Monday December 16, 2019

Patient Isolated in Swedish Hospital Amid Ebola Suspicion

A suspected case of the deadly Ebola virus has been reported by a Swedish hospital, officials said Friday, adding that the patient has been isolated.

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- The exterior of the University Hospital in Enkoping, Sweden, is seen in this Feb. 4, 2009 photo. Officials say a Swedish hospital has reported a suspected case of the deadly Ebola virus; results of the medical test are expected Jan. 4, 2019, VOA

A suspected case of the deadly Ebola virus has been reported by a Swedish hospital, officials said Friday, adding that the patient has been isolated.

Region Uppsala, which oversees several hospitals and medical clinics north of Stockholm, says a test had been carried out on the patient, who was not identified, adding a result would be available late Friday.

In its statement, Region Uppsala said it was so far “only a matter of suspicion,” adding “other diseases are quite possible.”

It did not say where the patient had traveled, but Sweden’s TT news agency said the patient had returned from a trip to Burundi three weeks ago and had not visited any region with the Ebola virus.

World Health Organization representation of Ebola virus.

The authorities said the hospital in Enkoping where the patient was first admitted had its emergency room shut down and the staff who treated the patient were “cared for.” The patient was eventually transferred to an infection clinic in Uppsala.

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“The patient came in Friday morning and reportedly was vomiting blood which may be a symptom of Ebola infection,” hospital spokesman Mikael Kohler told local newspaper Upsala Nya Tidning. He was not immediately available for further comment.

Eastern Congo currently faces an Ebola outbreak. All major outbreaks have been in Africa, though isolated cases have been reported outside the continent. The hemorrhagic fever’s virus is spread via contact with the bodily fluids of those infected. (VOA)

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Fragmentation Reason Behind Low Performance of Indian Healthcare

Fragmentation is the reason behind Indian healthcare's poor performance

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Indian healthcare
The reason behind the poor performance of the Indian healthcare is fragmentation. Pixabay

The vicious cycle of severe fragmentation is the reason for low performance of Indian healthcare, in comparison to other countries in Asia and elsewhere, a top official has said.

In his address at the inaugural function of the 24th edition of IIHMR University’s annual event ‘Pradanya’ with the theme “Future of Healthcare: Globalization, Innovations and You”, Special Secretary, NITI Aayog, Yaduvendra Mathur said: “The time has come to unify and transform the healthcare system to achieve optimum outcomes in terms of public health and Sustainable Development Goals.”

“India’s healthcare system lags much behind other nations. India figures at number 145 in global healthcare, compared to 92 for China, 71 for Sri Lanka, 138 for Indonesia and 111 for Egypt. The Out of Pocket (OOP) expenditure for India is high at 63 per cent, compared to just 36 per cent for China and 37 per cent for Indonesia.

“Such sub-par performance of Indian healthcare is due to its deeply fragmented nature. This fragmentation needs to be addressed through better risk profiling/insurance of patients, strategic purchase of medicines and medical supplies by government and care givers, better organization of healthcare delivery, and creating a digital health landscape.

Poor healthcare
India’s healthcare system lags much behind other nations. Pixabay

“Ayushman Bharat and initiatives like National Medical Commission Act and National Digital Health Blueprint have created a strong foundation for such integration,” he added.

The future health system of India needs five focus areas: Deliver on the unfinished public health agenda, shift health financing away from out-of-pocket spend to larger insurers, integrate service delivery horizontally and vertically, empower citizens to become better buyers of health, and harness the power of digital health, Mathur suggested.

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In his address, IIHMR University Chairman, Dr S.D. Gupta said: “Future healthcare is intrinsically linked with globalisation and technological innovations. We need to visualise what the scenario is going to be in India in the next 30 to 40 years.”

The three-day programme, which started Monday, saw over 35 health experts from India and abroad attending the technical sessions and panel discussions. (IANS)