Tuesday September 25, 2018

Pakistani author to release book over Skype

0
//
78
Republish
Reprint

Dhanachuli (Uttarakhand): Pakistani author Kanza Javed, denied a visa to take part in the Kumaon literary festival, will release her book here over a Skype session on Sunday.

The author’s debut book is Ashes, Wine and Dust. Javed was denied an Indian visa she sought to take part in the five-day festival that was inaugurated on Friday.

Talking to IANS, festival director Sumant Batra said the book will be released through Skype.

“It’s not about scoring a point. From the festival point of view, we cannot deprive an author of taking part in the book’s release,” said Batra, adding that he did his best to secure the visa for the author.

“However, it’s the discretion of the government and the Indian high commission to grant the visa,” he said.

However, the author’s father and brother were given visas.

The 24-year-old Javed’s book is already shortlisted for prestigious Tabor Jones South Asian prize.

Aanchal Malhotra of Tara, publisher of the book, said the Kumaon festival would have been the perfect platform to launch the young author’s book which questions the norms of society.

“It’s sad that she couldn’t come for the launch. The book is all about how to grow up as a young woman in Pakistan. The book is dedicated to free thinking women in Pakistan,” said Malhotra.

Meanwhile, other participants from Pakistan — journalist Asif Noorani and Ameena Zaidi, founder of Karachi and Islamabad literary festivals — got visas.

Terming visa denial to Javed unfortunate, Noorani said he had never faced any hurdles in his 24 visits to India.

“I was always welcomed with great warmth in India. It’s the fringe elements who create trouble,” he said.

Noorani said artists in Pakistan were upset over the cancellation of ghazal singer Ghulam Ali’s concerts in Mumbai and Pune and the attack on Sudheendra Kulkarni ahead of a book release function of former Pakistan foreign minister Khurshid Mahmud Kasuri.

(Preetha Nair, IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

400-year-old Ship Wreckage Filled With Indian Spices Found in Portugal

The wreck was found as part of a 10-year-old archaeological project backed by the municipal council of Cascais, the navy, the Portuguese government and Nova University of Lisbon.

0
ship
A divers takes photos of some of the items found after the discovery of a centuries-old shipwreck, in Cascais, Portugal. VOA

Archaeologists searching Portugal’s coast have found a 400-year-old shipwreck believed to have sunk near Lisbon after returning from India laden with spices, specialists said on Monday.

“From a heritage perspective, this is the discovery of the decade,” project director Jorge Freire said. “In Portugal, this is the most important find of all time.”

In and around the shipwreck, 40 feet (12 meters) below the surface, divers found spices, nine bronze cannons engraved with the Portuguese coat of arms, Chinese ceramics and cowry shells, a type of currency used to trade slaves during the colonial era.

ship
One of the nine nine bronze cannons engraved with the Portuguese coat of arms found by divers around a shipwreck near Cascais, Portugal. VOA

Found on Sept. 3 off the coast of Cascais, a resort town on the outskirts of Lisbon, the shipwreck and its objects were “very well-preserved,” said Freire.

Freire and his team believe the ship was wrecked between 1575 and 1625, when Portugal’s spice trade with India was at its peak.

In 1994, Portuguese ship Our Lady of the Martyrs was discovered near Fort of Sao Juliao da Barra, a military defense complex near Cascais.

“For a long time, specialists have considered the mouth of the Tagus river a hotspot for shipwrecks,” said Minister of Culture Luis Mendes. “This discovery came to prove it.”

Also Read: Gene Therapy Wins Big At Portugal’s Champalimaud Foundation

The wreck was found as part of a 10-year-old archaeological project backed by the municipal council of Cascais, the navy, the Portuguese government and Nova University of Lisbon. (VOA)

Next Story