmer. The agriculture depends on the nature and any change in nature impacts it badly.

Most of the developing countries are agricultural dependent countries. The Indian subcontinent has the seasonal agricultural cycle, Rabi and Kharif, climate changes the courses of these seasonal cycles and impacts farmers and economy.

Vidarbha area of India has witnessed many suicides of farmers. A country like India where 70 per cent of the population lives off agriculture faces the worst of any impact on nature.

Asghar Lehagiri, a young law student who belongs to farmer family has had enough. But will his effort make any difference?

People in power need to make policies and push these policies which can counter the climate change.

(With inputs from agencies)

 

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China Exchanged Data With NASA On Its Recent Mission To Moon

The country has also said that it will welcome scientists and astronauts from around the world to make use of its space station, which is slated for completion by 2022.

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China
Wu Yanhua, deputy director of the national space agency, speaks during a press conference held in Beijing, China, Jan. 14, 2019. VOA

China exchanged data with NASA on its recent mission to land a Chinese spacecraft on the far side of the moon, the Chinese space agency said Monday, in what was reportedly the first such collaboration since an American law banned joint space projects with China that do not have prior congressional approval.

The space agency’s deputy director, Wu Yanhua, said NASA shared information about its lunar orbiter satellite in hopes of monitoring the landing of the Chang’e 4 spacecraft, which made China the first country to land on the far side of the moon earlier this month.

China in turn shared the time and coordinates of Chang’e 4’s scheduled landing, Wu told reporters during a briefing on the lunar mission. He added that while NASA’s satellite did not catch the precise moment of landing, it took photographs of the area afterward.

The state-run China Daily said that was the first such form of cooperation since the 2011 U.S. law was enacted.

Moon, China
The far side of the moon, photographed by the Chang’e-4 lunar probe, is seen in this image provided by China National Space Administration, Jan. 3, 2019. VOA

NASA has not published any statements on the collaboration and could not immediately be reached for comment.

The lunar mission by Chang’e 4 and its rover, Jade Rabbit 2, was a triumph for China’s growing space program, which has been rapidly catching up with those of Russia and the U.S. President Xi Jinping has placed space exploration among the country’s national development priorities and the far side mission offered a chance for China to do something not done before by any other country.

The far side of the moon – the side which faces away from Earth – posed a challenge for scientists because it is beyond radio signals’ reach. China set up a relay satellite in May to receive communication from Chang’e 4.

“In the past, we were always rushing to catch up to the advanced global standards” in space, said Wu Weiren, the chief designer of China’s lunar exploration project.

“There were many things to catch up on, and fewer things in which we could surpass others,” he said. “With the probe of the far side of the moon this time, Chinese people have done very well.”

China, Moon
This picture taken Jan. 3, 2019, and received, Jan. 4, from the China National Space Administration (CNSA) via CNS shows a robotic lunar rover on the far side of the moon. VOA

Officials at the briefing declined to give specific figures on the costs of the space program.

Wu Yanhua said the Chang’e 4 was originally built as a “backup product” for Chang’e 3. He said the spending needed to refit it for its new objective was akin to repairing a short section of subway line.

Also Read: NASA Telescopes Capture Birth of Black Hole or Neutron Star

Around the end of this year, China plans to launch Chang’e 5, which is to collect and bring back samples from the near side of the moon, the first time that has been done since 1976. Scientists are still researching whether to send Chinese astronauts, Wu said.

The country has also said that it will welcome scientists and astronauts from around the world to make use of its space station, which is slated for completion by 2022. (VOA)