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Parachute System In NASA’s Orion Gets Approved

The knowledge gained through the Orion programme has enabled NASA to mature computer modelling of how the system works in various scenarios.

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NASA to use Blockchain technology for air traffic management. Pixabay

NASA has successfully completed the final test to qualify Orion’s space capsule’s parachute system for flights with astronauts, ahead of its mission to send humans to the Moon and beyond, the US space agency said.

Engineers evaluated the performance of Orion’s parachute system during normal landing sequences as well as several failure scenarios and a variety of potential aerodynamic conditions to ensure astronauts can return safely from deep space missions, over the course of eight tests at the US Army’s Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona.

“We’re working incredibly hard not only to make sure Orion’s ready to take our astronauts farther than we’ve been before, but to make sure they come home safely,” Orion Programme Manager Mark Kirasich, said in a statement.

“The parachute system is complex, and evaluating the parachutes repeatedly through our test series gives us confidence that we’ll be ready for any kind of landing day situation.”

NASA
NASA has successfully completed the final test to qualify Orion’s space capsule’s parachute system for flights with astronauts

During the final test, which took place on September 12, a mock Orion was pulled out from the cargo bay of a C-17 aircraft flying higher than 6.5 miles.

The protective ring around the top of Orion that covers the parachute system was jettisoned and pulled away by the first set of Orion’s parachutes, then the remaining parachutes were deployed in precise sequence.

The Orion system has 11 parachutes, a series of cannon-like mortars, pyrotechnic bolt cutters, and more than 30 miles of Kevlar lines attaching the top of the spacecraft to the 36,000 square feet of parachute canopy material.

In about 10 minutes of descent through Earth’s atmosphere, everything must deploy in precise sequence to slow Orion and its crew from about 300 mph to a relatively gentle 20 mph for splashdown in the Pacific Ocean.

NASA
Engineers evaluated the performance of Orion’s parachute system during normal landing sequences as well as several failure scenarios Flickr

The parachute system is the only system that must assemble itself in mid-air and must be able to keep the crew safe in several failure scenarios, such as mortar failures that prevent a single parachute type to deploy, or conditions that cause some of the parachute textile components to fail.

Orion will first fly with astronauts aboard during Exploration Mission-2, a mission that will venture near the Moon and farther from Earth than ever before, launching atop NASA’s Space Launch System rocket — which will be the world’s most powerful rocket. The parachutes for Orion’s upcoming uncrewed flight test — Exploration Mission-1 — are already installed on the vehicle at Kennedy Space Centre in Florida.

Also Read: ISRO’s First Manned Space Mission to Cost $1.4 Billion

The knowledge gained through the Orion programme has enabled NASA to mature computer modelling of how the system works in various scenarios and help partner companies understand certain elements of parachute systems. (IANS)

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66% Indian Business Decision Makers Concerned About Cyber Threats

In line with this approach, 79 per cent of Indian business decision makers would want to adopt deeply-integrated or synchronised security solutions that could detect, investigate and respond to cyber threats

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Cyber Threats
Cyber security is a shared responsibility. While IT teams must be proactive in their response to Cyber Threats, knowledgeable employees and leadership teams pave the way for organisations to better detect, protect and respond. Pixabay

Sixty-six per cent of business decision makers in India believe lack of security expertise is a challenge for their organisations, while 63 per cent of Indian businesses are concerned about being exposed to Cyber Threats due to employee errors, according to a new report.

“As the threat landscape evolves, businesses too need to advance their defence mechanisms with synchronised security solutions that are designed to strengthen their cyber security posture,” Sunil Sharma, Managing Director, Sales, Sophos India and SAARC, said in a statement.

The success of an organisation’s cyber security investment lies not just in buying technology, but corporate culture, employee education and path-to-purchase also play critical roles, according to the Future of Cybersecurity in Asia Pacific and Japan-Culture, Efficiency, Awareness report.

“Cyber security is a shared responsibility. While IT teams must be proactive in their response to Cyber Threats, knowledgeable employees and leadership teams pave the way for organisations to better detect, protect and respond,” Sharma said.

Cyber Threats
Sixty-six per cent of business decision makers in India believe lack of security expertise is a challenge for their organisations, while 63 per cent of Indian businesses are concerned about being exposed to Cyber Threats due to employee errors. Pixabay

Only 19 per cent of Indian organisations regularly make significant changes to their cyber security approach, and 38 per cent intend to make changes to security approach in the next 6-24 months.

In line with this approach, 79 per cent of Indian business decision makers would want to adopt deeply-integrated or synchronised security solutions that could detect, investigate and respond to cyber threats, it added.

ALSO READ: Innovation and Startup Culture Thriving in Ghana

According to global cyber security major Sophos, main triggers for security updates — beyond changes to overall security posture — are technology and product developments, compliance and regulation requirements, and growing awareness of new attacks. (IANS)